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Nuclear News - 9/16/2010
PGS Nuclear News, September 16, 2010
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. West Hits Out at Iran Over Ban on Atom Inspectors, Fredrik Dahl and Sylvia Westall, Reuters (9/15/2010)
    2. Amano's Report Bears US Fingerprints, PressTV (9/15/2010)
    3. China Urges Peaceful Solution to Iranian Nuclear Issue, Xinhua News Agency (9/15/2010)
    4. Iran: IAEA in Error Over Tehran Nuclear Program, Associated Press (9/14/2010)
    5. Iran Can Thwart Sanctions by Hard Work, PressTV (9/14/2010)
B.  DPRK
    1. Easing Sanctions on North Korea 'Very Premature': US, AFP (9/15/2010)
    2. Weapons Needed to Neutralize North Korea WMDs, The Korea Herald (9/15/2010)
    3. US Envoy: No Quick Progress Likely on North Korea Talks, Associated Press (9/14/2010)
    4. Six-Party Talks "Fundamental" Way of Solving Korean Peninsula Nuclear Issue: Senior Chinese Diplomat, Xinhua News Agency (9/14/2010)
C.  India
    1. Work on Two More Fast Breeder Reactors Begins, Sify News (9/14/2010)
D.  Nonproliferation
    1. IAEA To Meet On Iran, Syria, Israel, Turkish Weekly (9/15/2010)
E.  Nuclear Energy
    1. Hong Kong to Replace Coal with Nuclear, World Nuclear News (9/15/2010)
    2. Kuwait Eyes Nuclear Power, Kalindi O'Brien, Gulf Times (9/14/2010)
F.  Links of Interest
    1. Health Risks From Exposure To Ionising Radiation To Be Studied, Medical News Today (9/15/2010)
    2. Iran Urges Enhanced Ties with Africa, PressTV (9/15/2010)
    3. NAM Urges Full Report on Israeli Nukes, PressTV (9/15/2010)
    4. Polish Nuclear Project Faces Further Delays, Patryk Wasilewski, Reuters (9/14/2010)
    5. Italy Needs Nuclear Energy to Grow, Dan Yurman, The Energy Collective (9/13/2010)



A.  Iran

1.
Amano's Report Bears US Fingerprints
PressTV
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


A senior Iranian lawmaker describes the latest report by the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on Iran's nuclear program as biased and mere propaganda.

“[Yukiya] Amano's remarks and his latest report bear witness to a unilateral biased approach towards Iran, which is swayed by western pressure, in particular, by the US,” Deputy Head of the National Security and Foreign Policy Committee of Iran's Majlis, Hossein Sobhani-Nia, told ISNA on Tuesday.

"The report by the head of the IAEA displays US fingerprints with the goal of exerting greater pressure on Iran," he went on to say.

Sobhani-Nia argued that the Islamic Republic expects Amano to act independently in handing over a report on Iran's nuclear issue, stressing that “the head of the IAEA should not side with the US; rather he should make a greater effort to find a solution to Iran's nuclear standoff with the West.”

Last week Amano released an IAEA report on Iran's nuclear endeavors which once again confirmed that the agency continued to "verify the non-diversion of declared nuclear material by Iran."

The report, however, urged the Islamic Republic to "cooperate in clarifying outstanding issues" and to suspend its uranium enrichment activities.

“Iran has always cooperated with the IAEA within the framework of the Additional Protocol, but the situation is different now as the UN Security Council has imposed sanctions on the Islamic Republic and the country has voluntarily suspended implementation of the Additional Protocol,” Sobhani-Nia further explained.

According to the Iranian parliamentarian, the IAEA is required to issue rational and unbiased reports due to its consultative role concerning nations' nuclear activities.

The senior lawmaker also criticized some IAEA inspectors for not reflecting the truth about Iran's nuclear facilities, stressing that “they are not suitable for this position.”

Last week, Iran barred two IAEA inspectors from entering the country on the grounds that they had leaked information to the media before the official issuance of the agency's latest report on Iran's nuclear program. Amano expressed his regret, stating that Tehran's objections would "hamper the inspection process."

“The Islamic Republic requests more reliable and expert inspectors; in such instances, there's room for further collaboration,” Sobhani-Nia added.

The Islamic Republic's collaboration with the IAEA hinges on the agency's unbiased attitude, he concluded.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/142564.html


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2.
China Urges Peaceful Solution to Iranian Nuclear Issue
Xinhua News Agency
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


China remained committed to solving the Iranian nuclear issue through dialogue and negotiation, a senior Chinese diplomat said here Wednesday.

As a State Party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), Iran had the right to peaceful use of nuclear energy, but also should fulfill the corresponding obligation under the NPT, said Hu Xiaodi, China's permanent representative and ambassador to the United Nations and Other International Organizations in Vienna.

Hu was addressing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) board meeting, which started Monday.

China hoped Iran would implement the IAEA and U.N. Security Council resolutions, and strengthen cooperation with the IAEA, so the international community could have greater confidence in the peaceful nature of its nuclear program, the Chinese envoy said.

Hu said that, as there were new opportunities for a diplomatic solution of the Iranian nuclear issue, the parties concerned should further expand diplomatic efforts for an early resumption of dialogue and negotiation.

On the issue of a proposed nuclear fuel swap deal for Iran's research reactor, Hu said China hoped the Vienna group would hold consultations and reach consensus with the Iranian side as soon as possible.

He also expressed hope the IAEA and the agency's director general would play a constructive role in solving the issue.

China had always been committed to facilitating talks and negotiations among the concerned parties and actively engaged in advancing the process of a diplomatic solution, Hu said.

He said, in line with safeguarding the NPT regime and taking into consideration the whole picture of peace and stability in the Middle East, China was willing to work with all sides for a comprehensive, lasting and proper solution of the issue, and to play a constructive role in the process.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-09/15/c_13513634.htm


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3.
West Hits Out at Iran Over Ban on Atom Inspectors
Fredrik Dahl and Sylvia Westall
Reuters
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


Western powers accused Iran on Wednesday of trying to intimidate the U.N. atomic agency by barring some nuclear inspectors and the United States warned Tehran of possible diplomatic consequences.

The dispute has further strained ties between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and deepened concern about Iran's nuclear program, which the West suspects is designed to develop atomic weapons.

IAEA Director-General Yukiya Amano said earlier this week Iran's refusal to admit some experienced inspectors was hampering the agency's work.

Iran, which says its nuclear program is aimed at generating electricity, said two inspectors it banned in June had provided false information about its activities.

It says it is its right to refuse inspectors under its non-proliferation accord with the U.N. body and the agency has a pool of more than 150 other experts it can use.

The U.S. envoy to the IAEA told a closed-door meeting of the agency's 35-country board that Iran was making a "clear effort" to intimidate inspectors and influence their work.

"It is unprecedented for a state to reject inspectors because they report accurately ... what they see and hear," U.S. ambassador Glyn Davies said according to a copy of his speech.

In a separate statement at the meeting, France, Germany and Britain voiced concern about what they called Iran's growing failure to cooperate with the U.N. body.

"Iran's refusal to fully cooperate with the IAEA and its deliberate attempts to prevent it from carrying out its mandate in Iranian territory are ... troubling and reprehensible," the statement read out by France said.

CONSEQUENCES POSSIBLE

"The Iranian authorities are clearly attempting to intimidate the agency so as to influence its ability to report to the board and undermine its ability to effectively implement the safeguards regime in its territory," it said.

Besides those barred in June, Tehran canceled access for a senior Middle East inspector in 2006 and has objected to several other designated inspectors in the past.

If Iran continues to refuse inspectors it could face diplomatic consequences at the IAEA, whose governors referred Iran's dossier to the U.N. Security Council in 2006 over its nuclear secrecy and lack of full cooperation.

Davies referred to language in the IAEA's agreements with member states governing inspections, which he said "indicates that the board should consider 'appropriate action' when inspections are being impeded" by the rejection of inspectors.

Amano's latest report on Iran showed it was pushing ahead with its nuclear work despite tougher sanctions imposed by the United Nations, the United States and the European Union.

It expressed growing frustration over what the IAEA sees as Iran's failure to respond to concerns about possible military dimensions to its activities.

The EU trio said Iran seemed "determined to pursue a nuclear program which could provide it with military capabilities."

Relations between Iran and the IAEA have deteriorated since Amano took over as head of the agency in December.

He has taken a firmer approach on Iran than his predecessor Mohamed ElBaradei, saying in reports to the board that Tehran could be trying to develop a nuclear-armed missile.

Iran has accused Amano of issuing misleading and politicized reports about its nuclear program. The head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, hit back at Amano on Tuesday, suggesting he had made a dangerous mistake by criticizing Iran for its rejection of inspectors.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE68E25120100915


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4.
Iran Can Thwart Sanctions by Hard Work
PressTV
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)


A senior Iranian official says the West has been piling up pressure on the Islamic Republic with toughest ever sanctions, urging hard work to overcome the pressure.

"During the past 30 years, we had a war and military threats but we have never seen the [global] arrogance… plan such a calculated assault against us," Chairman of Iran's Assembly of Experts Ayatollah Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani said in the 8th meeting of the assembly on Tuesday.

The senior Iranian official said that Iran was facing harshest ever sanctions but added that it could avoid them if "it utilizes all its political and scientific capacities."

Ayatollah Rafsanjani also criticized the recent report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), saying it offered nothing new but unjustly accused Iran of not cooperating since it did not allow certain IAEA inspectors to visit its nuclear facilities.

He further pointed out that the nuclear issue was a pretext for the West to pile up pressure on the Islamic Republic.

The IAEA released its latest report on Iran's nuclear work last Monday, in which it once again confirmed that it continued to "verify the non-diversion of declared nuclear material in Iran" but urged Iran to "cooperate in clarifying outstanding issues."

The agency also claimed in its latest report that Tehran's "repeated objections" to the designation of experienced inspectors could hamper the process of monitoring Iran's nuclear facilities.

Iran says that according to the terms of an agreement with the IAEA, it is Tehran's right to vet inspectors and member states are not obliged to provide a reason for such a decision.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/142451.html


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5.
Iran: IAEA in Error Over Tehran Nuclear Program
Associated Press
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran's nuclear chief has called remarks by the head of the U.N.'s atomic energy agency a dangerous mistake.

According to the state news agency Tuesday, Ali Akbar Salehi said "if Mr. Amano has expressed the remarks knowingly, he has committed a big mistake."

Salehi said the situation was dangerous because it meant the International Atomic Energy Agency was responding to external pressure.

Amano said Sunday the agency cannot confirm that all of Iran's atomic activities are peaceful because of Tehran's selective cooperation with nuclear inspectors chiding Iran for barring some of those inspectors.

Salehi reiterated that Iran has right to choose inspectors.

The West suspects Iran's nuclear program is covertly producing weapons, a charge Tehran denies.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iRqjZV1Meppj40hTs8IBOv4DdsQwD9I7ILTO0


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B.  DPRK

1.
Easing Sanctions on North Korea 'Very Premature': US
AFP
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


The US pointman on North Korea said Wednesday that diplomatic efforts were under way to revive talks to stem Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions but said easing sanctions now would be "very premature".

"We are looking for evidence that North Korea now regards the possibility of negotiations seriously... We want talks that leave specific and concrete results," said Stephen Bosworth, the US special envoy on North Korea.

The isolated and impoverished communist country has staged several atomic and missile tests, and in April last year walked out of six-nation talks to denuclearise the Korean peninsula.

It was also blamed by a multinational panel for the deadly sinking of a South Korean navy ship in March this year.

China, North Korea's closest ally, has in recent weeks urged a resumption of the talks, which have been hosted by Beijing and involved the two Koreas, the United States, China, Russia and Japan.

However, Bosworth cautioned that "there is no reason at the moment to expect that there is going to be a flurry of diplomatic activities in the next few weeks. This is going to take some time."

Bosworth said he and Japanese officials had agreed all sides must work in the coming weeks to "look for the right opportunity in the right moment to reignite the multilateral effort to denuclearise the Korean peninsula".

But he noted that Washington and its allies would maintain a so-called two-track strategy -- continuing to enforce UN and other sanctions against the reclusive state while remaining open to productive dialogue.

"To discuss sanctions at this point is very premature," he said.

"It is very important to underline that this whole process does not depend just on decisions by the five -- China, Russia, the US, Japan and South Korea. It depends very importantly on the decisions and actions of North Korea."

Bosworth said Washington had not ruled out direct talks with Pyongyang.

"We had those in the past and I think they can take place again," he said. "I think they will take place when we assess that it would be useful to do so."

Bosworth arrived in Tokyo from Seoul on Tuesday and was to leave for Beijing later Wednesday before returning home.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hhVHeTqlKU8P8QcRYr4acTm4sv4A


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2.
Weapons Needed to Neutralize North Korea WMDs
The Korea Herald
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


The chief of a presidential committee on defense advancement said Wednesday that South Korea should secure weapons capable of incapacitating the North’s weapons of mass destruction to deal with its growing military threats.

Lee Sang-woo of the 15-member committee made the remarks amid escalating public calls for military reform aimed at enhancing the country’s defense capabilities against North Korean provocations.

“Unless North Korea abandons its WMDs, South Korea, which has decided not to possess WMDs, has no way to be militarily superior to its communist neighbor,” Lee said during his keynote speech at a security seminar hosted by three local security research institutes.

“The South, which maintains a denuclearization policy, can prevent the North’s military superiority only when it has the non-nuclear precision strike capabilities that could incapacitate its WMDs before they are put to use.”

Lee, former head of Hallym University and professor of political science, also voiced caution against the planned troop drawdown. Under the Military Reform Plan 2020, which was crafted by the former Roh Moo-hyun government in 2005, the military plans to reduce the number of troops to 517,000 by 2020 from the current 650,000.

“Considering that the North has deployed ground troops two times more than ours in the frontline areas, the early reduction of our troops is not desirable,” Lee said.

“We should maintain our troops at a certain level until the North significantly reduces its ground troop numbers. We also need to maintain the term of mandatory military service at a certain level given our limited size of the military workforce.”

Lee also pointed out that the commanding structure in the military is too complicated for the troops to effectively and efficiently operate.

“The military has too many stages and its structure is complicated. Each unit with such a structure is controlled in a pyramid shape, which is inappropriate for the military to nimbly respond to any battle situation,” Lee said.

Touching on North Korean provocations, he stressed the need for the military to change its policy stance from a “passive defense strategy” to an “active deterrence strategy.”

Available at:
http://www.koreaherald.com/national/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20100915000798


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3.
Six-Party Talks "Fundamental" Way of Solving Korean Peninsula Nuclear Issue: Senior Chinese Diplomat
Xinhua News Agency
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)


The six-party talks are the fundamental way of solving the Korean Peninsula nuclear issue, a senior Chinese diplomat told the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) directors meeting here Tuesday.

From the long term perspective, the fundamental way of settling regional contradictions and disputes is through continuing to advance the six-party talks, achieving the conversion of the mechanism of armistice to peace, and finally establishing a security system of peace in Northeast Asia, said Hu Xiaodi, China' s permanent representative and ambassador to the United Nations and other international organizations in Vienna.

To this end, China hopes that no matter how situation changes, parties concerned should fix their attention on the overall situation, exercise restraint, resume direct dialogues and talks at an early date, Hu said, adding all sides should make joint efforts to achieve an early resumption of the six-party talks, and continue to advance the process of denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

Hu noted that the situation on the Korean Peninsula and in Northeast Asia is still sensitive and complex, with the six-party talks stalled.

The current situation once again shows that severe lack of mutual trust among parties concerned is the root cause of both frequent tensions in northeast Asia and difficulties for the six- party talks. Under such circumstances, the only way to gradually accumulate trust and seek to properly address concerns of each side in a balanced manner is through maintaining contacts, dialogues and frank communications, Hu said.

Hu said all parties should give serious thoughts on how to change the situation and put the Korean Peninsula issue back on the track of dialogue and consultation at an early date.

Hu also said that China is willing to work with all the parties concerned and the international community to achieve an early resumption of the six-party talks, play a constructive role for achieving denuclearization on the Korean Peninsular and maintaining peace and stability in northeast Asia.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-09/15/c_13495114.htm


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4.
US Envoy: No Quick Progress Likely on North Korea Talks
Associated Press
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)


No quick breakthroughs are likely in wooing North Korea back to nuclear disarmament talks although the U.S. remains open to a direct meeting, a senior U.S. envoy said Wednesday.

North Korea pulled out of the six-nation disarmament talks last year to protest international criticism of its long-range rocket launch. Prospects for restarting the talks were further undermined following the sinking of a South Korean warship in March.

"There is no reason to expect there is going to be a flurry of diplomatic activity in the next few weeks," Ambassador Stephen Bosworth, special envoy for North Korea policy, told reporters in Tokyo. "It is going to take some time."

It remains unclear whether the six-party nuclear talks will restart anytime soon because American, South Korean and Japanese officials have called on Pyongyang to come clean on the warship sinking and express a sincere willingness to disarm first. The North denies it launched a torpedo to sink the warship.

Bosworth, on a trip to Asia that includes stops in South Korea and China, said negotiators are not interested in resuming talks until it is clear that North Korea is prepared to make "specific and concrete" actions.

He added that discussing the lifting of sanctions imposed on the country by the United Nations, the U.S. and other countries can only occur once the North has shown a willingness to make progress in the talks.

He said discussing lifting sanctions at this point is "very premature."

"I would not rule out the possibility of direct U.S.-DPRK talks," he said, referring to North Korea's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. "What is important to us and other six-party partners is that North Korea takes the talks seriously."

The other member of the talks is Russia. Bosworth said he would visit Russia soon, although it was not part of his current trip.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5i_-KCTO71Z1ZmHIzC0rUm__sfbrAD9I818AG0


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C.  India

1.
Work on Two More Fast Breeder Reactors Begins
Sify News
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)


India's fast breeder reactor operator Bharatiya Nabhikiya Vidyut Nigam Ltd (Bhavini) has started preliminary work for the construction of two more units at Kalpakkam in Tamil Nadu.

'The government has released Rs.250 crore to carry out preliminary activities towards setting up of two more 500 MW fast reactors at Kalpakkam (around 80 km from here). We have started the site preparatory work where the two units are likely to be located,' Prabhat Kumar, project director at Bhavini, told IANS.

The funds will be utilised for preparation of detailed project report (DPR) and other pre-project activities such as levelling the site, laying of roads, setting up assembly shops and other activities.

The project site got approval from the site selection committee last year.

The government has sanctioned construction of four more 500 MW fast reactors, of which two will be housed inside the existing nuclear island at Kalpakkam, and are expected to be ready by 2020.

Decision on locating the remaining two fast reactors is yet to be taken.

A breeder reactor is one that breeds more material for a nuclear fission reaction than it consumes. The reaction produces energy that is used in the form of electricity. The Indian fast reactors will be fuelled by a blend of plutonium and uranium oxide.

While the reactor will break up (fission) plutonium for power production, it will also breed more plutonium than it consumes. The original plutonium comes from natural uranium.

The surplus plutonium from each fast reactor can be used to set up more such reactors and grow the nuclear capacity in tune with India's energy needs.

According to Kumar, environmental approvals have to be obtained for the project.

He said orders for some equipment needed for the pre-project works will also be ordered.

Meanwhile, the Rs.5,600 crore ($1.25 billion) prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) under construction at Kalpakkam, is expected to get its fourth critical component, the inner vessel, this week.

The sodium-cooled PFBR designed by the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) has three vessels - a safety vessel, a main vessel and an inner vessel.

Outer-most is the stainless steel safety vessel (200 tonnes, 13 metres in diameter and 13 metres in depth) which was lowered into the reactor vault in June 2008.

The main vessel - 12.9 metres in diameter and 12.94 metres in height, weighing 206 tonnes - was lowered into the safety vessel December 2009, and is termed as the second milestone.

The project achieved its third milestone in May this year when another critical component, thermal baffle, a cylindrical safety vessel weighing 60 tonnes, and measuring 12 metre in diameter and more than six metres in height, was lowered into the main vessel.

The 11-metre tall conical shaped inner vessel will be lowered into the main vessel to support reactor components like pumps, heat exchangers and others.

'We hope to lower the inner vessel Wednesday. However, it depends on the rain gods as the weather department has predicted rains over the next 48 hours,' Kumar said.

The PFBR is expected to start operations next September.

After erecting the inner vessel, the top opening will be covered with a component called 'roof slab' and the main vessel will be welded to it, said Kumar.

Other reactor components will be inserted into the main vessel through the opening in the roof slab.

Kumar is confident that 95 percent of the reactor components would be received by the end of this year.

Available at:
http://sify.com/finance/work-on-two-more-fast-breeder-reactors-begins-news-default-kjonOcdcjhe.html


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D.  Nonproliferation

1.
IAEA To Meet On Iran, Syria, Israel
Turkish Weekly
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


The Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to hold a meeting at the agency's headquarters to review Iran, Syria and Israel's nuclear programs, Press TV reported.

The IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano's latest report on Iran's nuclear program is due to be discussed in the regular meeting of the agency on Wednesday.

Amano's report, released early September, has reaffirmed Tehran's commitment to the agency's rules and confirmed the non-diversion of Iran's nuclear activities towards military or banned objectives.

Although the technical details of the report continue to evade most readers, it underscores the Islamic Republic's successful achievements in technical and scientific activities, particularly enrichment, Iran's Ambassador to the IAEA Ali Asghar Soltanieh told Fars news agency after the release of the report.

Earlier, the Iranian envoy said that he would provide the Board of Governors with a technical analysis of the IAEA report.

The Non-Aligned Movement's statement in support of Iran's nuclear program, released three days after Amano's report, will be read out by the Egyptian ambassador to the IAEA during the meeting.

The 35 members of the Board of Governors will also address Israeli and Syrian nuclear capabilities and IAEA technical cooperation programs as well.

Available at:
http://www.turkishweekly.net/news/107401/iaea-to-meet-on-iran-syria-israel.html


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E.  Nuclear Energy

1.
Hong Kong to Replace Coal with Nuclear
World Nuclear News
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)


A consultation put to the people of Hong Kong suggests an increase in nuclear capacity to supply half of electricity as a major plank of its climate change strategy.

The Special Administrative Region's government has explained its proposed approach to mitigation in a consultation document out for public comment until the end of the year. It covers five sectors: energy efficiency, road transport, road fuels, turning waste to energy and "revamping the fuel mix for electricity generation."

"Our objective is to reduce the proportion of coal in the overall fuel mix," said the document. The fossil fuel currently "dominates" city power supplies with 54% of generation, while 23% comes from natural gas.

With renewables neglibigle to date, the remaining 23% comes from CLP Power Hong Kong Limited's 25% stake in two 984 MWe reactors at Daya Bay in Guangdong Province. Some 70% of the power plant's output is routed to Hong Kong.

New coal power plants have not been allowed since 1997 and the latest units, from the 1980s, will retire in the period 2020-30. To handle the drop in coal's contribution below 10% by 2020, the government wants to increase natural gas generation to meet 40% of supply and to boost nuclear to 50%. Renewables are expected to grow to 3%, and remaining coal units would be kept on low utilization rates as reserve.

Boosting nuclear power is seen as the best way of replacing coal and thereby improving air quality - 1994 saw annual greenhouse gas emissions cut by about 7 million tonnes as imports began from Daya Bay. The other option, natural gas, would enable the city to cut greenhouse gases by about 50% compared to the coal generation replaced.

Despite certain policy independence, Hong Kong is bound by the climate change promises made by the Chinese Central Government in November 2009. These set a national target to reduce carbon intensity by 40-45% for each unit of national income, with nuclear power key to this along with efficiency and renewables. However, Hong Kong aythorities have set an ambitious absolute target of a 50-60% reduction in emissions by 2020. This is backed up by an agreement between Hong Kong and the government of Guangdong Province concerning the Pearl River Delta - a region home to up to 120 million people, many concentrated in large cities. A framework agreement between the two governments supports the aims of "gradually phasing out coal-fired generators in Hong Kong" and increasing the supply of "nuclear and other clean energy" to the city.

In its response to the consultation, CLP said it supports the government direction in leading the city towards a low-carbon economy. In September last year CLP's arrangements to take 70% of Daya Bay's output was extended to 2034 and in July the utility announced another nuclear investment. It will take a 17% stake in the Yangjiang nuclear power plant, where six nuclear power reactors should be in operation by 2017. Both these deals are between CLP and China Guangdong Nuclear Power Company.

The company said that increasing the import of nuclear power was feasible but would require a lot of work over the next decade: "If concensus is reached among the community that this is the right direction to go, we have to move fast." Commercial discussions take time, CLP warned, as does the establishment of cross-border infrastructure.

Available at:
http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/EE_Hong_Kong_to_replace_coal_with_nuclear_1509101.html


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2.
Kuwait Eyes Nuclear Power
Kalindi O'Brien
Gulf Times
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)


Kuwait will build four nuclear reactors over the next 12 years, a national nuclear energy official has said. Ahmad Bishara, secretary general of Kuwait’s National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC), said that Kuwait was planning to build four 1,000 megawatt reactors by 2022. Speaking to press in Tokyo, Bishara said construction would begin as early as January.

The move will make Kuwait, the world’s fourth largest oil exporter, the fourth Arab state to announce plans to build nuclear reactors for energy, after Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia.

“This is typical of the region,” Dr Theodore Karasik, director of security and defence studies at the Gulf Research Centre told Media Line. “Kuwait is following suit behind Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.”

“They need to do something,” Karasik said, pointing out that Kuwait faces an energy growth rate of some 7% a year. “They will have to figure it out as they go along.”

Bishara, secretary general of Kuwait’s nuclear committee, said the country would be able to afford nuclear development so long as the price of oil remained relatively stable.

“Our initial analysis indicates that nuclear is viable as long as oil is above $45 to $50 a barrel,” he said in Tokyo, adding that it was not yet clear how nuclear energy “fits in the energy mix of Kuwait for the next 20 years”.

Tomoko Murakami, a nuclear analyst at the Institute of Energy Economics, told journalists in Tokyo that Kuwait faced a greater energy crises than its Arab neighbours.

“Kuwait’s need to develop its power infrastructure is greater than other Arab countries” Murakami said. “Summer power shortages are severe.”

The Kuwaiti government has been taking a number of steps over the past few months to boost there alternative energy capacity. In April, Kuwait signed a nuclear co-operation agreement with France. This month, Bishara signed an additional co-operation agreement with Japan to enlarge Kuwait’s long term nuclear capacity.

The agreement will bring with it lucrative contracts for Japanese firms. Kuwait is the second Arab country over the past year to sign a nuclear deal with an Asian state, following a deal signed between the United Arab Emirates and South Korea last December.

Arab countries have taken a number of initiatives in recent years to expand their alternative energy sources. Saudi Arabia made plans in July with two firms in the United States and one from Japan to begin construction on what will be the nation’s first nuclear power plant. Following suit, in August Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced the site of Egypt’s first nuclear power plant along the Mediterranean coast.

Oil exporting nations have a vested interest in finding alternative sources of energy so as to maximise their oil exports. By investing in alternative energy now, Arab states hope to see gains in oil exports in the future.

Available at:
http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=385913&version=1&template_id=46&parent_id=26


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F.  Links of Interest

1.
Health Risks From Exposure To Ionising Radiation To Be Studied
Medical News Today
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/201179.php


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2.
Iran Urges Enhanced Ties with Africa
PressTV
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/142587.html


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3.
NAM Urges Full Report on Israeli Nukes
PressTV
9/15/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/142579.html


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4.
Polish Nuclear Project Faces Further Delays
Patryk Wasilewski
Reuters
9/14/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE68D2JZ20100914


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5.
Italy Needs Nuclear Energy to Grow
Dan Yurman
The Energy Collective
9/13/2010
(for personal use only)
http://theenergycollective.com/dan-yurman/43377/italy-needs-nuclear-energy-g..


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