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Nuclear News - 10/7/2010
PGS Nuclear News, October 7, 2010
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Ahmadinejad Tells West to Put More Pressure on Iran, AFP (10/5/2010)
    2. Iran Claims Computer Worm is Western Plot, Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press (10/5/2010)
    3. Iran Backs Negotiations Recognizing its Nuclear Rights with West: Spokesman, Xinhua News Agency (10/5/2010)
B.  DPRK
    1. South Korea: North Korea's Nuclear Threat 'Dangerous', Sangwon Yoon, Associated Press (10/6/2010)
    2. Chinese Premier Hopes for Early Resumption of Six-Party Talks, Xinhua News Agency (10/6/2010)
    3. ASEM Leaders Urge North Korea to Abandon Nukes, Halt Military Provocation, Lee Chi-dong, Yonhap News Agency (10/5/2010)
    4. North Korea Restores Facilities at Nuclear Reactor, AFP (10/5/2010)
    5. North Korea Likely to Bolster Nuclear Activity, Kang Hyun-kyung, The Korea Times (10/5/2010)
C.  Nonproliferation
    1. Pakistan Steps Up Nuclear Construction, AFP (10/5/2010)
D.  Nuclear Cooperation
    1. Korea, Turkey to Discuss Nuclear Industry Cooperation, The Korea Herald (10/6/2010)
    2. Germany to End 'Nuclear Sharing' with US, The Local (10/6/2010)
E.  Nuclear Energy
    1. NAM Wants Access to Nuclear Material and Technology, Lilian Budianto, The Jakarta Post (10/6/2010)
    2. Bushehr Reactor Gets Fuel Load in October, PressTV (10/6/2010)
    3. Nuclear Power Plants Can Meet Mideast’s Needs: Expert, Ramesh Mathew, Gulf Times (10/6/2010)
    4. No State Subsidies for New Nuclear Plants, Sweden PM Says, Reuters (10/5/2010)
F.  Links of Interest
    1. U.A.E. Cuts Off Ties to Iran Banks, Chip Cummins and Jay Solomon, The Wall Street Journal (10/6/2010)
    2. A Look at North Korea's Nuclear Arms Programme, Reuters (10/6/2010)
    3. UN Hosts Nuke Abolition Exhibition in Vienna, Ramesh Jaura, In Depth News (10/5/2010)



A.  Iran

1.
Ahmadinejad Tells West to Put More Pressure on Iran
AFP
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad challenged the West on Tuesday to put more pressure on Iran, which he said would fail to make any impact on the Islamic republic or its atomic programme.

Ahmadinejad, in an address to the people of the northeastern province of Golestan, said that during a trip he made last month to the United States, people there "were insisting that the sanctions have affected us."

"And I, on your behalf, insisted and told them 'The sanctions have had no effect, and whatever the heck you want to do in the next two years, do it now so we see what you are capable of'," he said in the speech broadcast live on state television.

Ahmadinejad and other Iranian officials repeatedly dismiss the effects of sanctions imposed on Tehran for pursuing its atomic programme.

The United Nations Security Council imposed a fourth set of sanctions against Iran on June 9, which were followed by tougher measures from the United States, the European Union and some other countries.

The West led by Washington suspects that Iran is seeking to make atomic weapons under the guise of a civilian nuclear programme, a charge denied by Tehran.

Ahmadinejad visited New York last month to attend the UN General Assembly meeting, where he infuriated Washington by raising questions over the September 11, 2001 terror attacks on the United States.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jKYC9aIgeCasFW9YAZKX0G-26WHA?docId=CNG.b4f78a36c7b572cde0d946ad2a4390fc.321


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2.
Iran Backs Negotiations Recognizing its Nuclear Rights with West: Spokesman
Xinhua News Agency
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Iranian Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said Tuesday that Iran will support talks with the West which leads to the recognition of its nuclear rights.

Iran has reiterated that it will only endorse the talks with the West which lead to the recognition of the country's nuclear rights, Mehmanparast said at his weekly press briefing.

Iran will not slacken from its inalienable nuclear rights at any cost, he said.

Western countries have called on Tehran to halt its sensitive nuclear program but the country has ruled out the calls and insisted that its nuclear activities are aimed at civilian purposes.

Tehran has already said that, on a nuclear fuel swap deal for a Tehran research reactor based on Tehran Declaration, it is ready for the talks with the Vienna group, comprising the United States, France, Russia and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

In a tripartite meeting in Tehran on May 17, Iran signed an agreement with Turkey and Brazil, dubbed Tehran Declaration, to endorse a fuel swap deal, in which Iran agreed to ship most of its low enriched uranium to Turkey in exchange for the 20 percent uranium fuel needed for its Tehran research reactor.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-10/05/c_13543519.htm


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3.
Iran Claims Computer Worm is Western Plot
Ali Akbar Dareini
Associated Press
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran claimed Tuesday that a computer worm found on the laptops of several employees at the country's nuclear power plant is part of a covert Western plot to derail its nuclear program.

Iranian officials have suggested in recent days that the Stuxnet worm that has affected computers of employees at the Bushehr nuclear power plant could be a conspiracy to damage Iran's nuclear activities. But Tuesday's comments by Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast were the strongest accusations of Western sabotage so far.

The United States, Israel and others accuse Iran of seeking to use the Bushehr nuclear power plant and other civil nuclear sites as a cover for a secret program to develop atomic weapons. Iran insists its nuclear program is peaceful.

Mehmanparast said sabotage and pressure won't make Iran stop its nuclear activities.

"They (the West) have shown by their words and actions that they try, through any possible means, to prevent or delay our peaceful nuclear activities," Mehmanparast told a news conference. "These actions won't make us give up our (nuclear) rights at all. These methods won't help stop or delay nuclear activities in our country," he added.

The malicious computer code, designed to take over industrial sites such as the Bushehr nuclear plant, has also emerged in India, Indonesia and the U.S. Iran said the Stuxnet worm infected personal computers of Bushehr employees but not the plant's main systems.

The startup of Bushehr has been delayed but on Monday, Iran's Vice President Ali Akbar Salehi said it was not because of Stuxnet. He said a leak was delaying the start.

Who created the Stuxnet code and what its precise target is, if any, remains a mystery. Some foreign experts have speculated it was designed to target Tehran's nuclear program.

The web security firm Symantec Corp. says the computer worm was likely spawned by a government or a well-funded private group. It was apparently constructed by a small team of as many as five to 10 highly educated and well-funded hackers, Symantec says.

The Bushehr plant has stood outside the current controversy over Iran's nuclear program since Russia will be providing the fuel for the plant and supervising its disposal.

But other aspects of Iran's nuclear work, especially its enrichment of uranium, are of concern to the United States and other world powers. Enrichment can be used to produce weapons as well as make fuel for power plants.

Iranian Intelligence Minister Heidar Moslehi has announced the arrests of several people it alleged were suspected of nuclear espionage but he gave no details and did not clearly link the suspects with the investigation into Stuxnet.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iRqjZV1Meppj40hTs8IBOv4DdsQwD9ILGQ4O0?docId=D9ILGQ4O0


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B.  DPRK

1.
Chinese Premier Hopes for Early Resumption of Six-Party Talks
Xinhua News Agency
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


China expected an early resumption of the six-party talks to ease tensions and resolve the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao said here on Tuesday.

All parties should make joint efforts to ease tensions between the south and the north on the peninsula and strive to resume the six-party talks at an early date, said Wen while meeting South Korean President Lee Myung-bak on the sidelines of the eighth Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) Summit in Brussels.

"This is in the fundamental interests of all parties involved and is conducive to peace and stability in the region," he said.

The six-party talks, a multilateral mechanism designed to peacefully denuclearize the Korean Peninsula, were launched in 2003. The talks involve China, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), Japan, South Korea, Russia and the United States.

Speaking of the upcoming Group of 20 (G20) Seoul Summit, slated for Nov. 11-12, Wen said it was of great significance for boosting the world economic recovery, adding that China would support South Korea in seeking positive outcomes at the meeting.

Wen said China regards South Korea as a friendly neighbor and an important partner. It also cherished the hard-won mutual understanding and trust between the two countries, believing the bilateral ties could withstand tests and continue to develop.

China would also work with South Korea to boost cooperation in East Asia, Wen added.

Lee appreciated China's support for Seoul G20 summit, saying his country would keep working with China to improve bilateral ties and play an active role in safeguarding peace and stability as well as deepening cooperation within the region.

Available at:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-10/06/c_13543640.htm


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2.
South Korea: North Korea's Nuclear Threat 'Dangerous'
Sangwon Yoon
Associated Press
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


The threat posed by North Korea's nuclear program has reached an "extremely dangerous level," an adviser to South Korea's president said in comments published Wednesday.

It was not clear whether the comments by Kim Tae-hyo, President Lee Myung-bak's deputy national security adviser, were based on new intelligence.

They followed a report last week by the Washington-based Institute for Science and International Security that satellite images from Sept. 29 showed new construction activity in the area surrounding North Korea's nuclear reactor.

Kim's comments were reported Wednesday in the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper. Kim confirmed to The Associated Press that he made the comments Tuesday at a forum on Northeast Asia, but declined to elaborate.

"The North Korean nuclear threat has, in reality, been accelerating and has now reached an extremely dangerous level," Kim said.

North Korea, which has active nuclear and missile programs, conducted underground atomic tests in 2006 and 2009, drawing tough international sanctions in response.

South Korea, along with the United States, China, Japan and Russia, have been negotiating with the impoverished country since 2003 to get it to dismantle its nuclear facilities, which they consider a threat to regional security.

North Korea, however, pulled out of the talks last year amid an international row over its firing of a suspected long-range missile that the North said was a satellite launch.

"Should North Korea reduce the size of nuclear warheads and use them in actual battle, regardless of their accuracy, they will cause an unbelievable amount of damage," Kim said.

Most security experts think North Korea remains unable to deliver a nuclear warhead on a missile, but it is believed to be trying to develop this capability and some observers think it may have come close already.

"Although the North Koreans carried out two nuclear tests, analysts in the West doubt that they have successfully loaded warheads onto missiles," said Kim Tae-woo, a senior research fellow at the state-run Korea Institute for Defense Analysis in Seoul. "But I can say with certainty that they are extremely close. They might have done so already."

Presidential adviser Kim said that the North is operating not only its plutonium-producing Yongbyon nuclear facility, but also highly enriched uranium activities elsewhere in the country.

He also suggested that there is potential danger in the emergence of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's youngest son, Kim Jong Un, as his heir apparent. The younger Kim made his public debut last week after being promoted to four-star general and vice chairman of the ruling Workers' Party of Korea's Central Military Commission.

He said Kim was 26 years old and was born on Jan. 8, 1984.

"Kim is young and lacks experience, so there is a chance that he might develop an appetite for yet another risk or be tempted to engage in provocation to prove himself to the outside world," the presidential adviser said.

Little is known about Kim Jong Un. For the first time, state media reported Tuesday on him observing military exercises with his father.

Under a 2007 deal, North Korea agreed to disable its main nuclear complex in Yongbyon north of Pyongyang in return for 1 million tons of fuel oil and other concessions and in June 2008 blew up the cooling tower. But the disablement came to halt as the North wrangled with Washington over how to verify its past atomic activities.

The Institute for Science and International Security said the satellite images showed heavy construction and excavation equipment and trucks at the Yongbyon site and construction of two small buildings near the site of the destroyed cooling tower.

"It is unclear if the activity seen in this image represents preparation for construction of a new cooling tower or preparation for construction of other buildings or structures for some other purpose," ISIS said.

North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Pak Kil Yon vowed at the United Nations last week that the North would strengthen its nuclear capability in response to what he described as hostile moves by the United States.

North Korea is believed to have enough weaponized plutonium for at least a half dozen atomic bombs.

The North's plutonium was extracted over a number of years from spent fuel rods from its Yongbyon reactor.

In Tokyo, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell called for "clear signs from the North Koreans that they are prepared to take the steps that they've committed themselves to in the past" regarding denuclearization. He spoke to reporters in Tokyo before leaving for South Korea, where he was to meet officials Thursday.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iURO8fOyWVOA0ytFlaAGuC9F7R9wD9IM5BVO0?docId=D9IM5BVO0


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3.
ASEM Leaders Urge North Korea to Abandon Nukes, Halt Military Provocation
Lee Chi-dong
Yonhap News Agency
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Asian and European leaders called Tuesday for North Korea to dismantle its nuclear program in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner and expressed deep concern over the March 26 sinking of a South Korean warship, an attack that Seoul blames on its communist neighbor.

"Leaders urged all parties to fulfill their commitments under the Joint Statement of 19 September 2005 and under relevant UN Security Council resolutions, which provide the framework for the DPRK (North Korea) to abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs in a complete verifiable and irreversible manner," read the chairman's statement issued at the end of a two-day session of the Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM).

The 20-page document called for the two Koreas, the U.S., China, Russia, and Japan to pave the way for the resumption of the long-stalled six-way nuclear talks.

Touching on the issue of the sunken South Korean naval ship Cheonan, the leaders "stressed the importance of preventing further such attacks." But they did not directly mention North Korea, which denies any role.

They also "took note of the recent steps undertaken in inter-Korean relations, including the discussion of family reunions, and encouraged the resumption of such family reunions on a regular basis."

The two Koreas agreed to resume the emotionally charged gatherings late this month, spurred by Seoul's decision to deliver rice and other emergency aid to the North, battered by recent floods.

The leaders also hailed South Korea's initiative to fight climate change.

"In this context, leaders noted the establishment of the Global Green Growth Institute in Seoul, Korea, in June 2010, to support green growth in developing countries," the document read.

They emphasized that the reforms undertaken in response to the global economic crisis constitute an opportunity to lay the foundation for a more sustainable model of development.

"We pledge to strengthen the sources of growth and to conduct structural reforms, moving away from the patterns that created fragilities in the pre-crisis period, including excessive public deficits, non-sustainable debts and development gaps," they said.

In a separate document, the Brussels Declaration, they expressed support for implementing the International Monetary Fund (IMF) quota reform by the G-20 summit in Seoul in November "to adequately reflect the relative weight and responsibilities of the IMF members in the world economy."

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/2010/10/06/13/0401000000AEN20101006000100315F.HTML


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4.
North Korea Likely to Bolster Nuclear Activity
Kang Hyun-kyung
The Korea Times
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


With the prospects of a dynastic power transfer from father to son in North Korea growing, lawmakers expressed worries over the Stalinist state’s nuclear ambitions, Tuesday.

The pessimistic view about the reclusive country was bipartisan, and comes at a time when the two Koreas are set to hold a reunion of separated family members later this month.

Legislators warned against hasty optimism over the prospects for inter-Korean relations.

Calling the current reciprocity-based approach an old tactic that will end in failure, they urged the Ministry of Unification to rewrite its North Korea policy to better handle the communist state after Kim Jong-il’s third son Jong-un takes power.

After Jong-un assumed key party posts in last week’s rare Workers’ Party conference, Rep. Won Hye-young of the main opposition Democratic Party (DP) predicted that the North could bolster its nuclear program, rather than give it up.

“Given that the North announced plans to strengthen its program, I suspect that it will assert that it is a nuclear weapons state and call on the rest of the world to accept its status,” the liberal party lawmaker said during the National Assembly’s annual inspection of the unification ministry.

“President Lee Myung-bak reiterated that the government would give economic incentives to the North in return for the latter’s commitment to give up its nuclear ambitions,” he added, calling on the ministry to chart a new strategy to better handle the North.

Unification Minister Hyun In-taek told lawmakers that the government has been reviewing a variety of options to better cope with the North by keeping all options open.

Growing worries over North Korea after the conference were also apparent among governing Grand National Party (GNP) lawmakers.

Rep. Hwang Jin-ha forecast that the North’s military-first stance would more likely continue and the long-term prospects for inter-Korean relations could go from bad to worse.

“During the conference, Pyongyang made it clear that its primary goal was to build a prosperous and strong state based on its self-reliance principle,” Hwang said.

Their concerns came days after the Washington-based Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) detected unusual signs near the North’s Yongbyon nuclear site.

The think tank presented a new commercial satellite image ― which it obtained from DigitalGlobe ― of the nuclear site that shows new construction or excavation activity in the area surrounding the destroyed cooling tower for the 5-megawatt nuclear reactor.

ISIS added there was no indication in the image that North Korea was rebuilding the cooling tower there as the activity appeared to be more extensive than would be expected for that.

Available at:
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/10/113_74007.html


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5.
North Korea Restores Facilities at Nuclear Reactor
AFP
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


North Korea is restoring facilities at its Yongbyon nuclear reactor, the source of weapons-grade plutonium in the past, South Korea's defence ministry said Tuesday.

"North Korea is restoring nuclear facilities and continuing maintenance activities at Yongbyon," a spokesman quoted Defence Minister Kim Tae-Young as telling parliament on Monday. "It is engaged in new construction and large-scale excavation."

The foreign ministry said the South is closely monitoring the work.

"There are some activities going on but we have no information on what these are for," said spokesman Kim Young-Sun. "The government is watching closely the activities there and exchanging information with other countries."

An unidentified government official was quoted by Dong-A Ilbo newspaper as saying that two rectangular buildings were being built next to the site of a cooling tower demolished in 2008.

A private US research institute reported last week that new construction or excavation was under way at Yongbyon.

The Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) said tracks made by heavy machinery along with construction or excavation equipment were visible in satellite photos.

ISIS said there appeared to be ongoing construction of two small buildings next to the former tower, which the North blew up in June 2008 in front of foreign media to dramatise its commitment to nuclear disarmament.

The institute said the purpose of the work is unclear but bears watching.

The North's current plutonium stockpile is believed to be enough for six to eight bombs.

North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Pak Kil-Yon told the United Nations last week his country must strengthen its nuclear deterrent in the face of what he called threats from the United States.

The North shut down Yongbyon in July 2007 under a six-nation aid-for-disarmament accord. The following summer it destroyed the tower.

But six-party talks became bogged down in December 2008 over ways to verify the North's denuclearisation. In April 2009 Pyongyang abandoned the talks and said it had resumed reprocessing spent fuel rods to make plutonium.

In May 2009 it conducted an atomic weapons test, its second.

The North has indicated willingness in principle to return to the six-party forum chaired by its ally China. But it says it wants separate talks with the United States about signing a permanent peace treaty on the peninsula.

South Korea and the United States, which accuse the North of a deadly March attack on a South Korean warship, have responded warily. Japan and Russia are also members of the forum.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5i3h-ZSk1M2JL_-fRmjfTenjzrXGg?docId=CNG.5d927e0c27bf5fe027cd219d736bad4e.731


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C.  Nonproliferation

1.
Pakistan Steps Up Nuclear Construction
AFP
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Pakistan appears to have stepped up construction of a new atomic reactor that could help the country produce easier-to-deliver nuclear weapons, a US research institute said Tuesday.

Pakistan's nuclear arsenal is a highly sensitive topic for the United States as it tries to improve relations with its frontline partner in the campaign against Islamic extremism.

The Institute for Science and International Security, a private US group which is critical of nuclear weapons, said it observed progress at Pakistan's tightly guarded Khushab site which is key to plutonium production.

In a September satellite image of the site in Punjab province, the institute said it observed a completed row of mechanical draft cooling towers at a third reactor, where construction began in 2006.

It marks a faster pace than for the second reactor, where such towers appeared after six years of construction, it said.

"Based on what I see in the image, it wouldn't surprise me if they started it up in 2011," said Paul Brannan, a senior analyst at the institute.

The institute noticed steam from the second reactor in a December 31 image, indicating it was running. It did not see steam in the latest image, but said reactors were not operated continuously during early phases and that weather conditions may have reduced visibility.

Pakistan declared itself a nuclear weapons state in 1998, days after its historic rival India carried out similar atom bomb tests. Pakistan's nuclear arsenal originally was based on highly enriched uranium.

Western analysts believe that China assisted Pakistan is developing Khushab nuclear site to produce plutonium, which can be miniaturized for cruise missiles presumably aimed at India.

"Plutonium bombs give the ability to make smaller, lighter or more powerful weapons, and also more deliverable weapons, and I suspect that's what Pakistan wants," Brannan said.

Pakistan has been adamant that its nuclear weapons are in safe hands and President Barack Obama has publicly concurred, although US officials are said to have drafted a contingency plan in a worst-case scenario.

Available at:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20101005/wl_sthasia_afp/uspakistannuclearweapons_20101005214223


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D.  Nuclear Cooperation

1.
Germany to End 'Nuclear Sharing' with US
The Local
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Germany has moved a step closer to ridding its soil of atomic weapons, bowing out of the “nuclear sharing” agreement under which its fighter jets can be used to drop US bombs, media reported on Wednesday.

The federal government plans to end the deal by 2013 and perhaps earlier, when it decommissions its ageing Tornado fighter jets, which are equipped to drop the nuclear bombs, the Rheinische Post reported.

At present, the Tornado fighters, stationed at the Bundeswehr base at Büchel in the Mosel region, are ready to drop the estimated 22 American-owned nuclear bombs stored on German soil. Those bombs are housed at the the Büchel base, guarded by US soldiers.
But the Tornado jets are due to be decommissioned and the Rheinische Post reported that Germany would not continue the so-called NATO “nuclear sharing” agreement.

While the change is being driven primarily by budget cuts, it also takes Germany a step closer to getting rid of the remaining nuclear weapons on its soil – a fervent goal of Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle’s.

But Germany's move is likely to spark a row within NATO, which wants to continue with the policy of nuclear deterrence, the paper reported.

The bombs in Büchel are the last nuclear weapons on German soil, according to the report. While authorities will not confirm their number, it is believed to be 22.

The Tornado squadron was supposed to be replaced by the new Eurofighter. But the new jet would have needed to be redesigned to be capable of carrying the nuclear weapons. Because of the recent tough budget cuts in defence and other areas of government spending, it was decided that the “nuclear sharing” squadron be abandoned altogether.

Available at:
http://www.thelocal.de/national/20101006-30289.html


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2.
Korea, Turkey to Discuss Nuclear Industry Cooperation
The Korea Herald
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Officials from Seoul and Ankara will hold talks this week to discuss Korea’s participation in the construction of a nuclear reactor in Turkey, the Ministry of Knowledge Economy said.

The two-day meeting, beginning Wednesday in Ankara, will follow up a bilateral pact on their broad cooperation in nuclear energy, signed during the Turkish President Abdullah Gul’s visit here in June.

“The two sides exchanged drafts for the negotiation agenda around late last month. The intergovernmental talks will include basic aspects of the project like location, size and business type, and how they will collaborate to carry it out,” the ministry said.

Ministry officials said a joint task force between the two countries has completed a study on the prospective plants’ feasibility and detailed construction plans. The team was formed soon after Korea Electric Power Corporation and the state-run Turkish energy firm signed a cooperation deal in March.

Turkey is planning to build four nuclear reactors in its Black Sea coastal areas. Each project is estimated to be worth $5 billion.

Available at:
http://www.koreaherald.com/business/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20101006000763


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E.  Nuclear Energy

1.
Bushehr Reactor Gets Fuel Load in October
PressTV
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Russian contractor of Bushehr nuclear power plant has confirmed that Iran will begin loading fuel into the nuclear power station later in October.

A spokeswoman of the Atomstroyexport company told RIA Novosti on Tuesday that the entire load of fuel has been delivered to the rector repository.

"The loading of the fuel into the reactor is scheduled for October 2010," Olga Tysleva said.

Atomstroyexport is the Russian Federation's nuclear power equipment and service export monopoly.

Meanwhile, head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), Ali Akbar Salehi, says the Bushehr power plant is expected to start generating electricity by late December.

AEOI chairman said on Tuesday, “The start-up process of the Bushehr power plant is progressing well and we hope to see it connected to the national electricity grid by late December, or a few weeks earlier.”

About the delay in the fuel injection process, Salehi said, “During the Bushehr power plant's washing process, a leak was discovered at the side pool of the reactor and it was plugged. This leakage postponed the activities of the plant for a few days.”

He reiterated that the nuclear plant is in proper condition and dismissed as false speculations that the Stuxnet virus was the cause of the delay of the reactor.

The construction of the Bushehr plant started in 1975 when Germany signed a contract with Iran. Germany however, pulled out of the project following the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Iran then signed a deal with Russia in 1995, under which the plant was originally scheduled to be completed in 1999 but completion of the project has been repeatedly delayed.

The reactor was launched in August amid a standoff with the US and its allies over allegations that the country is following a military nuclear program.

Iranian officials say Tehran seeks to use the peaceful applications of nuclear energy for electricity production and medical research, dismissing the Western charges.

Iran is a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and thus has the right to enrich uranium to produce fuel.

On June 9, the UN Security Council passed a resolution imposing new sanctions on Iran over its nuclear program. The United States and the EU later imposed extra sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

Russia says the Bushehr facility will not be affected by the sanctions.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/145412.html


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2.
NAM Wants Access to Nuclear Material and Technology
Lilian Budianto
The Jakarta Post
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


Indonesia, representing the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), has voiced concerns over restrictions of access to nuclear materials and technology for civilian use, during a UN meeting in New York, saying that developing countries should be granted the same right to nuclear use as developed nations.

The UN’s First Committee meeting, which addresses nuclear disarmament and international security issues, started its month-long meeting on Monday.

In a speech on behalf of NAM during the committee’s opening session, Indonesia’s permanent representative to the UN in New York, Hasan Kleib, said that the non-proliferation agenda and security issues did not justify restricting developing nations’ access to nuclear material and technology.

“The Movement continues to note with concern that undue restrictions on exports to developing countries of material, equipment and technology, for peaceful purposes persist,” said Hasan in his speech made available to the media.

Hasan said the restriction had been imposed because of nuclear proliferation concerns voiced by nuclear nations regardless of the fact that all signatories to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) were entitled to use nuclear technology for peaceful purpose.

“NAM emphasizes that proliferation concerns are best addressed through multilaterally negotiated, universal, comprehensive and non-discriminatory agreements.

“Non-proliferation control arrangements should be transparent and open to participation by all states, and should ensure that they do not impose restrictions on access to material, equipment and technology for peaceful purposes required by developing countries for their continued development.”

Hasan said that while developing nations were having difficulties gaining access to nuclear materials and technology, the nuclear weapon states were not yet fully committed to disarmament.

The recently held five-yearly Non- Proliferation Treaty summit in New York came short of setting a deadline for total disarmament, owing to a lack of commitment by nuclear states.

Hasan said NAM had urged for the start of negotiations on total nuclear disarmament by 2025, citing a lack of concrete steps toward disarmament.

Indonesia has led the NAM in its disarmament agenda and has voiced concerns that the nuclear disarmament agenda had been sidelined by non-proliferation issues, in particular over the West suspicions that Tehran has secretly developed its own nuclear weapon.

The US conducted its own nuclear summit in Washington in April that addresses security at nuclear facilities but did not touch on disarmament.

The US summit was contested with another summit in Iran that highlighted the need for immediate disarmament. Hasan said NAM would like to ensure that NPT signatories committed to the three pillars of NPT and not only prioritized their own agenda.

Indonesia has supported Iran to develop its own civilian nuclear facilities but also calls for Tehran to fully cooperate with the UN nuclear watchdog agency.

Available at:
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/10/06/nam-wants-access-nuclear-material-and-technology.html


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3.
Nuclear Power Plants Can Meet Mideast’s Needs: Expert
Ramesh Mathew
Gulf Times
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)


The less-populated countries in the Middle East should explore the possibility of setting up nuclear power plants to meet their needs, a senior official of a major Canadian company said yesterday.

Michael H Chatlani, vice-president of Qubec-based L3 MAPPS, which specialises in providing simulation solutions for power plants, feels nuclear power plants would be more cost-effective in the long run as maintenance costs are less compared to power plants run on other fuels and gas.

Chatlani is in Doha attending the ongoing 9th Power Gen Middle East Exhibition & Conference at Doha Exhibition Centre.

“Initial costs of setting up a nuclear power plant are enormous. However, when its utility reaches its pinnacle, costs come down heavily,” said Chatlani.

The Canadian official feels that the operations of nuclear power plants would be more effective and economical owing to somewhat steady fuel costs.

“Another major advantage is that there is no scope for greenhouse gas emission in nuclear plants. Our experience over the years has found that there’s hardly any environmental damage to those places where proper simulation technologies are in place,” said Chatlani.

Among the advantages of nuclear power is its better production capacity. While one unit of thermal or gas could produce between 600mw and 800mw, the same quantity of nuclear power could generate as much as 1,500mw or more electricity, he said.

With the setting up of nuclear plants, a gas-rich country like Qatar could concentrate on exporting its main energy source and thus enhance its national income, feels the Canadian official.

“We are pleased to learn that more countries of the region are currently exploring the possibility of setting up nuclear power plants to meet their requirements. Qatar, we are told, is in the middle of an elaborate viability and feasibility study on the issue,” he said. UAE has already given a go-ahead to the proposal, added the official.

Chatlani’s company supplied simulators to Ras Abu Fontas plant a few years ago and has been in touch with the country’s energy sector on a regular basis.

Asked about the negative aspects of nuclear reactors, the Canadian expert felt the world has learnt a lesson from such experiences as Chernobyl and utmost care is being taken since then at well-planned, better simulated nuclear power plants located in different countries.

A recipient of a number of global accolades, the Canadian company has also set up a major manufacturing division in Bangalore, India’s Silicon city, where it employs nearly 5,000 professionals.

Available at:
http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=390334&version=1&template_id=36&parent_id=16


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4.
No State Subsidies for New Nuclear Plants, Sweden PM Says
Reuters
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)


Sweden will not give any state subsidies for building new nuclear power plants after parliament this year ended a 30-year moratorium on the construction of new ones, the prime minister said on Tuesday.

Sweden in June voted to allow the building of new nuclear power plants at existing facilities from 2011 to replace an ageing 10 reactors.

Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt said at the opening of parliament that though no subsidies for new plants would be given, nuclear would remain an important part of power production.

Available at:
http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKSAT00882320101005


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F.  Links of Interest

1.
A Look at North Korea's Nuclear Arms Programme
Reuters
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6951QF20101006


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2.
U.A.E. Cuts Off Ties to Iran Banks
Chip Cummins and Jay Solomon
The Wall Street Journal
10/6/2010
(for personal use only)
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703298504575534041013995702.html


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3.
UN Hosts Nuke Abolition Exhibition in Vienna
Ramesh Jaura
In Depth News
10/5/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.indepthnews.net/news/news.php?key1=2010-10-05%2019:01:53&key2=1


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