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Nuclear News - 9/7/2010
PGS Nuclear News, September 7, 2010
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Iran Calls on IAEA Not to Surrender to U.S. Pressures: MP, Xinhua News Agency (9/6/2010)
    2. Israel, U.S. Not Dare Attack Iran - Ahmadinejad, RIA Novosti (9/6/2010)
    3. Blair: War on Iran Has To Be an Option, PressTV (9/6/2010)
    4. Iran Says Japan Deprived from Using Iran's Potentials by Sanctions, Xinhua News Agency (9/5/2010)
    5. Iran is Being Sanctioned for Crimes It Didn't Commit, Haaretz (9/5/2010)
B.  DPRK
    1. U.S. Unenthusiastic About Resumption of 6-Party Talks, The Chosun Ilbo (9/6/2010)
    2. Members Building Up Momentum for North Korea Nuke Talks, The Korea Herald (9/6/2010)
    3. U.S. Nuclear Envoy to Visit This Week, The Korea Herald (9/5/2010)
C.  Nuclear Cooperation
    1. Jordan, Japan to Sign Nuclear Cooperation Agreement This Week, Nayla Razzouk, Business Week (9/6/2010)
    2. Nuclear Safety Experts Convene in Amman, Taylor Luck, The Jordan Times (9/6/2010)
    3. Italy, Korea Embark on 1st Nuclear Energy Workshop, The Korea Herald (9/5/2010)
    4. Vietnam and Russia to Co-operate on Nuclear Power, Nhan Dan (9/4/2010)
D.  Nuclear Energy
    1. Invensys in Talks on Chinese Nuclear Power Deals, Reuters (9/6/2010)
    2. European Union's Oettinger says German Nuclear Deal Fair, Vera Eckert, Reuters (9/6/2010)
    3. UAE Nuclear Reactor Work to Start in December, Yemen News Agency (9/6/2010)
E.  Links of Interest
    1. 'Floating Chernobyls' to Hit the High Seas, Garry White, The Telegraph (9/6/2010)
    2. U.N. Atom Chief Invited Israel to Mull Joining NPT, Reuters (9/3/2010)
    3. Over 30 Countries Aspire for Nuclear Power, Jutta Wolf, World News (9/2/2010)



A.  Iran

1.
Blair: War on Iran Has To Be an Option
PressTV
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Despite being under fire for joining the US to invade Iraq, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair has advocated keeping an attack on Iran on the table.

Blair, speaking on ABC News's 'This Week' on Sunday said if he were still in power, he 'wouldn't take the risk' of allowing Iran to gain nuclear weapons, adding an attack has to be an option.

"It is a problem," Blair said. "I don't know. You don't know. You're making a calculation of risk. When you're in the hot seat of decision making you have to decide. Maybe if they got them, they would never use them. But I don't think, if I was a leader today, and certainly, this is the view I took then, I don't think I would take the risk."

The British official urged the international community to go for tougher action against Iran and "prevent the Iranians from getting a nuclear bomb.”

He then argued that he would not want to see a military confrontation with Iran, but stressed that preemptive military action against Tehran could be inevitable.

"I don't want to see it, but I'm saying you cannot exclude it because the primary objective has got to be to prevent them from getting a nuclear weapon," said Blair.

This is all while Washington and Tel Aviv have also been talking about the possibility of a military attack against Iran's nuclear installations, accusing Iran of seeking atomic bombs under the guise of its nuclear program.

The latest US threat against Iran was posed almost last month by Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen.

Mullen said the US military was prepared to attack Iran, if that would deter the state from acquiring 'nuclear weapons.'

The allegations and the unilateral sanctions against Iran come while Israel and the US possess a nuclear arsenal and America has used atomic weapons in the past.

Iranian military officials, however, downplay the foreign threats, warning of 'crushing response to aggressors.'

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/141443.html


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2.
Iran Calls on IAEA Not to Surrender to U.S. Pressures: MP
Xinhua News Agency
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Head of the National Security and Foreign Policy Commission of Iran's Parliament Alaeddin Boroujerdi Monday called on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) not to be influenced by Washington's political pressures over Iran's nuclear activities, the English language satellite Press TV reported.

"The Islamic Republic of Iran expects (the Director General of IAEA) Yukiya Amano to act independently in handing over a report on Iran's nuclear issue," Broujerdi was quoted as saying.

Amano is to hand over to the IAEA's 35-member Board of Governors his seasonal report on a whole range of issues, including Iran's nuclear activities, on Monday, according to the report.

"As an IAEA member, Iran has accepted all the regulations of this international body and, hence, has acted in accordance with those regulations," Boroujerdi said.

"Given this all-out cooperation, Iran expects Amano, as the most senior authority at the agency, to act in line with the agency's rules and regulations, and not to be influenced by U.S. political pressure," the report quoted him as saying.

Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast reiterated on Sunday that Iran will not bow to pressures meant to discourage the country from pursuing its nuclear rights.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-09/06/c_13481295.htm


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3.
Israel, U.S. Not Dare Attack Iran - Ahmadinejad
RIA Novosti
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad expressed confidence that the United States and Israel would not dare unleash a war against the Islamic republic.

The current U.S. pressure on Iran is just a psychological war, Ahmadinejad said at a joint press conference with Qatar's Emir Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani on Sunday in Doha, the Saudi media said.

"There will be no war against Iran," Xinhua news agency quoted Ahmadinejad as saying. "All the talk in this regard is only psychological war, and we believe that there are rational men in the United States that who do not support taking such a step."

Information on possible attacks on Iran, which have allegedly leaked from intelligence services, regularly pops up in the mass media. Experts consider such articles a method of "psychological pressure" on Teheran aimed at forcing the state to compromise with the West.

"Iran is fully ready and is able to hit back crucially against any aggression," Ahmadinejad added.

The U.S. and other Western nations accuse Iran of attempting to build weapons under the guise of peaceful nuclear energy generation and demand Teheran halt its controversial uranium enrichment program.

Tehran has repeatedly rejected the demand, insisting it is pursuing a purely civilian program.

Several Western powers have called for harsher sanctions against Tehran if it does not agree to halt its nuclear program. The United States and Israel have not ruled out military action against Iran in case it continues its program.

Any Israeli attack upon Iran would result in the demise of Israel, Ahmadinejad said. "Any attack against Iran will lead to the eradication of the Zionist entity," he said, referring to the destruction of Israel.

Qatar and Iran also discussed the situation in Iraq and Palestinian territories, which resumed direct talks with Israel on September 2.

Earlier, Ahmadinejad described Iran as a "fist" that will "knock teeth out" of anyone who has the courage to attack the Islamic republic.

Available at:
http://en.rian.ru/world/20100906/160484476.html


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4.
Iran is Being Sanctioned for Crimes It Didn't Commit
Haaretz
9/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran is being unlawfully sanctioned for crimes it did not commit, the Iranian semi-official Fars news agency quoted a senior Tehran official on Sunday.

The United Nations approved a fourth round of sanctions against Iran in early June over accusations that Tehran is seeking to develop atomic weapons. Iran denies its nuclear program is militaristic in nature and says it has a right to conduct uranium enrichment for peaceful purposes.

Washington and other powers accuse Iran of seeking to build a nuclear weapon.

On Sunday, Fars quoted Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Ramin Mehman-Parast as saying that the UN-led "sanctions and resolutions are illegal, illogical and unfair in principle," adding that "the sanctions and resolutions are based on an illegal approach as our nation is being tried for a crime that it has not committed."

The Iranian official added that Iran Tehran would continue to pursue the "nation's basic rights and will not renounce them in the face of pressures."

On Saturday, U.S. chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Michael Mullen stressed the need for Turkey to help enforce UN sanctions against Iran aimed at deterring the Islamic Republic from obtaining a nuclear bomb.

Mullen told reporters in the Turkish capital he did not plan to question or rebut Turkey over the vote and welcomed Turkey's stated intention to abide by those sanctions.

Turkey voted against the U.S.-backed sanctions against Iran in June, insisting that its neighbor's nuclear program is peaceful, despite fears that Tehran might be seeking to develop nuclear arms. Turkey has, however, stated that it will abide by the sanctions.

Mullen said that both countries agree that Iran should not achieve a nuclear weapons capability, and need to "do all that we can to ensure that."

Mullen praised Turkey - NATO's sole Muslim member state - for its role in Afghanistan and said the United States would welcome any additional help it can provide.

Turkey currently holds the rotating command of the international peacekeeping force guarding the Afghan capital, while Turkish instructors are training the Afghan army and police force.

"We would like Turkey to sustain all of those efforts, Mullen said. Any additional capabilities that Turkey can provide against the training shortfall, that would certainly be of great help," Mullen said.

Available at:
http://www.haaretz.com/news/international/iran-is-being-sanctioned-for-crimes-it-didn-t-commit-official-says-1.312338


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5.
Iran Says Japan Deprived from Using Iran's Potentials by Sanctions
Xinhua News Agency
9/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said Sunday that any country, including Japan, which imposes sanctions against Iran, will deprive itself from taking advantages of Iran's potentials, the official IRNA news agency reported.

"Any country joining the sanction-imposing states club against Iran will deprive itself from taking advantages of the country's high potentials," Mehmanparast told IRNA, reacting to Japan's latest move to impose new sanctions on Iran.

Japan's cabinet Friday approved new sanctions against Iran, including an assets freeze on figures linked to its nuclear program and tighter restrictions on financial transactions.

Japan also said it would suspend new oil and gas investments in Iran, but there are no plans to restrict imports of crude oil from the Islamic republic, a major energy supplier to resource-poor Japan.

The Iranian spokesman said such moves would affect the national interests of the countries that have imposed new sanctions against Iran, IRNA quoted him as saying.

The anti-Iran sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council were all "illegal and unfair," he said, adding that "The sanctions were imposed only because Iranians want their legitimate right of having peaceful nuclear technology."

Japan's steps come a month after Tokyo approved punitive measures in line with a June UN Security Council resolution which slapped a fourth set of sanctions on Iran over its refusal to halt uranium enrichment work.

Mounting additional unilateral political pressures on Iran would have no effect on the country and would only arouse its resistance, IRNA quoted Mehmanparast as saying.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-09/05/c_13479618.htm


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B.  DPRK

1.
Members Building Up Momentum for North Korea Nuke Talks
The Korea Herald
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Partners of the six-nation dialogue aimed at denuclearizing North Korea have been engaged in a flurry of diplomatic activities for weeks, adding to speculation that the stalled negotiations may restart despite lingering differences.

Mediating between Pyongyang and its Cold War enemies, China has recently suggested a compromise among the six countries involved in the nuclear disarmament talks so that negotiations can get back on track.

The reclusive North, which was slapped with additional sanctions last week as a punishment for sinking a South Korean warship in March, has expressed a renewed willingness to return to the talks. The change of stance appears to have been motivated by the prospect of financial assistance via the aid-for-denuclearization talks. The negotiations involving the two Koreas, the U.S., China, Japan and Russia, have been suspended since the end of 2008 following Pyongyang’s second atomic test.

Seoul and Washington remain wary of an early resumption of the talks, saying North Korea should first admit to torpedoing the naval vessel Cheonan. Pyongyang has repeatedly denied its role in the disaster, which killed 46 sailors.

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is currently in Beijing for a six-day trip that will likely provide him information on North Korean leader Kim Jong-il’s recent summit with Chinese President Hu Jintao.

Carter, who failed to meet with the North Korean dictator during his trip to the communist state last month, briefly met with Seoul’s Vice Foreign Minister Chun Yung-woo on Sunday on his way to China. They discussed, among other issues, the prospect of restarting the denuclearization talks, Seoul’s Foreign Ministry said.

Carter’s trip comes shortly after South Korea’s chief nuclear envoy met with senior U.S. officials in Washington. After discussing issues on the divided Korean Peninsula with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Jim Steinberg and others, South Korea’s Wi Sung-lac said five dialogue partners, excluding Pyongyang, “will start close consultations to form a constructive environment for resuming (the stalled talks).”

Wi, however, called an immediate resumption of the talks premature, adding Seoul and Washington “remain firm” on the belief that North Korea must first apologize over the Cheonan incident and show an earnest willingness to disable its nuclear facilities.
In a related move, Washington’s special envoy to the six-party talks, Sung Kim, is expected to visit South Korea this week to discuss the six-party talks and the recent U.S. sanctions on Pyongyang.

Kim will share with Seoul officials what was discussed during Chinese top nuclear envoy Wu Dawei’s trip to Washington last week, a Foreign Ministry official here said.

Keen to increase its influence on the divided peninsula and renew the strained ties with Washington, China appears most eager to see the denuclearization talks resume.

And despite their firm statements, other dialogue partners are likely to expand discussions on coordinating their previous positions, especially as sanctions have thus far been ineffective in denuclearizing North Korea, analysts say.

China’s winning of Pyongyang’s consent to a “three stage plan” -- consisting of preparatory talks between the U.S. and North Korea, an informal meeting between the six parties and then a formal session -- is another factor that might soften the stances of Seoul and Washington, they say.

Meanwhile, a Seoul official hinted at a possible resumption of rice aid to North Korea, which has been facing worsening food shortages in recent months due to the floods that devastated farmlands.

“We are coming to an agreement that providing rice on a nongovernmental basis is the best option,” the official said, asking not to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue.

The South Korean Unification Ministry has been skeptical of sending rice to Pyongyang on a government basis, citing the negative public sentiment here following the March 26 sinking of the Cheonan.

Resuming rice shipments to Pyongyang, which relies mostly on outside assistance to feed its population of some 25 million, will not only help relieve food shortages, but may also ease the inter-Korean tensions and create a better environment to reopen the denuclearization talks, experts say.

Available at:
http://www.koreaherald.com/national/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20100906000766


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2.
U.S. Unenthusiastic About Resumption of 6-Party Talks
The Chosun Ilbo
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Differences of opinion between the United States and China over the resumption of six-party talks about the denuclearization of North Korea are widening. China's chief nuclear negotiator Wu Dawei went to the U.S. to urge prompt resumption of the talks, but some skeptics there argue that the six-party talks are useless and have only aggravated the situation while giving the North Korea breathing space to develop its weapons.

This was reflected in a recent remark by former U.S. Secretary of Defense William Cohen, who said the U.S. is interested in a "new way" that could generate more positive results than the six-way talks.

Remarks by State Department spokesman Philip Crowley on Wu's visit to the U.S. last week also reflect these views. "We're certain that China has its own ideas on how to proceed from where we are to a better place," Crowley said. "We have our own ideas. Other countries also will have their thoughts on how to move forward. We will be consulting, as we are this week. We'll have further consultations in the upcoming weeks as we evaluate what we think the next steps should be."

The six-party talks started in 2003 as a multilateral approach to the denuclearization of North Korea after the bilateral Geneva Agreement between North Korea and the U.S. in 1994 failed. Their greatest moment came in 2005 with a statement of principles, when the U.S. and Japan promised to normalize relations with North Korea and the North agreed to dismantle its program. But talks came to a halt in December 2008, when North Korea began re-operating its nuclear program during the verification process.

That does not mean that the Obama administration completely wants to scrap the format. A sizeable group in America believes that six-party framework is necessary in the long term in Northeast Asia, where there is no security consultative body as in Europe or Southeast Asia. But even if the six-party talks remain, the U.S. is determined not to repeat the mistakes of the past, which saw the North conduct two nuclear tests while the talks were ostensibly underway and gain concessions as a result.

The Obama administration is expected to stress China's responsibility to work for North Korea's irreversible denuclearization and focus on solving this problem in the shortest time possible.

Available at:
http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/09/06/2010090600975.html


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3.
U.S. Nuclear Envoy to Visit This Week
The Korea Herald
9/5/2010
(for personal use only)


A senior U.S. nuclear official will visit South Korea this week to discuss resumption of the multilateral forum aimed at ending North Korea‘s nuclear programs, officials here said.

Sung Kim, Washington’s special envoy to the six-party talks, will visit Seoul on a three-day visit from Wednesday to attend a security forum hosted by the Unification Ministry. Officials at Seoul‘s Foreign Ministry said Kim will also meet his counterparts here for discussions on the six-party talks and recent U.S. sanctions on Pyongyang.

The six-party talks, which opened in 2003, involve the two Koreas, the U.S., Russia, Japan and host China. The discussions have been on hold since December 2008 on a North Korean boycott.

The North’s torpedoing of the South Korean warship Cheonan in March also dampened the mood for resuming the talks.

Kim‘s trip comes amid a flurry of diplomatic activities by dialogue partners to push for the restart of the nuclear talks. Wi Sung-lac, South Korea’s top nuclear representative, was in Washington over the weekend, meeting his U.S. counterparts. Wu Dawei, the chief Chinese nuclear envoy, recently visited Pyongyang, Seoul, Tokyo and then Washington.

“Kim will sit down with our officials to review what was discussed between the U.S. and China and then review bilateral issues between the U.S. and South Korea,” a Foreign Ministry official here said. “He will also exchange opinions with us on the recent U.S. sanctions on North Korea.”

Regional powers remain divided over the next course of action for the stalled nuclear talks. South Korea maintains North Korea must first apologize for sinking the Cheonan and take concrete steps toward denuclearization.

Wi told reporters in Washington on Saturday that he believed it was “premature” to resume the six-party talks at this juncture.

“I am not saying we are not going to participate in the six-party talks, but I am saying it‘s premature to go to the six-party talks at this point,” he said after meeting with Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg and other U.S. officials to discuss the reopening of the negotiations stalled over U.N. sanctions for the North’s missile and nuclear tests. “We need to work for the environment for the six-party talks.”

Wi’s remarks are in line with State Department spokesman Philip Crowley, who on Wednesday dismissed Wu Dawei‘s proposal for another bilateral contact between the U.S. and North Korea.

“We’re certain that China has its own ideas on how to proceed from where we are to a better place,” Crowley said at the time. “We have our own ideas. We‘ll have further consultations in the upcoming weeks, as we evaluate what we think the next steps should be.”

Crowley has said the U.S. will not have talks for talks’ sake in response to North Korean leader Kim Jong-il‘s pledge last week to denuclearize. Kim also called for early resumption of the six-party talks.

North Korea has expressed willingness to return to the talks through a “three-step” approach, with a bilateral meeting with the U.S. followed by informal talks with other dialogue partners and then the full-fledged six-nation meeting.

China, the strongest ally of North Korea, has called for relevant parties to “make efforts for early resumption of the six-party talks,” but South Korea and the U.S. have countered they will not hold talks only for the sake of talks.

During his visit to Washington last week, Chinese chief nuclear envoy Wu urged “relevant parties to make efforts for early resumption of the six-party talks,” although “we now have many difficulties toward the resumption of the six-party talks.”

Stephen Bosworth, U.S. special representative for North Korea policy, visited Pyongyang in December in the first high-level contact under the Obama administration, and the sides were negotiating another high-level dialogue in March before the Cheonan incident took place.

Available at:
http://www.koreaherald.com/national/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20100905000291


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C.  Nuclear Cooperation

1.
Jordan, Japan to Sign Nuclear Cooperation Agreement This Week
Nayla Razzouk
Business Week
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Jordan will sign a nuclear cooperation agreement with Japan this week, paving the way for Areva SA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. to sell reactors to the Middle East country.

“Jordan and Japan will sign a nuclear cooperation agreement in Amman on Friday,” the Jordan Atomic Energy Commission said in an e-mailed statement today.

Jordan is due to sign two more similar agreements with Romania and the Czech Republic this year and hopes to reach one with the U.S. soon after, the commission’s Chairman Khalid Touqan said in an interview Aug. 2.

The kingdom, which is mostly covered by desert and relies almost entirely on imports for its energy needs, is turning to nuclear power to meet increasing electricity demand. The country plans to build reactors by 2019 and has signed agreements with eight countries including Russia, China, France and the U.K.

Jordan will select the supplier of its first nuclear reactor by April from among three designs, Touqan said.

The commission and Worley Parsons, Australia’s biggest engineering company, will hold talks until then with the pre- selected groups of Canadian, French, Japanese and Russian bidders, he said.

The commission preselected three reactor technologies on May 12: Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.’s Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6), Russia’s Atomstroyexport ZAO’s AES-92 VVER-1000 and “ATMEA1,” proposed by Paris-based Atmea, a 50-50 joint venture between France’s Areva SA and Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd.

Areva, the world’s largest maker of reactors, signed agreements with Jordan this year for the protection of the planned nuclear installations and the exploration and mining of uranium in the kingdom.

Jordan estimates it has 65,000 tons of uranium deposits and expects annual production of 2,000 tons.

Available at:
http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-09-06/jordan-japan-to-sign-nuclear-cooperation-agreement-this-week.html


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2.
Nuclear Safety Experts Convene in Amman
Taylor Luck
The Jordan Times
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Nuclear experts and officials from across the world are meeting in the capital this week to provide safety support for the Kingdom’s nuclear power programme.

The Regulatory Cooperation Forum (RCF), sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started its work in the capital on Saturday as part of a global initiative to enhance safety for emerging and expanding nuclear states, according to the Jordan Nuclear Regulatory Commission (JNRC).

Through the forum, established late last year, the Kingdom along with other emerging nuclear countries will benefit from international experience and expertise in nuclear safety, particularly regulatory support for nuclear power plants.

This week’s meetings marks the first of the RCF, which will spend the next four days focusing on how to apply best practices in nuclear safety and regulation to the Kingdom’s nuclear power programme.

The meetings, which are being attended by representatives of the US, the UK, Japan, South Korea, the UAE and officials from the IAEA, will conclude on Wednesday.

In a statement received by The Jordan Times, JNRC Director General Jamal Sharaf stressed that the selection of Jordan as the first country to benefit from the RCF’s assistance is the result of political will and ongoing cooperation between the Kingdom and the IAEA as well as the international community.

He underlined the transparency of the country’s nuclear power programme, and the regulatory framework put in place by the JNRC.

The RCF, which will be officially launched during the IAEA general conference in Vienna later this year, is open to all member states, according to the IAEA.

The Kingdom’s nuclear power programme calls for the establishment of a 1,000 megawatt reactor near Aqaba within a decade, with additional reactors planned to wean the country off of costly energy imports.

Jordan is signatory to several international conventions, including the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Convention on Nuclear Safety, the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

Available at:
http://www.jordantimes.com/?news=29835


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3.
Italy, Korea Embark on 1st Nuclear Energy Workshop
The Korea Herald
9/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Nuclear energy is becoming an increasingly looked-at alternative to fossil fuels, which are depleteing and cause green house emissons.

To examine this further, the first Korea-Italy workshop on nuclear technology will be held on Thursday at Seoul National University.

Organized by the Italian Embassy’s Science and Technology Office and SNU, the lectures will be conducted by representatives of the universities and research organizations of both countries and will focus on the day-to-day strategic and vital field of nuclear technologies.

The workshop will look at the subject of new and advanced trends in nuclear engineering, focusing attention on future generations of nuclear power plants, as well as research and development activities carried out in both countries.

“Nowadays, nuclear energy is going through restored international interest, being an energy source that does not increase greenhouses gases and positively contributes to solving the growing problem of climate change and global warming,” said Italian Ambassador Massimo Leggeri.

“In addition, nuclear power plants represent the best available answer to global needs for energy security and sustainability with reasonable and competitive unit costs,” he added.

South Korea and Italy are well geared toward nuclear energy.

Both lack fossil fuels but have increasing needs for energy to operate their industrial production and their social welfare systems.

“In this framework, Italian and Korean experts are expected to join experiences related to the different developments and results,” said Leggeri.

Available at:
http://www.koreaherald.com/national/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20100905000153


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4.
Vietnam and Russia to Co-operate on Nuclear Power
Nhan Dan
9/4/2010
(for personal use only)


Co-operation on nuclear energy with Russia has a significant meaning in expressing the trust and strategic partnership between Vietnam and Russia.

This was stated by Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung upon receiving the General Director of Rosatom State Nuclear Energy Corporation, Sergei V. Kirienko, on September 3 in Hanoi.

Prime Minister Dung spoke highly of the negotiations between agencies in both countries, particularly the draft co-operation agreement for building the first nuclear power plant in Vietnam, which is scheduled to be signed when Russian President Dmitry Medvedev visits Vietnam in October.

Prime Minister Dung thanked the friendly country for training Vietnamese technical staff in building the nuclear power plant, research centres, and technical supervision centres as well as the application of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes in Vietnam.

General Director Sergei V. Kirienko expressed Rosamtom’s honour in being selected as Vietnam's partner to build the first nuclear power plant in Vietnam.

He also provided positive results on negotiations related to the project, particulealy regarding technology, materials, waste treatment and nuclear security.

Available at:
http://www.nhandan.com.vn/english/news/040910/domestic_vr.htm


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D.  Nuclear Energy

1.
European Union's Oettinger says German Nuclear Deal Fair
Vera Eckert
Reuters
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


European Union energy commissioner Gunether Oettinger on Monday welcomed Germany's nuclear energy move made by the government on Sunday, saying plans to grant nuclear plants longer life cycles tied in with wider energy plans for the bloc.

Talking to reporters at an energy conference in Munich, he said: "The EU wants to lay down a focus for the next 10 years of energy policy in the winter and Germany's decision fits in exactly at the right time."

The compromise between Chancellor Angela Merkel, utilities and many other stakeholders was "fair," he said.

"I am also pleased that additional funds for renewables will be brought in as part of the provisions," he said.

Burdens from the deal for utilities in the shape of a fuel tax and funds that they have to provide to the promotion of renewable energies, would probably be shouldered.

"I am certain everyone's done their sums and it was correctly measured," he said.

Oettinger also said that he was convinced the plan would stand up to possible challenges in constitutional courts.

The EU Commission was planning soon to get directives on the way that would aim to solve nuclear waste repository issues, he added.

Merkel's plan, which is aimed at laying the groundwork for German energy policy to be revealed later this month, envisages to allow four nuclear operators RWE, E.ON, EnBW and Vattenfall Europe to operate their reactors on average 12 years longer than planned.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSLDE6850PB20100906


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2.
Invensys in Talks on Chinese Nuclear Power Deals
Reuters
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


British engineering group Invensys said on Monday it was in talks to provide controls and systems for up to four new nuclear power stations in China. Chief Executive Ulf Henriksson said at Nomura's Rail Infrastructure Seminar that Invensys was increasingly targeting emerging markets, particularly in its power, oil and gas and railway operations.

"We have had considerable success during the past two years in China's rapidly expanding nuclear power generation market, and we expect this success to continue, as we are currently in negotiations to supply such solutions to four additional greenfield nuclear powers stations," he said in comments emailed to Reuters.

The group, which also provides rail signalling equipment, is looking at partnerships with other rail infrastructure providers, including rolling stock manufacturers, to grow its business in emerging economies, James Drummond from its rail division told the seminar.

Shares in Invensys were 0.65 percent higher at 248.3 pence by 1118 GMT, outperforming the index of Britain's leading companies .FTSE, which was up 0.3 percent.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSLDE68512O20100906


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3.
UAE Nuclear Reactor Work to Start in December
Yemen News Agency
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Work on the UAE s $20-billion four nuclear reactors will start in December this year, according to the Korean consortium which won the deal last year, according to Qatar News Agency.

Korea s state-controlled Korea Electric Power Corp. (Kepco) won the deal to build nuclear reactors in December 2009.

The first of the 1,400 megawatt reactors in Braka, some 270 kilometers west of Abu Dhabi, will come online in 2017, with the others following by 2020, The Korea Time reported on Sunday, quoting unnamed Kepco official.

"Both sides have agreed on holding a groundbreaking ceremony within this year," said rhe official. "We will be able to complete construction of the first reactor by 2017 if there are no major problems," it said.

Kepco will take on the full scope of works and services, including engineering, procurement, construction, nuclear fuel, and operations and maintenance support, according to the UAE-based (Emirates Business).

It will be assisted by its own subsidiaries and the other consortium members: Hyundai Engineering & Construction., Samsung C&T Corp., Doosan Heavy and Engineering, Korea Nuclear Fuel, the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power, the US firm Westinghouse Electric Co., and Japan's Toshiba Corp., Korea Time said.

Available at:
http://www.sabanews.net/en/news223630.htm


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E.  Links of Interest

1.
'Floating Chernobyls' to Hit the High Seas
Garry White
The Telegraph
9/6/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/markets/7982927/Floating-Chernobyls-to-hi..


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2.
U.N. Atom Chief Invited Israel to Mull Joining NPT
Reuters
9/3/2010
(for personal use only)
http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE68211Q20100903


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3.
Over 30 Countries Aspire for Nuclear Power
Jutta Wolf
World News
9/2/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.international.to/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=682..


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