Partnership for Global Security: Leading the World to a Safer Future
Home Projects Publications Issues Official Documents About RANSAC Nuclear News 4/15/13
Location: Home / Projects & Publications / News
Sitemap Contact
Search
Google www PGS
 
Nuclear News - 2/17/2011
PGS Nuclear News, February 17, 2011
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Iran to Unveil Project Soon to "Surprise World": IRGC Chief, Xinhua News Agency (2/16/2011)
    2. Stuxnet Rattled Iran But Atom Work Goes On: Report, Fredrik Dahl, Reuters (2/16/2011)
    3. Iran Says Sanction Measures "Pointless": President, Xinhua News Agency (2/16/2011)
    4. Iran Entitled to Peaceful Nuclear Energy, PressTV (2/16/2011)
    5. US Examining if Venezuela Violates Iran Sanctions, AFP (2/15/2011)
    6. Turkey Says Next Iranian Nuclear Talks Likely to Be in Istanbul, Bloomberg (2/15/2011)
B.  DPRK
    1. Japan, South Korea Urge UN to Discuss North Korea, AFP (2/16/2011)
    2. Experts Tell VOA That North Korean Missile Site is Completed, VOA News (2/16/2011)
    3. South Korean FM Leaves for Japan for Talks on North Korea, Bilateral Relations, Yonhap News Agency (2/16/2011)
C.  Nuclear Cooperation
    1. Ukraine, U.S. Sign Agreement on Nuclear Security, Interfax (2/16/2011)
    2. Russian, U.S. Generals to Discuss Nuclear Terrorism in Lisbon, RIA Novosti (2/16/2011)
    3. South Korea, U.S. to Hold Talks on Rewriting Nuclear Cooperation Accord, Xinhua News Agency (2/15/2011)
    4. Syria Still Stonewalling UN Nuclear Probe: Diplomats, AFP (2/15/2011)
D.  Nuclear Energy
    1. KEPCO Consortium Signs $1.43bn UAE Power Plant Deal, AFP (2/16/2011)
    2. Japan Atomic Power to Carry Out Study on Vietnam Plant, Bloomberg (2/16/2011)
    3. Syria Says Mulls First Nuclear Power Plant by 2020, Fredrik Dahl, Reuters (2/15/2011)
E.  Links of Interest
    1. China Enters Race to Develop Nuclear Energy from Thorium, Duncan Clark, The Guardian (2/16/2011)
    2. Defector Admits 'Fabricating' Iraq WMD Intel, AFP (2/15/2011)



A.  Iran

1.
Iran Entitled to Peaceful Nuclear Energy
PressTV
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of Italy's Senate Lamberto Dini has thrown his country's weight behind Iran's peaceful nuclear program.

Iran has an absolute right to use nuclear energy for peaceful applications, Dini said in a meeting with Chairman of the National Security and Foreign Policy Committee of Iran's Parliament (Majlis) Alaeddin Boroujerdi in the Italian capital city of Rome on Tuesday.

He added that Iran is a peaceful country and has never attacked any country in the past century, IRNA reported.

The Italian senator emphasized that Iran is an “important and influential” country in the region and called for enhanced parliamentary cooperation with Tehran.

Boroujerdi, who is heading a delegation to Rome, arrived in the Italian capital on Tuesday on a two-day visit for talks with a number of Italy's senior political and parliamentary officials.

The two sides are scheduled to discuss the latest political developments in the Middle East, ways to strengthen cooperation in war-torn Afghanistan and the fight against illicit drugs and issues of mutual concern.

Iran has always emphasized that as a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and a member of the International Atomic Energy Agency, it has the right to utilize peaceful nuclear technology.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/165458.html


Return to Menu


2.
Iran Says Sanction Measures "Pointless": President
Xinhua News Agency
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said that the sanction measures adopted by UN against the Islamic republic over its nuclear program are "pointless," the English language Press TV reported on Wednesday.

President Ahmadinejad downplayed the impact of sanctions and said that in the modern world, where economies are so competitive, such kind of punitive measures are pointless, said the report.

The sanctions imposed on the country may have caused prices to increase in a few cases, but they will decrease in the near future, he said, adding that Iran's economy is flourishing.

Ahmadinejad noted that these sanctions will eventually benefit the national economy, since Iran has attained self-sufficiency in many areas, according to Press TV.

Iran is under sanction pressures by the United States, European Union and other western countries over its controversial nuclear program which the West believe are moving to the atomic weaponry developments. However, Tehran denied the allegations, claiming that its nuclear program is for civilian and peaceful purpose.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-02/16/c_13734924.htm


Return to Menu


3.
Iran to Unveil Project Soon to "Surprise World": IRGC Chief
Xinhua News Agency
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Chief of Iran's Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) said Wednesday that IRGC will unveil a project soon to "surprise the world," the force's website Sepahnews reported.

In the near future, the miracle-like project will be unveiled and inaugurated which will surprise the world,Major General Mohammad Ali Jafari, the chief commander of IRGC was quoted as saying.

Jafari made the remarks at a celebration held by IRGC here to mark the victory of Islamic revolution 32 years ago.

He said IRGC has made considerable progress in scientific researches as well as military and defense projects, but he did not elaborate on the nature of the project to be unveiled.

"The projects which are currently underway in the country will surprise the world if they are concluded," he was quoted as saying.

IRGC, a branch of Iran's military founded after the Iranian revolution in 1979 to safeguard the Islamic revolution, has conducted several economic, military and scientific projects in the recent years.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-02/16/c_13735230.htm


Return to Menu


4.
Stuxnet Rattled Iran But Atom Work Goes On: Report
Fredrik Dahl
Reuters
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


The Stuxnet computer worm caused relatively limited damage to Iran's nuclear program and failed to stop the Islamic republic stockpiling enriched uranium, a U.S.-based think-tank said in a report.

Stuxnet is believed to have knocked out in late 2009 or early 2010 about 1,000 centrifuges -- machines used to refine uranium -- out of the 9,000 used at Iran's Natanz enrichment plant, the Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) said.

Security experts say Stuxnet may have been an attempt by Iran's enemies to sabotage the nuclear program, which Western nations fear is intended to produce weapons despite Tehran's denials. The worm, which has been described as a guided cyber missile, possibly originated in Israel or the United States.

"Although Stuxnet appears to be designed to destroy centrifuges at the Natanz facility, destruction was by no means total," ISIS experts David Albright, Paul Brannan and Christina Walrond wrote in the analysis dated February 15.

"Assuming Iran exercises caution, Stuxnet is unlikely to destroy more centrifuges at the Natanz plant. Iran likely cleaned the malware from its control systems."

Enriched uranium can be used to fuel nuclear power plants, which is Iran's stated aim, or provide material for bombs if processed much further. Western powers accuse Iran, a major oil producer, of seeking to develop nuclear weapons capability.

Any setbacks in Iran's enrichment campaign could buy more time for efforts to find a diplomatic solution to its stand-off with world powers, even though talks in Geneva in December and Istanbul last month failed to bridge the gap.

STEADY ENRICHMENT

Israel and the United States have not ruled out military action if diplomacy fails to resolve the dispute.

ISIS said cyber attacks such as Stuxnet were likely to continue in the absence of a negotiated settlement. "They provide an alternative to military strikes against Iran's known nuclear sites, a tactic that most see as likely to be ineffectual or counterproductive," the report said.

The cyber attack that is believed to have destroyed centrifuges at Natanz about a year ago "rattled the Iranians."

But Iran took steps that probably reduced further damage by Stuxnet and shut down many centrifuges -- finely calibrated cylindrical devices that spin at supersonic speed to increase the fissile element in uranium -- for months, ISIS added.

"While it has delayed the Iranian centrifuge program at the Natanz plant in 2010 and contributed to slowing its expansion, it did not stop it or even delay the continued buildup of LEU (low-enriched uranium)," the report said.

Stuxnet did not lower Iran's output of refined uranium last year, even though it could help to explain why quantities did not increase significantly. "The relatively limited damage implies that destroying centrifuges through a cyber attack may be more difficult to do than commonly perceived," it added.

Iran's atomic activities have also been suffering from design-related technical problems and increasingly tough sanctions which make it more difficult for Tehran to acquire the equipment and other materials it needs for its enrichment work.

Despite such problems, diplomats and experts say Iran has resumed steady enrichment after a brief halt and that it has now has amassed enough LEU for one or two bombs if refined much further.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/16/us-nuclear-iran-stuxnet-idUSTRE71F1X720110216


Return to Menu


5.
Turkey Says Next Iranian Nuclear Talks Likely to Be in Istanbul
Bloomberg
2/15/2011
(for personal use only)


The next round of talks on Iran’s nuclear program is likely to take place in Istanbul, Turkey’s state-run Anatolia news agency cited Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu as saying in the Iranian capital.

Davutoglu met Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi and Iran’s chief nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, today in Tehran, where they worked to set a date and place for the negotiations between Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council -- China, France, Russia, the U.K. and U.S. -- as well as Germany. Davutoglu didn’t give a date for further talks on Iran’s atomic development, Anatolia said.

The previous session ended Jan. 22 in Istanbul with no breakthrough, nor any commitment by the parties to meet again. The Security Council approved a fourth set of sanctions against Iran in June over its refusal to curb the nuclear work, which the U.S. and many of its allies say may be a cover for weapons development. Iran says its program is designed to produce nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

European Union Foreign Policy Chief Catherine Ashton said she was “disappointed” after the Iranians issued new conditions, including the lifting of sanctions, before discussing their nuclear program in Istanbul. She said the international community would be left to decide how to deal with Iran if talks continued to produce no result.

Davutoglu is in Iran with Turkish President Abdullah Gul and more than 100 Turkish business leaders seeking to expand trade between the two neighboring countries.

Gul and Davutoglu held a meeting today with Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad that was closed to the press, Anatolia said.

Available at:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-02-15/turkey-says-next-iranian-nuclear-talks-likely-to-be-in-istanbul.html


Return to Menu


6.
US Examining if Venezuela Violates Iran Sanctions
AFP
2/15/2011
(for personal use only)


A top US official said Tuesday that Washington is closely examining whether Venezuela's cooperation with Iran on energy issues violates international sanctions on the Tehran regime.

Arturo Valenzuela, the top State Department diplomat for Latin America, told a congressional panel that "we are looking at that issue" and that the US administration is "trying to determine if in fact there is a violation."

The comments came under questioning from Republican Representative Connie Mack, who heads a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere.

"It is something we continue to monitor closely," the diplomat said.

The US administration last year said it was monitoring the energy cooperation deals made between Iran and Venezuela, whose President Hugo Chavez is a vocal critic of Washington.

Chavez last October signed 11 deals in Tehran focused on energy cooperation between the two major oil producers and US foes.

Chavez and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad both denounced American "imperialism" and called for a "new world order" during the visit, part of the South American leader's international tour aimed at strengthening Venezuela's economic ties with eastern Europe and the Middle East.

The Iran regime has been slapped with a series of sanctions by the United Nations for its nuclear program, suspected of being used for weapons despite Tehran's denials.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jsOy1cHUUFPiJ8xLl-nlM7Ohq-Sw?docId=CNG.45ed54b37a8da7196eec4d99230b920e.a71


Return to Menu


B.  DPRK

1.
Experts Tell VOA That North Korean Missile Site is Completed
VOA News
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Satellite image analysts say pictures taken during the last month show that North Korea has completed a sophisticated space launch facility that could be used to launch an intercontinental ballistic missile.

The images, which have been viewed by VOA, show a completed launch tower and accompanying buildings at a site at Tongchangdong in northwestern North Korea. Image analyst Tim Brown at Global Image.org tells VOA that the tower and launch pad “are basically finished.”

Brown says the launch site, which could be used for either a space or missile launch, is much more sophisticated than North Korea's previous launch facility at Musudan-ri.

Pyongyang has still not successfully tested an intercontinental missile that can reach far outside of Northeast Asia. But U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said last month he believes North Korea will be able to strike the United States with a missile within five years.

North Korea has also stockpiled plutonium from a nuclear reactor and has an operational uranium enrichment program. It has conducted two nuclear weapons tests, but it is not known how close it is to developing a nuclear warhead that could be mounted on a missile.

Available at:
http://blogs.voanews.com/breaking-news/2011/02/16/experts-tell-voa-that-north-korean-missile-site-is-completed/


Return to Menu


2.
Japan, South Korea Urge UN to Discuss North Korea
AFP
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Japan and South Korea's foreign ministers said on Wednesday that the UN Security Council should take up the issue of North Korea's uranium enrichment programme with a view to possible punishment.

Seiji Maehara of Japan and Kim Sung-hwan of South Korea told a news conference that the North must take concrete steps to give up its nuclear programmes as it had previously agreed.

"We confirmed that North Korea's uranium enrichment programme is a violation of a UN Security Council resolution and a joint statement under six party talks," Maehara said at the close of a meeting with Kim in Tokyo.

"We agreed that the international community's concerns over uranium enrichment should be taken up at an appropriate forum like the UN Security Council," Maehara said.

Tokyo and Seoul will work with Washington to persuade others to bring North Korea before the global body, Maehara said.

China opposes taking the issue to the Security Council.

Beijing wants six-party disarmament talks revived as part of a process to ease tensions on the peninsula. But the United States and Japan say Pyongyang must mend ties first with Seoul.

Kim said Seoul was keeping its door open for talks with Pyongyang but "the North must show its sincere attitude" to make progress in improving relations.

"We don't believe in holding talks for the sake of holding talks," Kim said.

North Korea showed off its new enrichment programme to visiting US experts in November.

It says the plant will be part of a peaceful nuclear power project, but experts say it could easily be reconfigured to produce material for atomic weapons.

The six-nation talks grouping China, the United States, the two Koreas, Russia and Japan, have been in stasis since December 2008.

The UN Security Council has ordered the North to shut down all atomic activities following two tests of plutonium bombs.

The tense ties between the two Koreas deteriorated further following the North's shelling of a South Korean island on November 23, which killed four people including two civilians and briefly raised fears of all-out war.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5in4fkmIED2RScD-1PmG3gd2nlibg?docId=CNG.603a9efadd0bcd2842eeb2db6ed43c73.541


Return to Menu


3.
South Korean FM Leaves for Japan for Talks on North Korea, Bilateral Relations
Yonhap News Agency
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan left for Japan on Wednesday for talks with his counterpart on North Korea, its nuclear programs and bilateral relations.

Kim and Japanese Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara are expected to reaffirm in their meeting set for later Wednesday that reducing tensions between the two Koreas should be the first step for engagement with Pyongyang and that Japanese-North Korean dialogue should come after that.

The two top diplomats are also expected to talk about Pyongyang's new uranium enrichment nuclear program, denouncing it as a violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions and stressing that the international community should deal sternly with it.

South Korea has been pressuring North Korea to apologize for last year's two deadly attacks -- the November shelling of the South's border island of Yeonpyeong and the March sinking of the South's warship Cheonan. Dozens of people were killed in the attacks.

Seoul is concerned that Pyongyang could get a wrong message if any other nation begins dialogue with the communist nation at a time when the provocative regime refuses to take responsibility for the two attacks and tensions remain high on the Korean Peninsula.

Such concern arose earlier this year when Maehara expressed a willingness to hold direct talks with North Korea, saying he wanted to tackle Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs and past abductions of Japanese nationals. Pyongyang welcomed the suggestion.

But Maehara made clear during a trip to Seoul last month that inter-Korean dialogue should take the highest priority.

North Korea's uranium enrichment program is also expected to be a key topic.

South Korea has been mustering international support for its push to take the matter to the U.N. Security Council. China is the biggest hurdle for the move as Beijing believes the move could aggravate tensions and insists that it should be discussed at six-party talks.

Kim's two-day trip will also include a visit to Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan and a series of meetings with Japanese politicians, including Sengoku Yoshito, acting president of the ruling Democratic Party, and Sadakazu Tanigaki, president of the opposition Liberal Democratic Party.

Relations between South Korea and Japan have been in good shape after Kan offered a renewed apology in August for Tokyo's 1910-45 colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula, promising to return centuries-old royal Korean books to Seoul and take other steps backing up the apology.

Kim and Maehara are expected to discuss follow-up measures for the planned return of the cultural assets and other projects.

Kim is also expected to ask Japan to make sure upcoming results of the country's review of new middle school textbooks will not hurt ties between the two countries.

Japanese school texts accused of glorifying the country's wartime past have long been considered a thorn in relations between Seoul and Tokyo as resentment about the colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula still runs deep among South Koreans.

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/national/2011/02/16/69/0301000000AEN20110216001300315F.HTML


Return to Menu


C.  Nuclear Cooperation

1.
Russian, U.S. Generals to Discuss Nuclear Terrorism in Lisbon
RIA Novosti
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Russian and U.S. generals will meet in Lisbon in June to discuss cooperation between the two countries in fighting nuclear terrorism, the head of the Russian Military Commanders Club said on Wednesday.

The discussion will take place as part of a meeting of the Elba international military commanders club, Gen. Anatoly Kulikov said.

The talks will continue the three-day discussion held in October last year in Istanbul, which involved five Russian and five U.S. generals, he said.

The Russian Military Commanders Club, involving more than 2,000 members, was created in January 2005 with support of then-Russian President Vladimir Putin and security services heads.

Available at:
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20110216/162632250.html


Return to Menu


2.
Ukraine, U.S. Sign Agreement on Nuclear Security
Interfax
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Ukrainian Foreign Minister Kostiantyn Hryschenko have signed an agreement on nuclear security in Washington, the U.S. Department of State said in a press release.

The purpose of the agreement is to intensify cooperation in the sphere of protecting vulnerable nuclear materials and the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Ukraine has confirmed its promise to get rid of highly enriched uranium by 2012, when a nuclear security summit is due to take place.

The U.S., in turn, has confirmed its intention to provide to Ukraine financial and technical assistance valued at approximately $50 million.

Available at:
http://www.interfax.com.ua/eng/main/61183/


Return to Menu


3.
South Korea, U.S. to Hold Talks on Rewriting Nuclear Cooperation Accord
Xinhua News Agency
2/15/2011
(for personal use only)


South Korea and the United States are planning to hold a second round of talks next month in Seoul over civilian uses of nuclear energy, local media reported Tuesday citing an unspecified diplomatic source.

The talks, aimed at replacing their nuclear cooperation pact set to expire in 2014, will likely be led by Cho Hyun, the deputy foreign minister for multilateral and global affairs, and Robert Einhorn, a special advisor for nonproliferation and arms control at the U.S. State Department, according to Yonhap News Agency. The first round of talks was held in Washington last October.

The bilateral agreement, struck in 1974, stops Seoul from reprocessing spent fuel or enriching uranium on nonproliferation grounds, but Seoul now wants authorization to do so under a new pact.

South Korea relies on atomic power for 40 percent of its electricity.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-02/15/c_13733341.htm


Return to Menu


4.
Syria Still Stonewalling UN Nuclear Probe: Diplomats
AFP
2/15/2011
(for personal use only)


Syria has snubbed a request by UN atomic watchdog chief Yukiya Amano for prompt access to a suspect nuclear site and a number of other locations, diplomats said on Tuesday.

After more than two years of deadlock on the issue, Syria could therefore find itself under intensified scrutiny at a meeting of the 35-member board of governors of the Viennna-based International Atomic Energy Agency next month.

A number of countries could start even pushing for a possible resolution against Damascus or perhaps table the idea of a so-called "special inspection", a rarely-used tool that allows UN inspectors to request more intrusive access to sites, the diplomats told AFP, speaking on condition of anonymity.

And if Syria were to block that request, it could face possible referral to the UN Security Council.

The IAEA has been investigating allegations since 2008 that Syria had been building an undeclared reactor at a remote desert site called Dair Alzour until it was bombed by Israeli planes in September 2007.

Damascus granted UN inspectors one-off access to the site in June 2008 but no follow-up visits to either Dair Alzour or other possible related sites since then.

On the basis of that one visit, the IAEA has already said the building bore some of the characteristics of a nuclear facility.

UN inspectors also detected "significant" traces of man-made uranium there, as yet unexplained by Damascus.

In what diplomats saw at the time as a sign of Amano's growing impatience, the watchdog chief sent a letter to Syria's foreign ministry on November 18 asking the government to provide the IAEA with prompt access to relevant information and locations" connected to an alleged nuclear site.

Amano himself described it as the first time that an IAEA director general had contacted the Syrian government directly with regard to the agency's probe.

Nevertheless, Syria "has failed so far to come up with any of the information or access that Amano was looking for," one western diplomat said.

The United States, in particular, could be among those pushing for a special inspection.

On December 2, a number of US lawmakers wrote to President Barack Obama askimg him to press the IAEA for such a move.

But some diplomats here caution against using such a tool at this stage.

The last time the IAEA resorted to such a measure was in North Korea in 1993. Pyongyang defied the request and subsequently went on to develop a nuclear weapon capacity.

"So, the question here is what action could the IAEA could take if Syria similarly refused," one diplomat said.

The IAEA board of governors is scheduled to convene for its traditional spring meeting from March 7-11, where, alongside the Syrian issue, the long-running probe into Iran's controversial nuclear programme will once again dominate discussions.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hS27_F38EoPBScUe5gTytNUmBYyA?docId=CNG.b978b2a5641ec8274ff266b21636a58b.581


Return to Menu


D.  Nuclear Energy

1.
Japan Atomic Power to Carry Out Study on Vietnam Plant
Bloomberg
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


Japan Atomic Power Co. signed a preliminary agreement with Vietnam Electricity Holding Co. to carry out a feasibility study for Vietnam’s second nuclear plant.

Japan Atomic and the Vietnamese company plan to sign a final agreement by the end of March to conduct the study after Vietnam Electricity provides more information, Japan Atomic spokesman Mitsuru Marutani said today.

The study, which may take between 12 and 18 months, will assess the suitability of the planned location of the station and the type of reactor to be used, Marutani said.

Vietnam agreed to make Japan a partner in building the nuclear plant in Ninh Thuan province in southern Vietnam in October. Japan Atomic Power Co. is owned by utilities including Tokyo Electric Power Co., Asia’s biggest electricity company.

Available at:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-02-16/japan-atomic-power-to-carry-out-study-on-vietnam-plant-update1-.html


Return to Menu


2.
KEPCO Consortium Signs $1.43bn UAE Power Plant Deal
AFP
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)


A consortium grouping Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO) and Japan's Sumitomo Corp. has signed a $1.43 billion deal to build a thermal power plant in the United Arab Emirates, the South Korean firm said Wednesday.

Under the deal with the Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority (ADWEA), the consortium will construct a gas thermal power plant in Shuweihat city, 260 km (162 miles) west of Abu Dhabi, KEPCO said in a statement.

It will raise funds through borrowing from South Korean, Japanese and other foreign banks by May and the plant will be completed in March 2014.

The costs will be recovered by selling electrity produced at the plant to Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Co, a wholly owned unit of ADWEA, for 25 years.

The consortium was picked as preferred bidder for the plant last October.

A KEPCO-led consortium also won a $20.4 billion deal in 2009 to build four nuclear power plants in the UAE.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iTZx2rTke3t_E6OrCLndAq4L7_9A?docId=CNG.aa2ad40588dbe52d1b69bebde2d875ed.561


Return to Menu


3.
Syria Says Mulls First Nuclear Power Plant by 2020
Fredrik Dahl
Reuters
2/15/2011
(for personal use only)


Syria is considering building its first nuclear power plant by 2020 to meet rapidly growing electricity demand, a document from the Arab state's Atomic Energy Commission showed.

The paper posted on the website of the International Atomic Energy Agency did not say whether Syria, which is under IAEA investigation over suspected covert nuclear activity, may also contemplate making its own fuel for such a facility. Any bid by Syria to launch uranium enrichment, like its ally Iran, would likely further alarm the United States and its Western allies about Damascus' atomic activities as such material can also be used to make bombs if refined much more.

Russia said in May last year, during a visit to Damascus by President Dmitry Medvedev, that it was studying building an atomic power plant in Syria.

Syrian officials have given no details since then and none was available to comment on Tuesday.

"In principle, building a nuclear power plant, as long as you don't use it as a pretext to develop the whole fuel cycle ...shouldn't be a major concern," said Pierre Goldschmidt, a former head of global inspections at the IAEA.

Countries have the right to develop nuclear energy provided they comply with their commitments under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the facilities are under IAEA oversight.

"Of course, Syria does not lead very much by example because they don't allow the agency to access some of the sites the agency wishes to visit," Goldschmidt added.

The IAEA, the U.N. nuclear body, has voiced growing frustration at what it sees as lack of Syrian cooperation with a probe into a desert site bombed to rubble by Israel in 2007.

U.S. intelligence reports have said the Dair Alzour facility was a nascent North Korean-designed nuclear reactor intended to produce weapons-grade plutonium.

Available at:
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/02/15/nuclear-syria-plant-idUKLDE71C0HJ20110215


Return to Menu


E.  Links of Interest

1.
China Enters Race to Develop Nuclear Energy from Thorium
Duncan Clark
The Guardian
2/16/2011
(for personal use only)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2011/feb/16/china-nuclear-thorium


Return to Menu


2.
Defector Admits 'Fabricating' Iraq WMD Intel
AFP
2/15/2011
(for personal use only)
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jVGgo2K48JTOSUM7RsBrZqx1A..


Return to Menu


DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Readers are encouraged to visit the websites from which the source material originates. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of Partnership for Global Security. Partnership for Global Security takes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

To be automatically removed from our mailing list, click on the following link: Remove Me From The List

If you have questions/comments/concerns, please reply to news@partnershipforglobalsecurity.org



Section Menu:
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999


© 2007 Partnership for Global Security. All rights reserved. Privacy Statement.