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Nuclear News - 4/14/2011
PGS Nuclear News, April 14, 2011
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Iran Ready for Nuclear Talks with P5+1, Xinhua News Agency (4/13/2011)
    2. Iran to Continue Nuclear Program Under IAEA Eyes, Xinhua News Agency (4/12/2011)
    3. Iran to Join Nuclear Fuel Plate Producers, PressTV (4/12/2011)
    4. Iran Plans Several New Nuclear Reactors, PressTV (4/12/2011)
B.  DPRK
    1. North Korea Won't Give Up Nuke Capability: U.S. General, Reuters (4/13/2011)
    2. South Korea Presses North Korea for Bilateral Talks on Nukes, Yonhap News Agency (4/12/2011)
    3. China Calls for Favorable Conditions for Resuming 6-way Talks, Yonhap News Agency (4/12/2011)
C.  Japan
    1. World Right to Slam Nuke Program Mismanagement: Expert, The Japan Times (4/14/2011)
    2. Nuclear Crisis Upgraded to '7': Fukushima Accident Boosted to Top Level of Global Scale, Yomiuri Shimbun (4/13/2011)
    3. Government May Have Other Utilities Share TEPCO's Compensation Burden, Yomiuri Shimbun (4/13/2011)
    4. WHO Eyes 20 Year Nuclear Health Watch in Japan, AFP (4/13/2011)
D.  Nuclear Safety
    1. Seoul, Beijing Pledge Cooperation on Nuclear Safety, Arirang News (4/14/2011)
E.  Nuclear Energy
    1. France’s Areva to Support NPP Belene Construction, Standart News (4/14/2011)
    2. Poland Not to Give Up Nuclear Program: Senior Official, Xinhua News Agency (4/13/2011)
F.  Links of Interest
    1. Areva Sends 20 Specialists to Help Tepco With Reactor Crisis, Bloomberg (4/12/2011)
    2. A Survey of the World's Radioactive No-Go Zones, Der Spiegel (4/12/2011)



A.  Iran

1.
Iran Ready for Nuclear Talks with P5+1
Xinhua News Agency
4/13/2011
(for personal use only)


Deputy Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council Ali Baqeri said the Islamic republic was ready for the next round of talks with the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany (P5+1), the local satellite Press TV reported Wednesday.

Baqeri said Tuesday that the time and place for the talks, including the nuclear talks, between Iran and the G5+1 would be decided in the future, said the report.

Nuclear activities are a necessity for the country and nothing can hinder Tehran's nuclear program, Baqeri was quoted as saying, adding that the Islamic republic never sought nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction.

On Tuesday, Iran's permanent representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Ali-Asghar Soltanieh said "Iran has always been ready for non-conditional talks ... and Iran's inalienable (nuclear) rights should be recognized."

"There is also a principle that the space of the talks should be a space for cooperation, not confrontation," he was quoted as saying by the semi-official Fars news agency.

In January, six world powers wrapped up crucial nuclear talks with Iran in Istanbul but failed to reach any agreement on Iranian nuclear program.

The West suspects that Iran's uranium enrichment may be meant for producing nuclear weapons, which has been denied by Iranian officials.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-04/13/c_13827038.htm


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2.
Iran Plans Several New Nuclear Reactors
PressTV
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)


Iran's top nuclear official announces plans to build "four to five" nuclear research reactors, following the successful production and testing of second- and third-generation Iranian-brand centrifuges.

“Iran plans to build four to five new reactors with a capacity of 10-20 megawatts in different provinces within the next few years to produce radio-medicine and perform research,” Head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Fereydoun Abbasi told ISNA on Monday.

"To provide the fuel for these reactors, we need to continue with the 20-percent enrichment of uranium," he added.

Abbasi reiterated that fuel production or uranium enrichment to a purity level of 20 percent will not be halted, noting that the country “will produce fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor in due course.”

The AEOI chief also announced Iran's plans to build a new enrichment site and to increase the amount of uranium enriched up to the 20-percent level.

"We will boost the enrichment level of uranium up to 20 percent, based on the country's requirements, and in doing so, we will not seek anyone's permission," Abbasi emphasized.

He noted that Iran is carrying out its enrichment activities under the surveillance of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) while the agency's inspectors conduct “regular and even snap” inspections of the Islamic Republic's enrichment facilities.
The Iranian top nuclear official expressed optimism that the IAEA would cooperate with Tehran and “avoid listening to those who lack adequate and precise information and relay incorrect data to international bodies.”

Iran, a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and a member of the IAEA, insists on its legal right to utilize nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

Earlier on Sunday, Abbasi announced that Iran successfully produced and tested domestically-built second- and third-generation centrifuges.

“In line with optimization of centrifuge machines, aimed at increasing the separation power, second- and third-generation machines have also been produced and inspected, both of which have been successfully tested,” he said.

Also on Monday, Iran's top presidential advisor Mojtaba Samareh-Hashemi said that the project to produce nuclear fuel plates with a purity level of 20 percent is in its final stages.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/174371.html


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3.
Iran to Continue Nuclear Program Under IAEA Eyes
Xinhua News Agency
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)


Iranian officials said Tuesday that Iran will continue its nuclear activities under the supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), insisting that the country's "inalienable" nuclear rights should be recognized.

Iran's permanent representative to IAEA Ali-Asghar Soltanieh said Tuesday that Iran's nuclear facilities are regularly inspected by the IAEA and Iran is committed to continue its cooperation with the agency within the framework of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), semi-official Fars news agency reported.

However, Soltanieh said the IAEA has no right to inspect "Taba", which is the center for producing parts for centrifuges, arguing that the NPT does not require the inspection of plants producing centrifuge parts.

"According to the NPT (of which Iran is a signatory), there is no necessity for the inspection of the centers producing parts for centrifuges, including parts-producing Taba center, by the ( International Atomic Energy) agency," Soltanieh told Fars on the sidelines of a meeting held in Tehran's Khajeh Nasir Toosi University.

"Only centrifuges must be inspected, which is done regularly," he was quoted as saying.

"Iran has always been ready for non-conditional talks," Soltanieh said, referring to the next round of talks between Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (G5+1), and adding that "Iran's inalienable ( nuclear) rights should be recognized."

"There is also a principle that the space of the talks should be a space for cooperation, not confrontation," he added.

Fereidoon Abbasi, head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), said Iran is carrying out its enrichment activities under the IAEA's surveillance and the agency's inspectors conduct "regular and even snap" inspections of the Islamic republic's enrichment facilities, the local satellite Press TV reported Tuesday.

The nuclear chief expressed hope that the IAEA would cooperate with Tehran and "avoid listening to those who lack adequate and precise information and relay incorrect data to international bodies."

He announced that his country plans to build several nuclear research reactors following the successful production and testing of the second and third generations of Iranian-brand centrifuges.

"Iran plans to build four to five new reactors with a capacity of 10 to 20 megawatts in different provinces within the next few years to produce radio-medicine and perform research," Abbasi was quoted as saying.

Fuel production or uranium enrichment to a purity level of 20 percent will not be halted, Abbasi said, adding that the country " will produce fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor in due course."

"To provide the fuel for these reactors, we need to continue with the 20-percent enrichment of uranium," he said.

Abbasi also announced Iran's plans to build a new enrichment site and to increase the amount of uranium enriched up to the 20- percent level.

On Monday, Abbasi said the Fordo nuclear enrichment site near the city of Qom was ready to be equipped with centrifuges.

"Fordo site is ready to be equipped with centrifuges. Centrifuge machines are under construction and we will inform the (International Atomic Energy) agency ahead of the installation of centrifuges in the site," Abbasi told local ISNA news agency.

He also said the AEOI was installing the equipment required to turn uranium hexafluoride or UF6 into fuel plates for Tehran's Research Reactor, according to Press TV.

UF6 is used in uranium enrichment process that produces fuel for nuclear reactors.

Iran had earlier produced dummy fuel plates, Abbasi said, adding that Tehran had no problem producing fuel for the reactor.

Iran's top Presidential advisor Mojtaba Samareh-Hashemi said Tuesday that Iran would soon be among top countries that produce nuclear fuel rods, the official IRNA news agency reported.

Project on manufacturing nuclear fuel rods with a 20-percent purity is in its final stages of completion and the 20-percent fuel rods will be used at Tehran's Research Reactor, Samareh- Hashemi was quoted as saying.

In January, six world powers wrapped up crucial nuclear talks with Iran in Istanbul but failed to reach any agreement on the Iranian nuclear program.

The West suspects that Iran's uranium enrichment may be meant for producing nuclear weapons, which has been denied by Iranian officials.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-04/13/c_13825816.htm


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4.
Iran to Join Nuclear Fuel Plate Producers
PressTV
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)


Iran's top presidential advisor Mojtaba Samareh-Hashemi says the Islamic Republic of Iran will soon join those countries that produce nuclear fuel plates.

He told reporters on Monday that the project to produce fuel plates with 20 percent purity was in the final stages.

Samareh-Hashemi pointed out that the fuel plates will only be used for Tehran's Research Reactor, which produces radioisotopes for cancer patients.

The Iranian presidential advisor further explained that the plates will be launched according to the set timetable.

On Monday, Head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Fereydoun Abbasi said that the AEOI was installing the equipment required to turn uranium hexafluoride or UF6 into fuel plates for Tehran's Research Reactor.

UF6 is used in uranium enrichment process that produces fuel for nuclear reactors.

Abbasi said that Iran had earlier produced dummy fuel plates, adding that Tehran had no problem producing fuel for Tehran's reactor.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/174401.html


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B.  DPRK

1.
North Korea Won't Give Up Nuke Capability: U.S. General
Reuters
4/13/2011
(for personal use only)


North Korean leader Kim Jong-il is unlikely to bow to pressure to surrender his nuclear capability because he believes it is vital for "regime survival," the U.S. commander in South Korea said on Tuesday.

The comments by Admiral Walter Sharp at a Senate hearing came as a South Korean nuclear envoy visits Washington this week to discuss the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang, and ahead of a trip by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to Seoul.

North Korea has said it wants to return to six-party nuclear talks, but Seoul and Washington have questioned its sincerity -- pointing to revelations in November about major advances in Pyongyang's uranium enrichment program.

North Korea has tested nuclear devices in 2006 and 2009 and conducted long-range missile tests three times -- in 1998, 2006 and 2009.

Senator John McCain, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee, questioned whether there was any scenario under which Kim would give up his nuclear weapons capability.

"To answer your question directly: No, I do not see that he will give up his nuclear capability," Sharp said.

He prefaced his remarks by saying: "North Korea, I think, has clearly said that they are developing this nuclear capability. I think it is clear that Kim Jong-il believes he has to have it for regime survival."

A South Korean nuclear envoy is visiting Washington this week to meet top officials, including Deputy Secretary of State Jim Steinberg and Stephen Bosworth, the U.S. special representative for North Korea policy. Clinton travels to Seoul on Saturday and Sunday.

Tensions with North Korea rose to their highest since the 1950-53 Korean War after last year's sinking of a South Korean warship and the shelling of a South Korean island in the sea off the peninsula's west coast.

Sharp renewed U.S. warnings that the North may stage more attacks, but again stressed that the United States and South Korea would be prepared to respond if necessary. He said such strikes would be proportionate and only in self-defense.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/12/us-korea-usa-nuclear-idUSTRE73B6Y020110412


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2.
China Calls for Favorable Conditions for Resuming 6-way Talks
Yonhap News Agency
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)


China urged related parties on Tuesday to make efforts to create conditions for the resumption of long-stalled multilateral talks aimed at resolving North Korea's nuclear ambitions.

"China hopes that all parties concerned will make efforts to create conditions for resumption of the six-party talks," said Hong Lei, spokesman for the Chinese foreign ministry, according to the transcript of his semi-weekly press briefing, which was posted on the ministry's Web site.

"China urges South and North Korea to pursue peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula by improving their relationship through dialogue."

The six-party negotiations, designed to compensate the North for denuclearization, involves the two Koreas, the United States, Russia, Japan and China. The talks have been stalled since 2008.

Hong confirmed that Kim Kye-gwan, North Korea's chief nuclear envoy, visited China on the invitation of Zhang Zhijun, China's vice foreign minister, and met China's Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi and nuclear envoy Wu Dawei.

Kim flew to Beijing last week to meet with Chinese officials, coinciding with a trip to the Chinese capital by Kurt Campbell, U.S. assistant secretary of state for Asian and Pacific Affairs.

South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan visited Beijing at the end of March for talks with his counterpart Yang with the aim of narrowing differences over how to deal with North Korea's nuclear program.

South Korean foreign ministry spokesperson Cho Byung-jae said earlier on Tuesday that North Korea should first hold bilateral talks with South Korea that would pave the way for restarting six-party talks.

North Korea has traditionally shunned discussing its nuclear arms development with South Korea.

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/2011/04/12/95/0401000000AEN20110412011500320F.HTML


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3.
South Korea Presses North Korea for Bilateral Talks on Nukes
Yonhap News Agency
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)


North Korea should not be afraid to bring up its nuclear arms programs if it wants to hold a dialogue with South Korea that would pave the way for restarting six-party talks designed to compensate the North for denuclearization, an official said Tuesday.

The comment by South Korean foreign ministry spokesperson Cho Byung-jae came in a briefing in Seoul one day after Chinese nuclear envoy Wu Dawei reportedly proposed a step-by-step plan that includes a meeting of chief delegates of the two Koreas in the first stage.

Cho said he had yet to confirm the reported proposal that came after Wu met with his North Korean counterpart Kim Kye-gwan. But he said it would be "encouraging" if the North would agree to hold inter-Korean talks toward the cause of denuclearization.

North Korea has traditionally shunned discussing its nuclear arms development with South Korea, saying the activity is aimed at deterring threats of invasion from the United States.

Under the conservative Lee Myung-bak administration that took power in 2008, South Korea has retracted its tacit admission of the North Korean position, calling Pyongyang's nuclear program the single greatest threat to its national security.

"For the six-party talks to succeed, the North should first come out with the sincerity to resolve the problem through dialogue," Cho said. The six-party negotiations, involving the two Koreas, the U.S., Russia, Japan and China, have been stalled since 2008.

"Talks for the sake of talks will mean nothing," Cho said, adding his side remains open to dialogue as long as the North is ready to consider the South a genuine partner in denuclearization talks.

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/2011/04/12/66/0401000000AEN20110412008200315F.HTML


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C.  Japan

1.
World Right to Slam Nuke Program Mismanagement: Expert
The Japan Times
4/14/2011
(for personal use only)


Japan deserves international scorn for mismanaging its nuclear power program and unless the government acts quickly the odds of further catastrophes remain high, a leading seismologist said Wednesday.

"It was a matter of course that attempts by the Japanese government to operate nuclear power plants failed miserably," Kobe University professor Katsuhiko Ishibashi, who decades ago coined the term "Genpatsu-Shinsai" (Quake and Nuclear Disaster Complex), told a joint interview in Tokyo.

Ignoring the fact that approximately 10 percent of all the earthquakes on the planet take place near the archipelago was a fatal error, he said, adding that there is no such thing as comprehensive measures against quakes of the magnitude that struck the Tohoku region.

"Japan is the most dangerous place to construct a nuclear power plant," Ishibashi said.

Japan's nuclear program was bound to fail, considering how it ignored seismological history. Although studies of past temblors are crucial when it comes to choosing a site to construct a nuclear power plant, Ishibashi said such data were often ignored in the 1960s and '70s. A quick look in history textbooks would have shown that the Tohoku region is periodically hit by major earthquakes and tsunami.

"European countries that operate nuclear power plants take historical data much more seriously," Ishibashi said. But seismology took a back seat in Japan because successive govenrments prioritized locations where they could easily obtain land, win approval by local governments and quickly convince local fishermen and farmers.

Countries including Germany have rejected plans to construct nuclear plants due to the size of fault lines that would basically be ignored in Japan, Ishibashi said.

"Foreign governments and media should be condemning Tokyo for its reckless acts," he said.

Meanwhile, the March 11 quake may produce other major temblors, the expert warned.

Because of the unprecedented 9.0-magnitude quake, active fault lines all around the archipelago could be affected, he said. Under such circumstances, the greatest threat is a major earthquake in the Tokai region that seismologists predict is likely to take place soon.

"Such a scenario will definitely have an impact on the Hamaoka nuclear power plant," Ishibashi said. A catastrophe there is predicted to affect not only the central region of Japan but could also have an impact on Tokyo. "The U.S. military will also be affected - a disaster at Hamaoka will mean bases in Yokosuka, Yokota, Zama and Atsugi will all be of no use," he said.

Ishibashi has been active in warning of the dangers of operating nuclear power plants in earthquake-prone Japan for decades. On Feb. 23, 2005, he appeared before the Lower House Budget Committee and made a prophetic statement that a major earthquake would induce multiple failures and a variety of breakdowns in nuclear power plants.

He also predicted that the overheating of reactor cores could cause a hydrogen explosion, as was the case at 3 of the nuclear reactors at Fukushima No. 1.In regards to the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, Ishibashi warned there is a chance the situation could go from bad to worse. The possibility of a major aftershock hitting the region, followed by another killer tsunami, "is not zero," he said, regretting that his warnings went unheeded for years.

Available at:
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110414a6.html


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2.
Government May Have Other Utilities Share TEPCO's Compensation Burden
Yomiuri Shimbun
4/13/2011
(for personal use only)


The government is considering a plan to form a mutual aid system that would include Tokyo Electric Power Co. and all other power companies in the nation to pay compensation to people who suffered from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, it has been learned.

The mutual aid system is modeled after the compensation program established for damage caused by the 1979 nuclear accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station in the United States.

According to the government's draft plan, each power company might be assessed 30 billion yen to 50 billion yen for each of their nuclear reactors, though the actual amount could be negotiated later.

TEPCO, the operator of the crippled nuclear plant, would be required to pay as much as 2 trillion yen to 3.8 trillion yen in total, including its contribution to the system plus other obligations.

Compensation in excess of the total amount borne by the power companies would be fully covered by the government, according to the draft plan.

The government is considering the creation of a special law to establish the compensation program, sources said. The government and TEPCO will soon start talks over how to pay for the damages.

According to the draft plan, TEPCO would pay 100 billion yen to 200 billion yen every year from its annual profit for 15 years to pay for damages. In addition, it would pay 510 billion yen to 850 billion yen for the mutual aid program, representing the charge assessed for its 17 nuclear reactors.

The other power companies own a total of 37 nuclear reactors around Japan. Each company will pay a charge based on the number of nuclear reactors it owns. The total charges borne by the nation's nine power companies would be 1.1 trillion yen to 1.8 trillion yen.

The government will shoulder up to 240 billion yen based on the Law on Compensation for Nuclear Damages. In addition, if the total compensation required exceeds the amount shouldered by the utilities, the excess would be fully covered by the government, according to the draft plan.

However, power companies not related to the crippled Fukushima plant are likely to protest strongly if they are required to share the compensation burden with TEPCO.

Available at:
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110413005848.htm


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3.
Nuclear Crisis Upgraded to '7': Fukushima Accident Boosted to Top Level of Global Scale
Yomiuri Shimbun
4/13/2011
(for personal use only)


The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency raised the provisional severity level of the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on Tuesday to the worst rating of seven on an international scale, equivalent to that of the 1986 Chernobyl crisis.

The agency had previously rated the accident as a five.

The agency, under the Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry, said the amount of radioactive material, calculated based on the reactors' estimated condition, reached "more than several tens of thousands of terabecquerels."

A terabecquerel equals 1 trillion becquerels.

The level is defined as a "major accident" under the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES), or the highest level on its scale from zero to seven.

According to the agency, the total amount of iodine-131 and cesium-137 emitted between March 11 and at 11 a.m. Tuesday reached 370,000 terabecquerels according to the reactors' estimated condition. Within this assessment, cesium levels were converted to their equivalent in iodine-131 levels.

Cabinet Office's Nuclear Safety Commission, meanwhile, announced Tuesday that the total amount of iodine and cesium emitted between March 11 and April 5 was 630,000 terabecquerels (again, with cesium levels converted to the iodine equivalent), calculated according to the amount of radiation observed around the facility.

"The total amount of radioactive materials emitted thus far is equal to about 10 percent of that released in the Chernobyl accident. The amount of radiation exposure is small," said Agency spokesman Hidehiko Nishiyama.

According to the commission, the current volume of radioactivity being emitted is about one-ten thousandth of that monitored at its peak.

The agency decided to raise the INES level not only because of the calculated radiative material released into the atmosphere but also because of the widespread ramifications of the accident.

Available at:
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110412006650.htm


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4.
WHO Eyes 20 Year Nuclear Health Watch in Japan
AFP
4/13/2011
(for personal use only)


The World Health Organisation is seeking studies for up to 20 years to keep watch over public health in Japan following the Fukushima nuclear emergency, a senior official said on Wednesday.

WHO environmental health chief Maria Neira played down a current risk to public health outside the 30-kilometre exclusion zone around the Fukushima Daiichi plant, based on tests and monitoring by Japanese authorities.

"There is no need for new public health measures," Neira told journalists.

She nonetheless underlined that the UN health agency could not let its guard drop while the radiation emergency at the plant was underway, as the WHO maintained permanent monitoring with the Japanese and global detection networks.

"This is an evolving situation and we need to assess and reassess almost on a one-hour basis, because the situation is unfortunately not yet under control and we do not know what might happen," Neira told journalists.

"Obviously we continue to be very vigilant, we never came down our level of alert, and we continue to monitor in a very careful way how the situation is moving; our assessment might change in one hour, I don't know," Neira told journalists.

Japan upgraded its month-old nuclear emergency on Tuesday to a maximum seven on an international scale of atomic crises, placing it on a par with the Chernobyl disaster a quarter-century ago.

The WHO understood that the change was not made because of public health concerns, Neira said.

"It's clear that this 30-kilometre area provides the best shield for the protection of the population," she added, while emphasising that the WHO was also starting to consider potential future health consequences of the emergency.

"We need to start to put the basis for the studies that need to be conducted for the next 10 to 20 years," the WHO director of public health and environment said.

"It may be too early because we are still in the very acute phase of detection for human health but we are discussing with Japan."

Japanese authorities have screened thyroid functions in more than 940 children, with the results "all under the dose that represent risk," she emphasised.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5ieUoHlvyxXFcV3Xhw25tD2TTwTnQ?docId=CNG.7e0554b2bf89d7acd100b75548bac138.b61


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D.  Nuclear Safety

1.
Seoul, Beijing Pledge Cooperation on Nuclear Safety
Arirang News
4/14/2011
(for personal use only)


Korea and China have agreed to strengthen cooperation and info-sharing in case of an emergency to ensure nuclear safety.

At the bilateral meeting between Korean Prime Minister Kim Hwang-sik and his Chinese counterpart, Wen Jiabao, on Wednesday the topic of nuclear safety emerged as the two countries are closely monitoring neighboring Japan's response to its ongoing nuclear crisis.

At the meeting the two prime ministers spoke highly of the strategic partnership the two countries have developed and exchanged ideas to further promote cooperation in economy, trade and inter-Korean affairs.

Wednesday marked the second day of Prime Minister Kim's four-day visit to Beijing.

Available at:
http://www.arirang.co.kr/News/News_View.asp?nseq=114881&code=Ne2&category=2


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E.  Nuclear Energy

1.
France’s Areva to Support NPP Belene Construction
Standart News
4/14/2011
(for personal use only)


French energy company Areva signed a memorandum for cooperation with the Bulgarian energy holding (BEH) in the presence of PM Boyko Borissov. The fields of cooperation include the highest nuclear safety standards and renewable energy sources.

“We are hiring the best experts in the world, and we will also need a nuclear lobby before Brussels,” Mr. Borissov said.

Areva’s experts are expected to advise the Bulgarian government how to proceed with the realization of the NPP Belene project.

Anne Lauvergeon, President of the Executive Board of AREVA group, thanked Bulgaria’s Economy Minister Traycho Traykov and Ambassadors Marin Raykov of Bulgaria and Philippe Autie of France for their cooperation.

Borissov notified Areva of the latest documents signed by Bulgaria’s national electric utility NEC and Russia’s Atomstroyexport regarding the postponement of the NPP Belene project realization, and of the contract that the Bulgarian government signed with HSBC, drawing the British bank as a consultant on the project.

Available at:
http://paper.standartnews.com/en/article.php?d=2011-04-14&article=36035


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2.
Poland Not to Give Up Nuclear Program: Senior Official
Xinhua News Agency
4/13/2011
(for personal use only)


Poland will not give up its nuclear program, Polish Government Commissioner for Nuclear Power Industry Hanna Trojanowska told a conference here on Tuesday.

The conference was attended by cooperators of the Westinghouse concern in Warsaw. The main topic of discussions was the impact of the crisis at the Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant on nuclear business.

Westinghouse, along with GE-Hitachi and France's Arvey, are potential suppliers of technology to Poland's first nuclear power plant.

The Fukushima accident in Japan threatened a halt of nuclear power industry development. "I want to declare that we will not give up our nuclear program," Trojanowska said, cited by the PAP news agency.

Fifty years of successful operation of nuclear power plants in the world show that nuclear energy is a rational choice. "Nuclear program implementation in Poland is an important element of diversification of our energy sources," the minister added.

The government's task is to identify dangers and find ways to avoid them at every stage of the nuclear project, said Trojanowska.

Under government proposals, the first block of Poland's first nuclear power plant should go into operation in 2020. By 2030 two nuclear power stations are planned to be built, each with the capacity of some 3,000 MW.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-04/13/c_13825847.htm


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F.  Links of Interest

1.
A Survey of the World's Radioactive No-Go Zones
Der Spiegel
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)
http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,756369,00.html


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2.
Areva Sends 20 Specialists to Help Tepco With Reactor Crisis
Bloomberg
4/12/2011
(for personal use only)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-12/areva-sends-20-specialists-to-help-..


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DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Readers are encouraged to visit the websites from which the source material originates. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of Partnership for Global Security. Partnership for Global Security takes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

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