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Nuclear News - 9/30/2010
PGS Nuclear News, September 30, 2010
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Iran Urges More Talks on Fuel Swap, PressTV (9/29/2010)
    2. Iran Nuclear Plant Hit by Two-Month Delay: Official, AFP (9/29/2010)
    3. P5+1 Ignores Iran's Talks' Offer, PressTV (9/29/2010)
    4. China Firmly Opposed to Iran Sanctions, PressTV (9/29/2010)
    5. Iran to Press for Recognition of 'Nuclear Rights', AFP (9/28/2010)
B.  DPRK
    1. North Korea Vows to Strengthen "Nuclear Deterrent", Louis Charbonneau , Reuters (9/29/2010)
C.  India
    1. Hillary Raises Nuclear Liability Issue with Krishna, The Hindu (9/29/2010)
    2. India, U.S. to Sign $3.5B Defense Deal, UPI (9/28/2010)
D.  Nuclear Cooperation
    1. UAE Enthusiastic Partner of IAEA Initiatives, Khaleej Times (9/29/2010)
    2. Jordan Sees Nuclear Accord with U.S. by Year-End, Amena Bakr, Reuters (9/28/2010)
    3. US Spy Chief to Brief Senators on Russia Nuclear Treaty, AFP (9/28/2010)
E.  Nuclear Energy
    1. Japan Firms to Provide Nuclear Estimates to Kazakhstan, Reuters (9/29/2010)
    2. Sri Lanka to Establish its First Nuclear Power Plant, Anuradha K. Herath, Allvoices (9/28/2010)
    3. German Government Approves New Energy Plan, BBC News (9/28/2010)
    4. Malaysia Prepares for Nuclear Power Plant Construction, Xinhua News Agency (9/28/2010)
F.  Links of Interest
    1. US Asks Japan to Withdraw from Iran Oil Project, Reuters (9/29/2010)
    2. Denuclearization a Distant Dream, Kim So Yeol, Daily NK (9/28/2010)
    3. Iranian Lawmaker Urges UN Restructuring, PressTV (9/28/2010)



A.  Iran

1.
China Firmly Opposed to Iran Sanctions
PressTV
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


A senior Chinese official has expressed his country's strong opposition to anti-Iran sanctions, reiterating Beijing's support for diplomacy on Tehran's nuclear issue.

"China supports the legitimate right of Iran, as a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, to use nuclear energy for peaceful applications," Li Changchun, a senior official of the Communist Party of China (CPC) said in the Iranian capital of Tehran on Tuesday.

He further added that China has always called for resolving the dispute over Iran's nuclear case through negotiations, Fars news agency reported.

"China is strongly against unilateral sanctions and pressure [exerted] by Western countries and the United States on Iran over its nuclear case," he went on to say.

The Chinese official criticized America's dual policies on international issues, noting that the US and certain other countries use military power to impose their hegemonic approaches.

Li emphasized the importance of adopting appropriate strategies to counter such measures.

China, a long-time energy partner of Iran, voted in June in favor of the US-engineered UN sanctions resolution against Tehran over its nuclear program.

However, Beijing strongly condemned further measures by the US and the European Union to impose additional unilateral sanctions against the Islamic Republic, arguing that such moves would hamper negotiations to resolve the West's nuclear standoff with Iran.

Li also reiterated Iran's importance and influence in the region and added that the progress and strength of the Islamic Republic and other developing countries would help change the current unjust world order.

He praised Iran's leading role in developing relations with China and emphasized on Beijing's commitment to the policy of cooperating with Tehran.

The Chinese official also said the two countries should deepen trade and economic relations and implement agreements and contracts already signed between the two countries.

According to Li, positive and stable development of mutual ties has benefited both nations.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/144455.html


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2.
Iran Nuclear Plant Hit by Two-Month Delay: Official
AFP
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran's atomic chief said on Wednesday that the country's first nuclear power plant will be ready to generate electricity by January -- two months later than announced.

Ali Akbar Salehi said that the process of placing fuel rods at the Bushehr facility, built by Russia, would be completed by the "middle of" the Iranian month of Aban, around November 7, the state television's website reported.

"Two or three months from then, the electricity generated by the plant will be connected to the grid," said Salehi, chief of Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation.

Iran began loading the Russian-supplied fuel rods on August 21 and Ali Shirzadian, spokesman for the atomic body, had then said the plant would be connected to the national grid by end of October or early November.

But Salehi later had said that the loading would begin at the end of the Iranian month of Shahrivar (September 22) and by the end of the month of Mehr (October 22), the lid of the reactor would be shut.

Salehi, in an interview with Al-Alam television on August 31, blamed the delays on Bushehr's "severe hot weather" and safety concerns, adding that the loading was being done during the night.

Iran has not hinted at any other reasons for the delay, but officials have acknowledged that a computer worm is mutating and wreaking havoc on computerised industrial equipment in the country, where an official said on Monday that about 30,000 IP addresses had already been infected.

Analysts say that the Stuxnet worm may have been designed to target Iran's nuclear facilities.

Iranian officials have denied the Islamic republic's first nuclear plant at Bushehr was among the addresses penetrated by the worm, but they have said that personal computers of personnel at the facility have been infected.

Iran says it needs the Bushehr plant, which had been under construction since the 1970s and was finally finished by Russia, to meet growing demand for electricity.

But the international community widely believes that Iran's atomic activities are masking a covert nuclear weapons programme, which Tehran denies.

Iran is under four sets of United Nations sanctions for its refusal to halt uranium enrichment -- the process which can be used to make nuclear fuel but also the fissile core of an atom bomb in highly purified forms.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iPiSrHrGIqO-NBVi3bHxQ3vd7Zpw?docId=CNG.1febe8228fa30f6f19b4372cff6d07a5.521


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3.
Iran Urges More Talks on Fuel Swap
PressTV
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran's Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki has stressed the significance of continued consultations on ways to implement the Tehran Declaration for a potential nuclear fuel swap.

Foreign ministers of Iran, Turkey, and Brazil established and signed the declaration in the Iranian capital of Tehran on May 17, according to which, the Islamic Republic would ship 1,200 kilograms of its low-enriched uranium to Turkey for guaranteed swap with 120 kilograms of 20-percent enriched nuclear fuel rods.

The 20-percent enriched fuel is what Iran needs to power its Tehran research reactor, which produces radioisotopes for treatment of cancer patients.

In a meeting with Brazilian Foreign Minister Celso Amorim in New York on Tuesday, Mottaki said agreements signed between Iran and Brazil during the past two years would prepare the ground for institutionalizing mutual relations in all fields.

He added that exchange of visits between Iranian and Brazilian officials would "guarantee a bright future" and deep-rooted interactions between the two nations.

Amorim further pointed out that Tehran and Brasilia have positive relations and called for the expansion of mutual ties in variety of fields.

In a separate meeting with Foreign Minister of Eritrea Osman Mohammed Saleh, Mottaki reiterated that promoting ties with African nations is among the top priorities of Iran's foreign policy.

He said the Islamic Republic and Eritrea should strengthen their cooperation, particularly in trade and economic fields.

Mottaki also held talks with Tunisian Foreign Minister Kamel Morjane and urged the formation of a joint economic commission and exchanging ministerial visits between the capitals of Iran and Tunisia to further expand ties.

Moreover, the Iranian minister briefed his Tunisian counterpart on latest developments in Afghanistan and on Iran's broad cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Morjane also insisted on expanding relations with the Islamic Republic in different fields.

In another meeting with Grenadian Foreign Minister Peter David, the top Iranian diplomat said Iran has great potential in the fields of trade, implementation of industrial and agricultural projects and investment in small and medium projects.

Mottaki called on Grenada to provide Iranian firms with resources to survey the grounds for expanding cooperation signing agreements in investment and trade areas.

David agreed that the two countries should expand economic cooperation in the future.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/144503.html


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4.
P5+1 Ignores Iran's Talks' Offer
PressTV
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


Tehran's recent offer to hold ministerial talks with the members of P5+1 group in New York has been ignored despite their slogans, Iran's foreign minister says.

“The P5+1 group needs a political will in order to get out of the impasse it has created itself,” Iran's Foreign Minster Manouchehr Mottaki told IRNA on Tuesday.

According to Mottaki, the foreign ministers of the P5+1 group were desperate when Iran announced in New York that it is ready to start negotiations with them, and they disagreed over the issue during their meeting.

“They missed a golden opportunity again,” the Iranian top diplomat added.

Mottaki stressed that dealing with Iran's nuclear issue needs a political will in order to achieve a comprehensive solution based on interaction and cooperation.

“They themselves asked us to accept fuel exchange, but after the Tehran Declaration, which was a positive and constructive approach, they did not take a constructive step and issued a resolution against us,” he further explained.

”That is how they (the US and its allies) can get out of the impasse they have created for themselves,” he noted.

As the major world powers call for an "early negotiated solution" to the standoff over Iran's nuclear program, Tehran reiterates that only fair talks will succeed.

Last week, in a meeting with his Chinese counterpart Yang Jiechi in New York, Mottaki voiced Iran's readiness to hold talks with the Vienna Group, consisting of the US, France, Russia and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as well as the P5+1 group, which include Russia, China, Britain, France, the US and Germany.

He pointed to Iran's diplomatic efforts towards reaching an acceptable nuclear fuel swap deal for the Tehran research reactor and said, "Iran issued the Tehran Declaration with Turkey and Brazil and cooperated with the IAEA to demonstrate its flexibility in a fuel swap agreement."

Iran, Brazil and Turkey issued a joint fuel swap declaration on May 17, in which Tehran agreed to exchange 1,200 kg of its low-enriched uranium on Turkish soil with fuel for its Tehran research reactor.

The Islamic Republic announced its readiness to resume talks on its nuclear program in September, but reiterated that any negotiation must be conducted within the framework of the May 17 declaration.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/144495.html


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5.
Iran to Press for Recognition of 'Nuclear Rights'
AFP
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran will press to have its "nuclear rights" recognised in talks with world powers who accuse Tehran of seeking atomic weapons, a foreign ministry spokesman told reporters on Tuesday.

"Iran has announced its view points and readiness for talks with the P5+1. We are seeking to have Iran's nuclear rights recognised in these talks," Ramin Mehmanparast said at his weekly press briefing.

He said Iran's chief nuclear negotiator Saeed Jalili was seeking to set "a date and venue" to meet EU foreign affairs chief Catherine Ashton, who represents permanent UN Security Council members and Germany -- known as the P5+1.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad last week said an Iranian official may meet with Ashton in October "for preparatory work" in a new bid to open negotiations on Iran's contested nuclear drive.

"If Ms Ashton contacts the Iranian representative she can set a time for talks," the Iranian leader told a press conference in New York.

He also said that "in October the representative of Iran will meet with one member of the P5+1 to decide the framework of talks."

The six world powers - the United States, Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia - are leading the talks aimed at persuading Tehran to rein in its suspect nuclear programme.

But Ahmadinejad told the New York press conference that any talks with the Western powers, who accuse Iran of seeking a nuclear bomb, must be carried out on the principle of "justice and respect."

The Iranian leader had also said that some members of the world powers had had contacts with Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly held last week.

He gave no details apart from saying there had been no contacts with the US government in New York.

In June, the UN Security Council imposed a fourth round of sanctions against the Islamic republic, which in turn said it would suspend talks until September.

In a statement last Wednesday the United States and the other five powers said they are seeking an "early negotiated solution" to the standoff.

Iran's uranium enrichment work is at the centre of international concerns as the process can be used to make nuclear fuel as well as the core of an atom bomb.

Iran denies seeking nuclear weapons and has pressed on with enrichment, insisting it has a right to the process as a signatory of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Available at:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100928/wl_mideast_afp/irannuclearpoliticstalks_20100928102429


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B.  DPRK

1.
North Korea Vows to Strengthen "Nuclear Deterrent"
Louis Charbonneau
Reuters
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


North Korea vowed on Wednesday to bolster its "nuclear deterrent" in response to the threat posed by the United States, but promised never to use its atomic arsenal to attack or threaten any nation.

"As long as the U.S. nuclear aircraft carriers sail around the seas of our country, our nuclear deterrent can never be abandoned, but should be strengthened further," North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Pak Kil-yon told the U.N. General Assembly. "This is the lesson we have drawn."

"The United States is not a defender, but a disruptor, of peace," Pak said.

But he later struck a more moderate tone, telling the 192-nation assembly that Pyongyang's official policy goal remained the eventual "denuclearization of the Korean peninsula ... and the denuclearization of the world."

"Our nuclear weapons are not a means to attack or threaten others, but a self-defensive deterrent ... to counter aggression and attack from outside," Pak said.

He added that North Korea, as a "responsible nuclear weapon state," is ready to support international non-proliferation efforts and moves for the safe management of nuclear material "on an equal footing with other nuclear weapon states."

The United States and most other nations refuse to recognize North Korea, which withdrew from the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in 2003, as a nuclear weapons state.

The U.N. Security Council hit North Korea with two rounds of sanctions for detonating nuclear devices in 2006 and 2009 and has urged it to return to stalled six-party aid-for-disarmament talks with the United States, China, Russia, Japan and South Korea.

"DESPICABLE TRICKERY"

Pak also condemned what he described as "despicable trickery" by major powers and their attempts to overthrow governments in order to change political systems.

"Denying the rights of other countries to choose their own systems constitutes itself the violation of human rights of their people," he said in the English text of his speech. "The DPRK (North Korea) is one of those victimized countries."

U.S.-North Korean relations have worsened since President Barack Obama took office, and U.S. officials have expressed deep concern about the March 26 sinking of the South Korean corvette Cheonan.

The United States and other nations blame the North for the attack. Pyongyang denies the accusation.

Pak raised the Cheonan incident in his U.N. speech, accusing the Security Council of distorting the facts in a July 9 statement that condemned the attack leading to the sinking of the Cheonan but stopped short of blaming North Korea.

"The truth of the Cheonan incident is still under cover," he said.

China, the North's sole powerful ally, has urged regional powers to put the sinking, in which 46 South Korean sailors died, behind them and return to the six-party talks.

Beijing has also expressed alarm at U.S.-South Korean military exercises held in international waters off the Korean peninsula earlier this month, saying they threatened Chinese security interests and could destabilize the region.

In his speech Pak warned Seoul "not to create tension on the Korean peninsula by waging war exercises with outside forces and pursuing (a) confrontational approach."

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSTRE68S40320100929


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C.  India

1.
Hillary Raises Nuclear Liability Issue with Krishna
The Hindu
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Monday raised India's civil nuclear liability issue with External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna at a meeting to do the groundwork for President Barack Obama's visit to India in November.

“The issue was raised with Minister Krishna today [Monday], and he explained the processes that the bill [the Civil Nuclear Liability Bill] had gone through,” Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao, who was present at the 30-minute meeting, told journalists.

The bill, which was passed recently by Parliament and which is critical to the full implementation of the India-U.S. civil nuclear deal, has been troubling several American industrialists as it makes equipment suppliers liable in the event of a nuclear accident.

“And the fact that we were ready to engage with U.S. companies on the questions they had raised to be able to clear their doubts and clarify the issues they wanted to discuss with us,” Ms. Rao said.

Ms. Clinton and Mr. Krishna met at Waldorf Astoria on the sidelines of the opening session of the United Nations General Assembly, which began last week.

Ms. Rao, who had discussed the nuclear liability issue with Ms. Clinton last week in Washington, said: “The U.S. administration understands the process. Secretary Clinton spoke of their own processes…and their often contentious nature of democracy which is a fact that we all appreciate.”

Assistant Secretary Robert Blake said liability issues were an “important priority” for the U.S. “We've taken note of some of the concerns industry representatives have raised about some of the provisions of the liability bill, and the bill may possibly be inconsistent with international standards.”

Available at:
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article801361.ece


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2.
India, U.S. to Sign $3.5B Defense Deal
UPI
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


India and the United States are set to sign a landmark $3.5 billion defense deal, the biggest ever between the two countries.

Although details of the prospective deal have yet to be officially released, local media in India reported that the agreement would include the purchase of 10 C-17 Globemaster transport aircraft for the Indian air force.

The advanced airplanes are intended to replace India's aging fleet of Russian-made Ilyushin IL-76s.

The Economic Times reported that the deal was due to be signed in November when U.S. President Barack Obama visits India.

The same newspaper said the deal was being concluded through government-to-government negotiations under the U.S. Foreign Military Sales program.

"The C-17 is likely to provide the Indian air force with much stronger transport capabilities," The Economic Times said explaining that the Boeing-made Globemaster, known also as the Hercules C-17, is best utilized for air dropping paratroopers and supplies, emergency evacuations and carrying heavy equipment.

The transport plane was largely deployed by the United States in Iraq as well as Afghanistan.

Bent on bolstering its military might and becoming a regional superpower, India announced plans recently to spend up to $30 billion on its military by 2012.

In recent months, also, it inducted a long-range, nuclear-tipped missile into its armed forces, unveiling, also, a defense spending budget spiked by 24 percent since last year.

The moves have Pakistan fretting, with leading officials billing India's drive a "massive militarization."

Boosting its defense artillery, India last week successfully launched a surface-to-surface supersonic missile, marking the first missile to be tested in supersonic speed in steep-dive mode.

India is also in the process of expanding its defense ties with Poland, discussing possible joint research and development of weapons.

The Economic Times reported that while the multibillion-dollar defense deal would be finalized at the government level, "Boeing will handle its implementation as well as the offsets."

Once the deal is successfully completed, India will have the largest C-17 fleet outside the United States. England currently hosts the largest fleet outside the United States with eight planes. Qatar and Australia follow, respectively.

The massive multiservice C-17 Globemaster can carry large combat equipment and troops. It can also serve as important airlift support for humanitarian aid missions bound across large distances to small airfields that have runways just 3,500 feet long and 90 feet wide. It can carry a payload of around 170,000 pounds and has a range of more than 3,200 miles.

Available at:
http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2010/09/28/India-US-to-sign-35B-defense-deal/UPI-53011285705699/


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D.  Nuclear Cooperation

1.
UAE Enthusiastic Partner of IAEA Initiatives
Khaleej Times
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


The UAE Permanent Representative to the International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA), Ambassador Hamad Ali Al Ka’abi, said that the UAE has been significantly contributing to the development efforts of the peaceful nuclear energy programme.
Hamad told Emirates News Agency (Wam) in a statement that the “selection of the UAE to the board of governors of the IAEA for 2010-2012, reflects the care of UAE’s work for the IAEA”.

He underscored that the UAE has taken unequivocal stances in the areas of nuclear energy, non proliferation and guarantees, adding that the UAE backs expansion in civil nuclear programmes.

Regarding the general conference of the IAEA, Ambassador Hamad, said that some of important resolutions in the fields of nuclear safety, security and guarantees have been endorsed, but the Arab resolution on the Israeli nuclear capabilities has not yet been endorsed. “The UAE has been calling Israel to join the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, being the only country in the region that has not joined it,” Ka’abi said.

Available at:
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/displayarticle.asp?xfile=data/theuae/2010/September/theuae_September637.xml§ion=theuae&col


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2.
Jordan Sees Nuclear Accord with U.S. by Year-End
Amena Bakr
Reuters
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


Jordan expects to reach a compromise and sign a nuclear cooperation accord with the United States by the end of this year, although it will not forfeit its right to enrich uranium, an official said on Tuesday.

Over the past two years, Jordan's reluctance to give up its right to enrich uranium in the future has prevented the kingdom from signing a cooperation pact called a 123 agreement with the United States, said Kamal Khdier, director of planning at Jordan's Atomic Energy Commission.

Under the terms of a proposed U.S. accord, Jordan could mine the ore but not convert it into fuel.

"We received a positive gesture from the U.S. administration, and we are hoping to reach a compromise and sign the agreement by the end of this year," said Khdier, on the sidelines of an industry event in Dubai.

"Our official strategic plan is not to enrich uranium now, but in the future this may change, so we will not give up our right to do so," he said.

"In 10 to 20 years from now, the technology to enrich uranium may become more accessible and cheaper, and that's the main reason why Jordan does not want to give up the right to enrich now," he added.

Jordan has discovered deposits of uranium estimated to be around 65,000 tonnes so far, which it hopes to mine commercially for domestic use and export.

France's Areva signed a joint venture earlier this year to mine uranium in central Jordan under a 25-year concession. In May Jordan shortlisted Areva, Canada's AECL and Russia's Atomstroyexport in a competition to design two power plants with a total capacity of 2,000 megawatts, said Khdier.

"We are planning to announce the winner of the bid by the start of 2011 and the completion date will be by 2019-2020," he added.

Last year, the UAE signed a nuclear cooperation accord that contained commitments barring the Gulf country from using U.S. technology to develop a nuclear weapon and from enriching uranium or reprocessing used nuclear fuel. It is obliged to import all fuel for its nuclear reactors.

U.S. negotiators were insisting on similar guarantees by Jordan that would oblige it to buy reactor fuel from the international market as a safeguard against its potential diversion for military uses.

Jordan has signed nuclear cooperation agreements with eight countries including France, China and Russia to develop a civilian nuclear programme and reduce its reliance on oil imports, which cost 20 percent of its gross domestic product.

"But we do need to sign this agreement with the U.S. to set the political scene, and a lot of material and equipment for the project will come from there," Khdier said.

With a civilian nuclear programme in place, the country hopes to generate 30 percent of its energy needs through nuclear power by 2030.

Available at:
http://ca.reuters.com/article/companyNews/idCALDE68R1CC20100928?rpc=401&feedType=RSS&feedName=companyNews&rpc=401


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3.
US Spy Chief to Brief Senators on Russia Nuclear Treaty
AFP
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


US spy chief James Clapper will brief senators Wednesday on intelligence issues tied to a landmark nuclear treaty with Russia, amid worries about Moscow's compliance, a lawmaker said Tuesday.

Republicans have concerns about the agreement and "we'll raise those in the closed hearing" said Senator Kit Bond, the top Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Clapper, the US director of national intelligence, will head to the capitol in the early evening, one Senate aide said on condition of anonymity. Another confirmed that the briefing would occur without specifying a timeframe.

The US Senate is expected to vote on ratifying the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) after November elections that are expected to deal a blow to President Barack Obama's Democratic allies in the congress.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee endorsed the agreement in a 14-4 vote on September 16 even after one of the panel's Republican members, Senator James Risch, said the US intelligence community had shared "troubling" new information with lawmakers.

Lawmakers were tight-lipped about the details at the time, though Bond warned in a statement about "the treaty's lack of verification necessary to detect Russian cheating."

Asked whether there was anything new given longstanding allegations of Russian non-compliance, Risch told reporters after the committee vote: "You haven't seen the same stuff I've seen," but would not elaborate.

The treaty -- signed by Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and Obama at an elaborate ceremony in Prague in April -- restricts each nation to a maximum of 1,550 deployed warheads, a cut of about 30 percent from a limit set in 2002.

The agreement, a top Obama foreign policy initiative, replaces a previous accord that lapsed in December 2009 and also requires ratification by Russia's lower house, the Duma.

US Senate ratification requires 67 votes, Democrats control 59 seats, and just three Republicans on the foreign relations committee voted in favor of the accord, with four against.

Republicans have charged the accord could hamper US missile defense plans -- a charge denied by the Pentagon -- have concerns about Russian implementation, and want assurances about plans to modernize the existing US nuclear arsenal.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hU3hhhWVseEeJ0TcmrvlilcfSH0A?docId=CNG.29e5f9ae941bd52cd3e12c591e89ab19.3c1


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E.  Nuclear Energy

1.
Japan Firms to Provide Nuclear Estimates to Kazakhstan
Reuters
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)


The Japan Atomic Power Company, Toshiba Corp and a unit of Marubeni Corp have reached an agreement with Kazakhstan to provide data and cost estimates on the possibility of the country building its first nuclear power plant.

In a joint statement, the three companies said on Wednesday that an agreement with the National Nuclear Center of Kazakhstan would enable them to cooperate in the building, operating and financing of a possible nuclear power plant.

If Kazakhstan decides to hold a feasibility study to build a nuclear facility based on the companies' estimates, that would provide a lucrative, but competitive business chance for nuclear technology exporters, including Japan.

Japan, the world's third biggest nuclear power generator, is stepping up its marketing of nuclear technology by establishing a new atomic technology exporting body next month.

Kazkhstan is looking to build an advanced boiling water reactor with a capacity of 1,000 megawatts or less, said a spokesman at Japan Atomic Power, Japan's oldest nuclear power company. ABWR is a proven technology in Japan although the capacity requested is smaller than usual.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTOE68S08D20100929



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2.
German Government Approves New Energy Plan
BBC News
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


Germany's government has given final approval to a plan to extend the life of nuclear reactors, reversing a decision of the previous government.

It hopes to pass the measures into law without putting them before the upper house of parliament, where the opposition has a majority.

Opponents say this is unconstitutional and have vowed to mount a challenge in Germany's highest court.

Ministers said nuclear was a "bridging technology" to a greener future.

The government presented five cabinet ministers in Berlin to argue its case in a show of unity which suggested it was aware of the strength of anti-nuclear feeling among the public.

Opinion polls suggest that six in 10 Germans want nuclear reactors closed.

The previous government - a coalition of the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD) and the Greens - had decided to shut down Germany's nuclear power stations by 2021.

Under the new plan, reactors will continue to function for an average of 12 years.

'Roadmap to renewable'
"For the first time in many years, a German government is setting out a energy plan for the long term," Economy Minister Rainer Bruederle told reporters.

"It sets out a good and detailed roadmap with the era of renewable energy as the destination."

The government wants to raise the share of renewable energy sources in power generation from the current 16% to 80% by 2050.

A small crowd - between 100 and 300 people - protested outside the German chancellery on Tuesday, waving banners with slogans such as No Thanks To Atomic Power.

Tens of thousands marched through Berlin earlier this month in protest at the plan.

Available at:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11425875


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3.
Malaysia Prepares for Nuclear Power Plant Construction
Xinhua News Agency
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


The Malaysian government has started its preparatory works to build its first nuclear power plant.

The plant was expected to start generating power in 2021, Malaysian Energy, Green Technology and Water Minister Peter Chin Fah Kui told reporters here on Tuesday.

"Our plan is for 2021, which now is about ten years, or eleven years gap between the actual implementation where the reactor is functioning," said Chin.

Chin said Malaysia is now at the preparatory stage of building the plant, adding that the country would have to first sign the relevant international treaties that it did not sign in the past.

"We have to look into proper legislation within the country. While doing that, we will then do the consultation process," Chin added.

The minister also said public consultation about the plan for nuclear power would take place between now and 2014.

The plan would be canceled if the Malaysian public rejected nuclear power.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-09/28/c_13534177.htm


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4.
Sri Lanka to Establish its First Nuclear Power Plant
Anuradha K. Herath
Allvoices
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)


Sri Lanka is aiming to establish the country’s first nuclear power plant within the next 20 years, according to the Minister of Power and Energy Patali Champika Ranawaka.

At a media briefing on Tuesday, Ranawaka said a pre-feasibility study is already being conducted by a team of experts from the Ceylon Electricity Board, the Atomic Energy Authority, the University of Moratuwa, and the Geological Survey and Mines Bureau. The team will complete the report in six months after which the feasibility study is scheduled to begin.

“Constructing a nuclear power plant is not easy,” Ranawaka said. “It is very difficult. It takes only six months to construct a wind power plant. It takes four months for a solar power plant, but it takes over 10 years for a nuclear plant.”

The island nation has faced several power crises during the past two decades. With a considerable reliance on hydropower, Sri Lanka is often at the mercy of the weather. For example, severe droughts in 1996 and 2002 forced the electricity board to cut power for large regions of the country for as long as six hours each day, including in major cities such as the capital Colombo. Not only does it inconvenience the public, it also has a significant impact on the economy.

Speaking at the 54th General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, Sept. 20, Ranawaka explained Sri Lanka’s need for nuclear energy.

“In order to meet our energy demands in the future, we need to feed our base load, as well as increase our spinning reserves to absorb non-conventional renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and mini-hydro,” Ranawaka said. “In meeting these development priorities and plans, Sri Lanka has therefore taken a decision to look into incorporating nuclear power into its energy mix.”

Back in Colombo, Ranawaka calmed fears that Sri Lanka may be pursuing nuclear options for activities other than power generation.

“Rumors are spreading that technology will be used for other purposes,” Ranawaka said. “According to the Atomic Energy Act, this technology is only for power generating purposes.”

Available at:
http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/6880908-sri-lanka-to-establish-its-first-nuclear-power-plant


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F.  Links of Interest

1.
US Asks Japan to Withdraw from Iran Oil Project
Reuters
9/29/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTOE68S08420100929


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2.
Denuclearization a Distant Dream
Kim So Yeol
Daily NK
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.dailynk.com/english/read.php?cataId=nk00100&num=6843


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3.
Iranian Lawmaker Urges UN Restructuring
PressTV
9/28/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/144420.html


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