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Nuclear News - 11/11/2010
PGS Nuclear News, November 11, 2010
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Iran Won't Talk About Limiting Nuclear Program, Associated Press (11/10/2010)
    2. Iran Nuclear Rights Not Negotiable, Ahmadinejad Says, BBC News (11/10/2010)
    3. Iran Says Ready to Test Domestic Air Defense System Similar to S-300, RIA Novosti (11/10/2010)
    4. Turkey Says Iran Proposes Nov. 23 or Dec. 5 as Date for Nuclear Talks, Xinhua News Agency (11/10/2010)
    5. UAE Merchants Protest Iran Sanctions, PressTV (11/10/2010)
B.  DPRK
    1. Talks 'Only Option' to End North Korea's Nuke Program, Associated Press (11/10/2010)
    2. North Korea Refuses to Make Concessions Before Six-Party Talks Resume, Sam Kim, Yonhap News Agency (11/10/2010)
    3. Medvedev Alarmed at North Korean Nuclear Activity, Reuters (11/9/2010)
C.  Nuclear Cooperation
    1. Lee, Medvedev Agree to Bolster Ties on Energy, Regional Security, Lee Chi-dong, Yonhap News Agency (11/10/2010)
    2. Venezuela Backs Russian Nuclear Deal, UPI (11/10/2010)
    3. US Approval of Arms Pact with Russia Looking Shaky, Associated Press (11/10/2010)
D.  Nuclear Energy
    1. Kazakhs to Build First Nuclear Plant by 2020, Costing $1 Billion, Halia Pavliva, Bloomberg (11/10/2010)
    2. Turkey May Assess Other Nuclear Plant Bids-Minister, Reuters (11/10/2010)
    3. Dubai May Pursue Own Nuclear Power Plans, Zawya (11/10/2010)
E.  Links of Interest
    1. Pakistan Says US Backing India UNSC Seat 'Incomprehensible', Masroor Gilani, AFP (11/10/2010)
    2. BP Ready to Shut North Sea Gas Field Over Iran Sanctions, AFP (11/10/2010)
    3. UN Reluctant to Push Syria on Nuclear Inspections, Haaretz (11/10/2010)



A.  Iran

1.
Iran Nuclear Rights Not Negotiable, Ahmadinejad Says
BBC News
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran will not discuss the nuclear issue in international talks proposed for later this year, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has said.

Last month, Iranian officials agreed to hold talks with a group of six world powers, at the invitation of EU foreign affairs chief Baroness Ashton.

But Mr Ahmadinejad said in a televised speech that Tehran was only prepared to discuss regional security issues, not its "basic right" to nuclear power.

Talks have stalled for over a year.

Iran says its nuclear programme is purely peaceful, but some Western powers fear it is aimed at developing weapons.

'Justice and respect'

The six countries involved in the talks are the five permanent members of the UN Security Council - the US, Russia, China, Britain and France - along with Germany.

EU envoy Baroness Ashton - who has a mandate from the group to negotiate - had proposed talks in November in Vienna, where the UN nuclear watchdog is based.

On Tuesday, Iran said it was ready for talks starting on 23 November or 5 December in Istanbul, Turkey.

Now, a day later, Mr Ahmadinejad has ruled out any discussion of the nuclear issue, though he said Iran was ready to discuss global co-operation on peace and security.

"We have said that the talks be based on justice and respect," he said in a televised speech in the central Iranian city of Qazvin. "That means you [the West] have to climb down from your ivory towers and put aside your arrogance."

Mr Ahmadinejad has previously set out conditions for any nuclear talks, including that the parties publicly declare their positions on Israel's reported nuclear arsenal.

Iran has repeatedly argued that as a member of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), it has the right to pursue "peaceful nuclear technology" for which it has begun a uranium enrichment drive.

There have been calls from the West for Iran to abandon the sensitive enrichment work, amid accusations it is pursuing a secret nuclear weapons programme.

In June, the UN Security Council adopted the fourth round of sanctions against Iran for its continued defiance.

Available at:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-11724424


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2.
Iran Says Ready to Test Domestic Air Defense System Similar to S-300
RIA Novosti
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran is set to test-fire a domestically-designed air defense system similar to the Russian S-300 after Russia refused to fulfill a delivery contract, the IRNA news agency said on Wednesday.

Russia signed a deal to deliver five battalions of S-300PMU-1 air defense systems to Iran in 2007 but banned the sale in September, saying the systems, along with a number of other weapons, were covered by the fourth round of sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council against Iran over its nuclear program in June.

"We had plans to purchase the S-300 from Russia as part of our agenda to meet some of our security needs, but under pressure from the United States and Israel, [Russia] refrained from delivering the defense system to our country," Brig. Gen. Mohammad Hassan Mansourian said.

"[Missile defense] systems similar to S-300 will soon undergo test firing and field modification while other long-range systems are also being designed and developed," Mansourian said.

The general also said Iran's air defenses would soon be strengthened with a new generation of Mersad and Shahin missiles.

The advanced version of the S-300 missile system, called S-300PMU1, has a range of over 150 kilometers (over 100 miles) and can intercept ballistic missiles and aircraft at low and high altitudes, making it an effective tool for warding off possible air strikes.

Russia has delivered 29 Tor-M1 short-range air defense missile systems to Iran under a $700-million contract signed in late 2005. Russia has also trained Iranian Tor-M1 specialists, including radar operators and crew commanders. The S-300 system is significantly superior to the Tor-M1.

Available at:
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20101110/161276003.html


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3.
Iran Won't Talk About Limiting Nuclear Program
Associated Press
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran's president says his country wants to discuss cooperation to resolve global issues and to promote peace and security at upcoming nuclear talks with world powers, but won't talk about what it insists is its right to continue nuclear activities.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad spoke Wednesday, a day after Iran offered to resume nuclear talks with six nations — the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. The talks collapsed last year and Ahmadinejad's comments raise further questions about whether Iran is willing to reopen the dialogue on its nuclear program.

The U.S. and its allies suspect Iran's nuclear program is aimed at producing weapons, though Iran denies this.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hbhM19PMFU4OqTv7ZP2VQEbEnTiw?docId=36bd8da87cbe4a74a8d2fbaf12dce99f


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4.
Turkey Says Iran Proposes Nov. 23 or Dec. 5 as Date for Nuclear Talks
Xinhua News Agency
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Wednesday that Iran has proposed either Nov. 23 or Dec. 5 as the date for planned talks with major powers on its nuclear program in Istanbul, local media reported.

Iranian officials had two proposals on the date of the negotiations with the five UN Security Council permanent members and Germany (G5+1) and were waiting for a response, Erdogan was quoted by the semi-official Anatolia news agency as saying.

Iranian media reported Tuesday that Iran sent an official letter to the European Union's foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton on Tuesday and proposed the date and place for talks. Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki was quoted by local Mehr news agency as saying they were considering Nov. 15 as the date.

Erdogan said the Iran nuclear issue could come up during his meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the G20 summit, which is due on Thursday and Friday in South Korea.

In October, Ashton said in Brussels that Iran has announced readiness to resume talks over the nuclear program after Nov. 10, which had been suspended since October 2009 when the two sides met in Geneva.

Iran has reiterated that its potential upcoming talks with G5+1 will not only include the country's controversial nuclear issue, but should encompass diverse range of global issues which are of interests for both sides.

Western countries have called on Tehran to halt its sensitive nuclear program, but the country ruled out the calls and repeated that its nuclear activities aim at civilian purposes.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-11/10/c_13600858.htm


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5.
UAE Merchants Protest Iran Sanctions
PressTV
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Businessmen in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have protested the restrictions imposed on trades with Iran due to Western sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

A group of exporters and importers of food, construction materials, medicine and auto spare parts in Dubai met with UAE's Prime Minister Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum on Monday, calling on him to protect Dubai's commerce sector against the losses inflicted by the US-led sanctions.

The merchants reportedly called on the UAE premier, who is also the vice president, to intervene and ease the obstacles imposed by the UN Security Council's (UNSC) sanctions disrupting trade with the neighboring Iran.

They complained about restrictions imposed by banks in terms of opening letters of credit and finance so as to fulfill their contracting obligations with their partners.

In June, the UNSC agreed to Israeli and US-engineered sanctions against Iran's nuclear program, citing "unresolved concerns" about the nature of Islamic Republic's nuclear activity.

Tehran has repeatedly dismissed Western accusation of efforts to produce nuclear weapons, insisting the nuclear program is solely aimed at civilian purposes in the fields of research and energy.

In line with the sanctions, the UAE has banned 41 international and domestic companies from trade with Iran for violating the US sanctions against the Islamic Republic by sending materials of "possible military use" to Iran.

The central bank in the UAE has also frozen more than two dozen bank accounts belonging to Iranian juristic and natural persons.

Iran is one of the UAE's major trading partners with around USD eight billion in bilateral trade in 2009. The figure is, however, expected to fall to USD six billion this year after the sanctions by the US and its allies have been imposed.

Some 25,000 companies registered in the UAE, which have done business with Iran for over four decades, have lost 40 percent of their business due to banking restrictions.

Iran's Business Council earlier warned that bilateral trade between the UAE and Iran is nearing "a standstill" because local banks "are going beyond UN sanctions to prevent almost all transactions tied to the Islamic Republic."

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/150362.html


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B.  DPRK

1.
North Korea Refuses to Make Concessions Before Six-Party Talks Resume
Sam Kim
Yonhap News Agency
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


North Korea on Wednesday ruled out allowing international nuclear monitors back on its soil and freezing its atomic activities as gestures toward the resumption of six-nation denuclearization talks.

In an editorial, the Rodong Sinmun, the paper of the North's ruling Workers' Party, instead demanded that South Korea retract its accusation that the communist state attacked the Cheonan, a South Korean warship that sank in March near their Yellow Sea border.

"It is South Korea and the United States that have blocked the resumption process of the six-party talks by raising the Cheonan warship issue which we have no relation to," the paper said.

The six-party talks, which the North has insisted should reopen, also involve South Korea, the U.S., Japan, Russia and China.

Commenting on South Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, who said last month that the North should make concessions over its nuclear arms programs before the talks can reopen, the paper said his remark was "vain."

"Not only that, he is admonishing us to allow International Atomic Energy Agency monitors back in and announce the freezing of atomic facilities. Kim Sung-hwan must be unable to see what the real obstacle to the resumption of six-party talks is," it said.

South Korea initially opposed resuming the talks until the North apologizes for the sinking. Officials here, however, have suggested in the past few months that an apology is not a prerequisite to resuming the talks, which have been stalled since late 2008.

Citing a multinational investigation, South Korea concluded in May that the North was responsible for the sinking that killed 46 sailors. South Korea has since held a series of naval drills, often teaming up with the U.S., in a show of force against the North, drawing bitter statements from Pyongyang.

In a meeting Wednesday with a U.S. expert on Korean affairs, Jack Pritchard, who met with North Korean foreign ministry officials in Pyongyang last week, South Korea's Vice Unification Minister Um Jong-sik reiterated that the North should show "a responsible attitude" over the Cheonan sinking in order to improve inter-Korean relations.

South and North Korea remain technically at war after the 1950-53 Korean War ended in a truce. Tension remains at the highest point in years after the warship sinking blamed on a North Korean torpedo.

In a separate article, the Rodong Sinmun called on the South to agree to talks over cross-border tours to a mountain resort in the North that were suspended in 2008 over the shooting death of a tourist from Seoul.

South Korea has yet to respond to a weeks-old proposal by North Korea that the sides hold talks to discuss ways to restore the tours, a rare cash cow for the impoverished North.

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/2010/11/10/44/0401000000AEN20101110008800315F.HTML


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2.
Talks 'Only Option' to End North Korea's Nuke Program
Associated Press
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Russia said Wednesday that dialogue remains the only option for ending North Korea's nuclear weapons program as Pyongyang accused South Korea and the U.S. of blocking the stalled talks.

"As room for conflict remains in Northeast Asia and Asia Pacific region, I believe that countries have no choice but to hold dialogue and cooperate," Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said at a joint news conference with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak. "I believe there is no other option."

A statement said the two leaders agreed to cooperate to revive the talks, which brought together the two Koreas, the United States, China, Japan and Russia.

North Korea pulled out of the talks last year to protest international condemnation of a long-range rocket launch seen as a test of its missile technology.

North Korea has recently shown willingness to rejoin the negotiations. But at the same time it has continued to blame its chief foes, the United States and South Korea, for the stalemate.

Pyongyang says if the two countries are serious about resuming negotiations they should stop their military drills that it claims pose a nuclear threat.

The drills are in response to the sinking of a South Korean warship in March. A multinational investigation led by Seoul concluded a torpedo fired by a North Korean submarine sank the 1,200-ton warship. North Korea has denied involvement in the sinking, which killed 46 South Korean sailors.

"The six-nation talks would be naturally resumed" if South Korea and the U.S. stop interfering, North Korea's main Rodong Sinmun newspaper said. The commentary was carried by the country's official Korean Central News Agency.

North Korea carried out two nuclear tests in 2006 and in 2009 in the country's northeastern area, drawing international sanctions each time.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who like Medvedev is in Seoul for the Group of 20 summit this week, urged North Korea to rejoin the nuclear talks.

"We expect that they will return to six-party talks and cooperate fully in realizing a denuclearized Korean peninsula," Ban, a former South Korean foreign minister, told reporters.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5irzL7_p2PFnch_fSp0HX_QxiPayA?docId=1ca27d10c6464405a6871db05c13225f


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3.
Medvedev Alarmed at North Korean Nuclear Activity
Reuters
11/9/2010
(for personal use only)


Russian President Dmitry Medvedev voiced alarm over North Korea's nuclear weapons programme in an interview published on Tuesday on the eve of his visit to South Korea.

Medvedev told South Korean media that Pyongyang's programme "presents a systemic challenge to the international nuclear non-proliferation regime" and said he was worried about nuclear activities close to Russia's borders.

"Naturally it alarms us that North Korea's nuclear ambitions create military and political tension in Northeast Asia, in direct proximity to Russia's eastern frontiers," Medvedev said in the interview posted on the Kremlin website.

"Not to mention that the North Korean nuclear testing ground is located just a little more than 100 km (62 miles) from our territory."

North Korea's nuclear activities are likely to come up in Medvedev's talks with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak and with world leaders attending a G20 summit in South Korea this week, including President Barack Obama and China's Hu Jintao.

As in the past, Medvedev stressed that the stand-off must be resolved through peaceful diplomacy.

A Soviet-era supporter of North Korea, Moscow is one of five regional powers -- along with the United States, China, Japan, South Korea -- pressing Pyongyang to curb nuclear activities.

But six-way talks to denuclearise the Korean peninsula have been frozen since December 2008 because of disputes over how to verify North Korean steps to disable its nuclear programme, and Pyongyang declared the process dead earlier this year.

Russia has voiced disquiet at Pyongyang's tests of nuclear devices and a long-range missile since 2006.

Russia has also leaned harder on Iran, a longtime trade partner and weapons client, to rein in its nuclear energy programme in recent months, but Medvedev suggested North Korea was more of a threat.

"Despite the fact that Iran is often given special attention, I should note that Tehran, unlike Pyongyang, has not declared itself a nuclear power, has not tested a nuclear weapon and ... has not threatened to use one," he said.

The Kremlin chief's remarks preceded the imminent publication -- delayed for months by China in an effort to protect states with which it has close relations -- of a U.N. report suggesting that North Korea may have supplied Syria, Iran and Myanmar with banned nuclear technology.

Available at:
http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE6A84B120101109


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C.  Nuclear Cooperation

1.
Lee, Medvedev Agree to Bolster Ties on Energy, Regional Security
Lee Chi-dong
Yonhap News Agency
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


South Korean President Lee Myung-bak and his Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev agreed Wednesday to further develop a "strategic cooperative partnership" between the two sides, especially in countering regional security threats, including the North Korean nuclear program.

The leaders also agreed to work together for "substantial accomplishments" in cooperation on trade, investment, energy, resources, infrastructure and cutting-edge technology.

"We agreed to cooperate closely to create conditions for the resumption of the six-way talks (on the North Korean nuclear crisis)," Lee said in a televised press conference after a summit with the Russian leader.

Medvedev arrived here earlier Wednesday for a three-day state visit on the occasion of the G-20 economic summit in Seoul. The nuclear negotiations, also involving the U.S., China and Japan, have stalled for two years amid tensions over the North's provocative acts highlighted by missile and nuclear tests and a deadly naval attack on South Korea.

Lee added that Seoul and Moscow will make joint efforts to cope effectively with global challenges such as climate change, terrorism, narcotics trafficking, piracy and cyber crimes.

He took note of remarkable development in the two nations' relations since the establishment of diplomatic ties in 1990, including the 2008 agreement to upgrade the bilateral relationship to a strategic cooperative partnership.

"I am very happy that the two nations have become able to develop the relations by one more notch through the visit by President Medvedev this time," Lee said.

Sitting next to Lee, Medvedev stressed the importance of a multilateral security channel, saying, "There is still possibility of conflict in the Northeast Asian and Asia-Pacific regions."

After the talks, Lee and Medvedev attended the signing ceremony of about two dozen pacts between the two nations, which included memorandums of understanding on partnership on Russia's economic modernization project, maritime cooperation and easing of visa regulations for South Korean workers and their families in Russia.

Yonhap News Agency, South Korea's key news wire service, and Russia's Itar-Tass News Agency also signed an agreement on expanding partnership in multimedia news service and co-sponsoring cultural activities between the two nations.

Medevedev pointed out the strengthening of legal and institutional systems via such diplomatic pacts will "buttress" Seoul-Moscow ties.

In a 27-point joint statement, the leaders also "attached big meaning" to the measures to broaden human and other exchanges.

Russia proposed South Korea's participation in a project to set up an "international nuclear energy infrastructure" and a global uranium enrichment center in Angarsk, an East Siberian city, the document said. Seoul is to review the offer.

The two sides said they will try to fully implement earlier agreements on joint development of East Siberia, which is rich in natural resources, and step up efforts for a greater role of the Group of 20 and the success of its Seoul summit this week, it added.

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/national/2010/11/10/52/0301000000AEN20101110010400315F.HTML


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2.
US Approval of Arms Pact with Russia Looking Shaky
Associated Press
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Senate approval of President Barack Obama's nuclear arms treaty with Russia, which once looked close to a sure thing, is now in jeopardy.

The administration is scrambling to get enough Republican support in the Senate to ratify the New START treaty before the Democrats' majority shrinks by six in January. But Republicans have little incentive to give Obama a big political boost after leaving him reeling from their strong gains in last week's congressional elections.

A failure to win passage could trip up one of the administration's top foreign policy goals: improving relations with Russia. The treaty, signed in April by Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, has been the most tangible sign of success, and failure to get it ratified could be viewed as a rebuke in Moscow. It also would leave Obama's push for even greater restrictions on the world's nuclear arsenal in doubt.

Some Republicans have argued that the treaty would limit U.S. missile defense options and does not provide adequate procedures to verify that Russia is living up to its terms. Advocates dispute both charges.

A broader Republican fear is that the treaty is a small step toward weakening the U.S. nuclear deterrent. Though the treaty would only modestly affect the current U.S. arsenal, many Republicans see Obama's vision of a gradual elimination of the world's nuclear weapons as unrealistic. They argue that U.S. nuclear might is critical for American security and global stability.

The Obama administration is worried that ratification could slip out of reach if a vote were to be delayed. Ellen Tauscher, the undersecretary of state for arms control, said this week that the lame-duck session Congress will convene before most newly elected senators take their seats in January could be the administration's last shot.

"Our last opportunity to do it coming forward is in the lame duck," she said. "I think that, frankly, because of the way the numbers are working, it's the best opportunity to do it."

Republicans will gain one vote part of the way through the lame-duck session because they won a special election for Obama's former seat in Illinois. That will increase the GOP's Senate numbers temporarily to 42 in the 100-member chamber.

Since the election, senior administration officials, including Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, have been pressing the case for ratification with Republican lawmakers. A long list of retired generals and senior statesmen from both parties have expressed support, arguing that that the treaty should be beyond politics.

But its best shot seems to lie in a political deal with one key Republican senator.

Republican Jon Kyl has wielded the most sway in his party on the issue. He has been negotiating with the administration for months and pinning support for the treaty to a boost in funding to modernize the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons. A number of his Republican colleagues have said they will follow his lead on the treaty. His approval could push support beyond the 67 votes the administration needs for ratification, although many Republicans still are likely to oppose it.

The administration has countered Kyl by warning that the lame-duck session also will be his last chance to get the money he is seeking for the nuclear stockpile because Democrats will not support him next year should the treaty fail.

The treaty would reduce the limit on strategic warheads to 1,550 for each country from the current ceiling of 2,200. It also would set up new procedures to allow both countries to inspect each other's arsenals to verify compliance.

Treaty advocates have been warning that the United States has not had nuclear inspectors in Russia since December, when a previous treaty expired. They say Republicans who have opposed the treaty are endangering national security by delaying the inspectors' return.

Arlen Jameson, a retired Air Force general and former deputy chief of the Strategic Air Command, says a long delay in returning U.S. inspectors could force the U.S. military and intelligence agencies to find other ways to monitor Russian nuclear forces. He said that would involve costly monitoring by satellites that would shift scarce intelligence resources from operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"The needs for overhead monitoring is already under great stress," he said. "The expense will not be transparent because it will be not made publicly available, but it will be enormous."

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hF9vNCJ6MXDUI5rxMbnDMeueL3dQ?docId=f508a4ba27a94720b83778d606ada511


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3.
Venezuela Backs Russian Nuclear Deal
UPI
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Venezuela could designate 15 million barrels of oil for export through a nuclear power plant planned with Russia's help, the parliament announced.

Venezuela ratified a deal with Russia on nuclear cooperation. The government said the deal would "save up to a billion dollars a year by exporting 15 million barrels of oil that are now spent on producing the equivalent volume of electricity," Russia's state-run news agency RIA Novosti quoted the parliament as stating.

Moscow aims to expand its nuclear partnerships with its international partners. Russia is working in Iran on a nuclear power plant and landed new nuclear deals with Ankara and Beijing. More deals are in the works in India and the Czech Republic.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez signed a nuclear cooperation deal with his Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev during his October visit to Moscow.

Russia aims to build two 1,200 megawatt reactors at a Venezuelan plant, marking the first nuclear power project in Latin America.

Russian power companies said they would be ready to go on plant construction within the next 10 years.

Available at:
http://www.upi.com/Science_News/Resource-Wars/2010/11/10/Venezuela-backs-Russian-nuclear-deal/UPI-16501289393821/


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D.  Nuclear Energy

1.
Dubai May Pursue Own Nuclear Power Plans
Zawya
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Dubai doesn't rule out pursuing nuclear power projects on its own and has embarked on preliminary studies looking into possible alternatives to neighboring Abu Dhabi's atomic energy plans, an official at Dubai's top energy body said Wednesday.

"We have two directions: one is with Abu Dhabi and the other is studying what we can do in Dubai by 2030," Waleed Ali Ahmed Salman, a member of Dubai's Supreme Council of Energy, said Wednesday.

"We study all options and want to feel comfortable about what things we can do in Dubai. The clear picture for us today is Abu Dhabi but we are doing pre-planning studies" for nuclear power in Dubai, Salman said.

Dubai is focusing on securing and diversifying its energy resources in the next two decades and in 2009 set up the Supreme Council of Energy as an independent legal entity, whose task is to oversee all matters relating to the energy sector. These include exploration, production, storage, transport, and distribution of natural gas, gas liquids, petroleum products, and crude oil, as well as services related to these activities.

The council is also concerned with the generation and distribution of electricity for public consumption, as well as production of electricity from renewable sources, and generation of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, notably for electricity and desalination plants.

Despite its petroleum wealth, the oil-rich U.A.E. has ambitions to diversify its energy portfolio away from hydrocarbons. Forecasts show the country's power demand growing sharply over the next two decades, far outstripping its current capacity.

Studies conducted by the Government of Abu Dhabi show that national annual peak demand for electricity is calculated to rise more than 40,000 megawatts by 2020, a cumulative annual growth rate of about 9%.

Through the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corp., or ENEC, the U.A.E. hopes to deliver additional safe, clean, efficient and reliable nuclear energy to the U.A.E. grid by 2017.

Analysts said however it may be wiser for Dubai to remain focused on the pan-U.A.E. ENEC project.

"It's surprising because it will be very expensive for Dubai to do a nuclear project alone, we are talking billions of dollars and Dubai has recently rescheduled their debt," one U.A.E.-based analyst, who didn't want be named, said.

Available at:
http://www.zawya.com/Story.cfm/sidZW20101110000151/Dubai%20May%20Pursue%20Own%20Nuclear%20Pwr%20Plans;%20Studies%20On%20-Official


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2.
Kazakhs to Build First Nuclear Plant by 2020, Costing $1 Billion
Halia Pavliva
Bloomberg
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Kazakhstan plans to build its first nuclear plant, at an estimated cost of $1 billion, by 2020 as the world’s biggest producer of uranium seeks to diversify its sources of energy.

The former Soviet republic is in talks with Japan’s Toshiba Corp., Rosatom Corp., Russia’s state nuclear power company, and French companies, according to Nurmuhambet Abdibekov, the Kazakh deputy minister of industry and new technologies. Toshiba and Marubeni Utility Services signed a memorandum of understanding with Kazakhstan’s National Nuclear Center to estimate the cost of the plant and help prepare a feasibility study.

“We need modern technology as we seek to develop nuclear power production,” Abdibekov said in an interview in New York yesterday. “We are in talks first of all with the Russians. We are in talks with Toshiba and French companies over equipment supplies and their potential participation in construction. That decision will, to a certain extent, depend on their ability to get financing for the project.”

Kazakhstan will increase uranium exports as it seeks to develop its own nuclear power plant on expectations that the world’s oil resources will run out, Abdibekov said. Kazakhstan holds 3 percent of the world’s oil reserves according to BP Plc, and is central Asia’s biggest energy producer.

The government plans to provide financing for the nuclear plant through Kazatomprom, the nation’s state-owned uranium producer, Abdibekov said. He declined to say whether the company would sell bonds or borrow via syndicated loans to finance the plant.

Kazatomprom set up a joint venture with Areva SA, the world’s largest builder of atomic power plants, to make nuclear fuel for use in reactors in Asia in 2014, the company said Oct. 28.

Available at:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-11-10/kazakhs-to-build-first-nuclear-plant-by-2020-costing-1-billion.html


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3.
Turkey May Assess Other Nuclear Plant Bids-Minister
Reuters
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)


Turkey may assess bids from Europe and other countries to build a nuclear power plant on the Black Sea if it fails to reach a deal with South Korea on the plant, Energy Minister Taner Yildiz told Reuters on Wednesday.

He said talks on the planned plant at Sinop in northern Turkey would continue at the G-20 meetings in Seoul, but that a deal with South Korea would not be possible if that country failed to take the necessary steps in negotiations.

Available at:
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSIST00733820101110


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E.  Links of Interest

1.
BP Ready to Shut North Sea Gas Field Over Iran Sanctions
AFP
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5j2Dp2dGFgO8glmUzvR7xLWs0u..


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2.
Pakistan Says US Backing India UNSC Seat 'Incomprehensible'
Masroor Gilani
AFP
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hqokKjhz3yw9OsokgA4toSAMh..


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3.
UN Reluctant to Push Syria on Nuclear Inspections
Haaretz
11/10/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.haaretz.com/news/international/un-reluctant-to-push-syria-on-nucl..


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