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Nuclear News - 10/14/2010
PGS Nuclear News, October 14, 2010
Compiled By: Matthew Kapuscinski


A.  Iran
    1. Iran Blames US for Giving Israel Nukes, PressTV (10/13/2010)
    2. Iran Blames EU's Ashton for Nuclear Talks Deadlock, AFP (10/12/2010)
    3. Iran Spies Claim Signals Nuclear Problems, UPI (10/12/2010)
    4. Iran Urges West to be 'Serious' on Talks, PressTV (10/12/2010)
    5. Iranian Group Says it Has Nuke Details, UPI (10/12/2010)
    6. Iran Open to Talks Based on Respect, PressTV (10/12/2010)
B.  DPRK
    1. North Korea Positive on Returning to 6-Party Talks, Kim Se-jeong, The Korea Times (10/13/2010)
    2. Russia Wants No Nukes in North Korea, UPI (10/12/2010)
    3. Senior North Korean Diplomat Visits Beijing for Talks with Chinese Nuclear Envoy: Source, Yonhap News Agency (10/12/2010)
C.  India
    1. Government Rules Out Any Amendments in Civil Nuclear Law, The Hindu (10/13/2010)
    2. Regulating Various Nuclear Reactors in India a Challenge, Sify News (10/12/2010)
D.  Nuclear Cooperation
    1. Kan Vows to Provide Support for Jordan to Build Nuclear Power Plant, The Mainichi Daily News (10/13/2010)
    2. Korea, Kazakhstan to Cooperate on Energy, Resources, The Korea Herald (10/13/2010)
    3. Lukashenka Approves Draft Agreement with Russia on Nuclear Fuel Transfer and Exchange, Naviny (10/12/2010)
E.  Nuclear Energy
    1. U.S. Announces Repatriation of Spent Fuel, UPI (10/13/2010)
    2. Bushehr Nuclear Plant to Receive Additional Russian Staff, RIA Novosti (10/13/2010)
F.  Links of Interest
    1. U.N. Nuclear Agency Faces Dilemma Over Syria, Fredrik Dahl, Reuters (10/13/2010)
    2. Russia Loses Money, Reputation Over S-300 Sale Ban - Expert, RIA Novosti (10/12/2010)



A.  Iran

1.
Iran Blames US for Giving Israel Nukes
PressTV
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran's Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi has blamed the US for providing Israel with nuclear weapons, saying that Americans owe the world public opinion a response on the matter.

"US officials should provide the global public opinion with an explanation about arming the Zionist regime," said Vahidi upon his arrival in Tehran on Tuesday following a two-day visit to Azerbaijan.

"Issues with the Israeli regime will not be resolved through the purchase of weapons since the regime has problems with its core nature which are rooted in its illegitimacy," he added.

General Vahidi went on to say that this issue, along with internal differences over the future of Tel Aviv, have led Israel to adopt mostly propaganda and publicity measures to cover-up its problems and weaknesses.

He said Israel is purchasing new US jet fighters to "cover-up" its failures in wars against Gaza and Lebanon.

The Iranian defense minister also dismissed propaganda campaigns that Iran's domestic production of defensive weapons threatens its neighbors.

"We have always announced that we are ready to offer our products in defense industry to all neighboring Muslim countries and regard ourselves as protector of security in the whole region," he said.

General Vahidi reiterated that efforts by the arrogant establishment are within the framework of Isamophobia, Iranophobia and Shiaphobia, adding, "This is while Islam and Shia have always interacted from a position of friendship and kindness."

The Iranian minister arrived in the Azeri capital of Baku on Monday at the head of a delegation.

While in Baku, General Vahidi held talks with his Azeri counterpart Safar Abiyev, President Ilham Aliyev, Foreign Minister Elmar Mamedyarov and Defence Industry Minister Yavar Jamalov and visited units producing military hardware.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/146518.html


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2.
Iran Blames EU's Ashton for Nuclear Talks Deadlock
AFP
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran on Tuesday blamed European Union Foreign Affairs chief Catherine Ashton for the deadlock over nuclear talks with world powers, urging her to be "more active" in pursuing the dialogue.

"Basically, it seems that the volume of Ms. Ashton's activity is lower," foreign ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast told reporters, targeting Ashton for the stalemate in talks over Tehran's controversial nuclear programme.

Ashton represents the six world powers -- the United States, Britain, China, France, Russia and Germany -- in negotiations with Iran.

Dialogue between Iran and the six powers has been stalled since October 2009, when the two groups last met in Geneva.

The negotiations aim to address international suspicions that Iran is seeking to develop atomic weapons under the guise of a civilian nuclear programme, a charge Tehran vehemently denies.

On Saturday, Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki said Tehran considered late October or early November as an appropriate time for a resumption of the talks but a spokesman for Ashton said no date had been set.

"Mrs. Ashton is still ready to talk to Iran and is hopeful that this will be possible," spokesman Darren Ennis told AFP in response to Mottaki's remarks.

Mehmanparast directly blamed Ashton for the stalemate.

"If she is really eager for negotiations, she should be more active," he insisted, adding that her predecessor Javier Solana was "more active."

"We have announced our readiness for negotiations. But the other side ... is not really following up, or is not serious" about resuming the dialogue, he said.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had declared a unilateral ban on talks until the middle of September after the Islamic republic was hit with new sanctions by UN Security Council on June 9.

Iranian officials have regularly insisted that during any talks Tehran will reiterate that its nuclear rights be recognised.

Available at:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iF6NeJ79mk65lTa6nWcbGhXfX3EQ?docId=CNG.5d2911d7ca005a0565768682abe5da9e.241


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3.
Iran Open to Talks Based on Respect
PressTV
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran has rejected the West's threatening language along its carrot and stick approach toward the Islamic Republic's nuclear program, saying it is open to talks based on mutual respect.

Iranian Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani, who was speaking at a news conference in the Kazakh capital of Astana on Monday, said that the basis of talks regarding Iran's nuclear issue should change.

“The basis of talks over Iran's nuclear issue should change. The West should respect Asian countries and not threaten them. If talks are founded on this basis, Iran is always ready for talks,” he said when asked about Tehran's readiness for nuclear talks with the West.

Larijani went on to say that the US was making a political tool of negotiations with Iran, adding that the West's carrot and stick policy was no longer acceptable.

The Iranian senior official also called for close interaction among regional countries.

He said that regional countries have the potential to solve their own issues, reiterating that they do not need foreign forces to interfere in the region.

Larijani said that Tehran and Astana could play an important role in establishing peace and security in the region and called for closer interaction between the two countries.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/146324.html


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4.
Iran Spies Claim Signals Nuclear Problems
UPI
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran has publicly acknowledged Western intelligence services have infiltrated its nuclear program but reports the project has suffered a series of technical setbacks lately suggest Western sabotage has taken a toll.

The disclosure Sunday by Ali Akbar Salehi, head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, followed the reported arrest of several alleged spies by Iranian authorities and a mysterious attack by a computer worm that caused havoc with computerized industrial equipment in Iran, reportedly including the Bushehr nuclear plant.

Salehi's remarkable admission, reported by the semiofficial Fars news agency, was a stark confirmation that Iran has been wrestling with a sustained intelligence assault on its contentious nuclear program.

The recent nuclear reverses suffered by Iran apparently have centered largely on its ability to enrich uranium, a vital process that produces weapons grade material.

In May 2009, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.N. watchdog, reported that Iran had 4,920 operational centrifuges which enrich the uranium. A year later, the agency said the number had fallen to 3,936, a 20 percent drop.

U.S., British and Israeli intelligence services have reportedly been waging a covert campaign to sabotage and disrupt Iran's nuclear program for several years. Alleged sabotage operations include explosions that wrecked the power supply at the enrichment center at Natanz in central Iran in 2006. Fifty centrifuges were lost and the head of Iran's nuclear agency, Gholam Reza Aghazadeh, said the equipment had been "manipulated."

Intelligence sources claim the CIA and its friends also plant faulty equipment in Iran's clandestine procurement pipeline.

In June 2008, an Iranian businessman was sentenced to death in Tehran for supplying defective equipment to the nuclear program. No details were disclosed but one official conceded immense damage had been caused.

In this, the intelligence services have been aided by the fact that Iran has to acquire most of its nuclear equipment abroad and use unscrupulous middle men to help it circumvent international sanctions.

"Western suppliers are critical," observed David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security in Washington.

The Americans and their allies "all want to get companies to help them put bogus equipment into the program" that will break down later, he said.

The Financial Times reported in July that Iran "also appears to be having difficulties on other fronts." It quoted Ivan Oelrich of the Federation of American Scientists as saying the Iranian centrifuges were only working at 20 percent of efficiency.

The International Atomic Energy Agency reported recently that 4,592 centrifuges had been installed at the Natanz center but were all idle.

While it's alleged the Americans and their friends have been actively seeking to subvert the Iranian program, either through sabotage or luring Iranian scientists into defecting, Western scientists say Iranian incompetence could be behind some of the setbacks.

Iran is still using old centrifuges, largely models known as P1 and P2, which were designed by Pakistan for its clandestine nuclear arms program more than two decades ago.

"It's hardly surprising when these break down, especially given the regime's ambitions for speedy success," said Michael Adler, an expert on Iran's nuclear program at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington.

Iran had adamantly denied its nuclear project was being sabotaged. But Salehi's admission Western agents had been able to penetrate the program indicated Tehran was having to grapple with a major security problem.

Salehi said the West had intensified its drive "to establish contact with experts" at his agency and "lure them with promises of further study and better jobs abroad."

He claimed his security department had successfully countered these Western operations by tightening security procedures and improving privileges for nuclear scientists so they wouldn't be tempted to defect.

Access to information on "foreign purchases and commercial affairs" has been blocked and "the possibility of information leaking is almost impossible now," he declared.

One of the Iranian defectors was nuclear physicist Shahram Amiri, who reportedly fled while on a Muslim pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia in May. He apparently changed his mind and was returned to Iran in July claiming he had been abducted in a Saudi-CIA operation.

There has been speculation the Iranians planted him to learn what the Americans knew about the nuclear program.

Available at:
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/Special/2010/10/12/Iran-spies-claim-signals-nuclear-problems/UPI-74711286907819/


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5.
Iran Urges West to be 'Serious' on Talks
PressTV
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


Iran insists that it has frequently announced readiness for nuclear talks, saying it is expecting the Western side to take a “serious” step towards the resumption of negotiations.

“We have agreed in principle to talks and we have expressed our readiness. It seems the other party is not so serious,” Iranian Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said at his weekly press conference on Tuesday.

He said that Iran had put forward a proposal to hold ministerial-level talks with the P5+1 on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in New York, but the other side seemed to be not ready for any negotiations.

The spokesperson added that even the country's Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki suggested timing for negotiations with the P5+1 between late October and early November.

Now is the time for the other side to show an earnest desire for talks, Mehmanparast went on to say.

He said that Iran is willing to hold talks with the Vienna Group, consisting of the US, France, Russia and the IAEA, within the framework of the May 17 fuel swap declaration.

Iran signed a declaration with Turkey and Brazil on May 17 based on which Tehran agreed to exchange 1,200 kg of its low-enriched uranium on Turkish soil with 20 percent-enriched nuclear fuel.

He added that the Islamic Republic was also ready for talks with the P5+1 -- the US, UK, Russia, china and Germany -- based on Tehran's package of proposals or at least the commonalities of the packages put forward by both sides.

In 2009, Iran presented a package of proposals titled “Cooperation for Peace, Justice, and Progress” to the group of P5+1, which included proposals for talks for the establishment of peace and stability among the international community.

Available at:
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/146357.html


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6.
Iranian Group Says it Has Nuke Details
UPI
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


A resistance movement in Iran threatens to publish details of Iran's nuclear activities if the government fails to release 200 of its members, an official said.

Abdel Raouf Rigi, a spokesman for the Jundallah rebel organization, told Asharq-al-Awsat members of his group had kidnapped an Iranian nuclear official in the city of Isfahan who had revealed Iran's efforts to obtain a nuclear bomb.

He said that the kidnapped man was a senior official in the Iranian nuclear program, named Amir Hussein Sherani bin Mohammad Sherani, born in 1971 and carrying identity card No. 2428.

In the telephone interview with the newspaper, Rigi said Sherani was being held under heavy guard in the mountains. Rigi said his organization would publish the details if the Iranian government fails to release 200 members of his group who were detained by Iranian security forces.

Ali Abd al-Alahi, an aide to the Iran's minister of Internal Security Affairs, downplayed the significance of the kidnapping, the newspaper said, saying Sherani is merely a "construction welder" at the Isfahan uranium enrichment facility.

Jundallah literally means Soldiers of Allah and is also known as the People's Resistance Movement of Iran, which says it is fighting for the rights of the Sunni Muslims in Iran.

Available at:
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2010/10/12/Iranian-group-says-it-has-nuke-details/UPI-70281286885444/


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B.  DPRK

1.
North Korea Positive on Returning to 6-Party Talks
Kim Se-jeong
The Korea Times
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


China’s vice foreign minister and chief negotiator at the six-party talks said North Korea is willing to return to the negotiating table.

After speaking with the North’s chief negotiator Kim Gye-gwan in Beijing, Tuesday, Wu Dawei told reporters that “North Korea is positive on returning to the talks,”but added he wasn’t sure when this would happen.

Kim, the North’s chief negotiator was recently promoted to first vice foreign minister in a political reshuffle in Pyongyang. It generated speculation that Ri Yong-ho, Kim’s deputy, might take over in negotiations aimed at denuclearizing North Korea. Kim has been serving as the top negotiator since February, 2007.

On his second day in Beijing, reports said Kim was likely to pay visits to key Chinese diplomats, including Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi and State Councilor Dai Bingguo, whose rank is equivalent to vice prime minister.

Pyongyang has repeated its willingness to return to the talks, while Seoul has been reluctant, demanding a formal apology for the sinking of South Korean Navy frigate Cheonan. In March, the ship was sunk following a torpedo attack, costing the lives of 46 sailors.

An international investigation led by the South came to the conclusion that a North Korean torpedo was to blame for the incident.

The North denies any involvement.

The nuclear talks, involving the two Koreas, China, Russia, Japan and the United States, have been on hold since Pyongyang boycotted them after the U.N. imposed sanctions on it following a second nuclear test.

Available at:
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/10/116_74518.html


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2.
Russia Wants No Nukes in North Korea
UPI
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


Russia's top nuclear envoy said Tuesday a common view is needed in order to convince North Korea to abandon its nuclear program.

Deputy Foreign Minister Alexei Borodavkin said members of the six-party talks "should work together toward an agreement in opinion" on denuclearizing North Korea and preventing the regime from conducting more nuclear tests, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported.

Borodavkin is visiting South Korea for three days of talks that began Monday.

He met with the South's new Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan, who said Seoul is willing to engage with North Korea if the North is sincere about wanting to end its nuclear program.

North Korea recently suggested it would return to the six-party talks after walking out in December 2008 to protest sanctions imposed by the United Nations.

Borodavkin said his country gave North Korea $100 million in aid in 2005 so it would commit to getting rid of its nuclear program.

"This should not happen again," he said.

Available at:
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2010/10/12/Russia-wants-no-nukes-in-North-Korea/UPI-91691286893317/


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3.
Senior North Korean Diplomat Visits Beijing for Talks with Chinese Nuclear Envoy: Source
Yonhap News Agency
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


A top North Korean diplomat and veteran nuclear negotiator arrived in Beijing Tuesday on a trip expected to include discussions on resuming international talks on Pyongyang's nuclear programs, a source here said.

It was the first time that First Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye-gwan has traveled to China since his promotion last month from vice foreign minister. For years, Kim served as Pyongyang's lead negotiator in Chinese-hosted, six-nation talks on the North's nuclear programs.

It is unclear whether Kim will remain in that post. There have been speculations that Ri Yong-ho, a seasoned diplomat who was promoted as vice foreign minister last month, will succeed Kim as Pyongyang's main six-party negotiator.

In Beijing, Kim is expected to meet with China's chief nuclear envoy Wu Dawei, the source said on condition of anonymity. Other high-level Chinese officials he could also meet include Vice Foreign Minister Wang Guangya, State Councilor Dai Bingguo and Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi.

The trip came as Pyongyang has been stepping up a campaign to pave the way for the youngest son of leader Kim Jong-il to inherit the communist nation. In late September, the son, Kim Jong-un, was named four-star general and given a powerful Workers' Party post.

On Sunday, the North staged a massive military parade seen as aimed at bolstering the standing of the heir-apparent. The junior Kim reviewed the parade from a leadership podium, along with his father, other members of the ruling elite and a senior Chinese Communist Party official, Zhou Yongkang.

In talks with leader Kim, the Chinese envoy conveyed the invitation of Chinese President Hu Jintao to Kim and the "new" North Korean leadership to visit China at a convenient time in the future.

The nuclear talks, involving the two Koreas, China, Japan, Russia and the United States, have been stalled since the last session in December 2008 due to a North Korean boycott. Prospects for reopening the process have diminished in the wake of March's sinking of a South Korean warship blamed on Pyongyang.

Pyongyang has indicated its willingness to return to the negotiating table in recent months, but Seoul and Washington have urged the North to take responsibility for the ship sinking and prove through action that it is serious about abandoning its nuclear weapons.

Available at:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/2010/10/12/5/0401000000AEN20101012008500315F.HTML


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C.  India

1.
Government Rules Out Any Amendments in Civil Nuclear Law
The Hindu
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


Government on Wednesday ruled out any amendments to the recently-enacted civil nuclear law to accommodate concerns of American companies on the issue of suppliers’ liability as a package during the coming visit of President Barack Obama to India next month.

“The question of amendments is never on the cards. We have explained to them (the US) the circumstances in which we had to go through (with) the bill and we have to work within the parameters of the legislation,” External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna said at a breakfast meeting with editors here.

He said they (the US) also know in a parliamentary system of democracy the bill becomes the law of the land and they also understand it because they work with the U.S. Congress where legislations are made.

The minister was replying to questions on whether the government was planning amendments to the Civil Nuclear Liabilities law, which fixes stiff liabilities on suppliers in case of accidents, enacted during the monsoon of Parliament as a package to Mr. Obama during the visit.

U.S. companies wanting to do business with India in the civil nuclear sector had expressed concerns over the provisions in the law.

Krishna said in the course of discussions with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during his recent visit India had provided them with “enough reasons” for enacting the legislation “so that they can understand the Indian position“.

He said the civil nuclear accord was done during President George W Bush’s time and the present Administration including Mr. Obama and Ms. Clinton were “very anxious” that the two countries continued to work as partners.

“This will come up for discussions between Obama and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh,” he said.

Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao, who was also present, said India has told the U.S. very clearly that it will create a level-playing field for all companies, including those from the US.

“We were able to clarify doubts about a couple of aspects in the Bill which will be discussed between the companies and the (government-owned) Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd.

“We are not talking of amendments to the Bill, certainly not. There is no question of amending the Bill. I don’t think you can try to conclude that we are trying to fix something outside the bill. The intention is to involve in discussions with them and not to amend the bill. It has been made clear to the US Administration,” she said.

On the visit itself, Krishna said bilateral, global and issues of the region will be discussed between the Prime Minister and President during visit which he described as one of the most important visits from India’s point of view.

He said during his visit to New York for the United Nations General Assembly session recently he had met Obama during a reception he (President) had hosted for the Foreign Ministers.

“He (Obama) told me he was indeed looking forward to the visit to India. I mentioned to him how India was also eagerly looking forward to the visit,” he said.

Krishna told the questioner that he cannot “quantify” the engagement between the two countries during the visit as it all depended on the number of issues including developments in the neighbourhood.

“We have a strategic partnership and hope this will get strengthened during the visit,” he said.

Available at:
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article828251.ece


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2.
Regulating Various Nuclear Reactors in India a Challenge
Sify News
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


The expansion of India's nuclear power sector with the setting up of mega sized reactors of differing technologies - light water, fast breeder and advanced heavy water - poses a challenge to the sector's regulator, a senior official said Tuesday.

'We have good experience and well-documented safety measures pertaining to pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR). The new challenge is from imported light water reactors and the domestically designed fast breeder and advanced heavy water reactors,' said R.I. Gujarathi, director, Nuclear Projects Safety in the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB).

Speaking on the challenges of atomic energy regulation in the changed Indian context at the Asian Nuclear Prospects (2010) a conference on nuclear energy in Asia, he said India is going to increase its atomic power capacity nearly ten-fold over the next ten years but the series of imported light water reactors will have to adhere to the current Indian regulations.

'The challenge is in the differences in standards and codes and their validation between the Indian equipments and that of imported ones,' Gujarathi said.

According to industry officials, it will be the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL) that will discuss with AERB on the safety aspects of the imported reactors in its capacity as the plant operator.

The AERB is looking at the feasibility of drafting technology neutral safety rules, Gujarathi said, adding the regulator will be doubling the head count to 400 during the 12th Five Year Plan period.

He said AERB is also planning to set up regional regulatory centres in south, east and north India to effectively monitor the growing number of diagnostic labs using radio nuclides - material used for diagnostic and treatment of ailments.

'We are also pursuing with the state governments to set up a directorate of radiation safety,' he added.

Available at:
http://sify.com/finance/regulating-various-nuclear-reactors-in-india-a-challenge-news-default-kkmukececie.html


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D.  Nuclear Cooperation

1.
Kan Vows to Provide Support for Jordan to Build Nuclear Power Plant
The Mainichi Daily News
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


Prime Minister Naoto Kan on Tuesday promised to offer "maximum support" for Jordan to build a nuclear power plant, the Foreign Ministry said.

During talks with Jordanian Prime Minister Samir Rifai in Tokyo, Kan said Japan will provide financial assistance to the Middle Eastern country's project to construct its first nuclear power plant by 2019 if the government can confirm its safety, the ministry said.

The two countries signed a civilian nuclear cooperation agreement last month, which will allow Japan to export its nuclear power generation technology and related equipment to Jordan.

Kan also told Rifai that Japan will consider offering new yen loans for some projects in Jordan, in addition to telling him that Tokyo wants to enhance cooperation with Amman on a range of global issues such as those related to U.N. Security Council reform and climate change.

Available at:
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20101013p2g00m0dm013000c.html


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2.
Korea, Kazakhstan to Cooperate on Energy, Resources
The Korea Herald
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


Korea and Kazakhstan will form a strategic partnership on energy and resources, the government said Wednesday.

The move comes as the Central Asian nation is seeking to build up to five nuclear power plants while Korea is in desperate search of rare earths whose demand is expected to rise in the next few years.

Minister of Knowledge Economy Choi Kyung-hwan met with Aset Issekeshev, Vice Prime Minister and Minister of Industry and New Technology of Kazakhstan, Tuesday during his visit to Astana and agreed to sign an inter-government agreement on co-establishing a coal-fired steam power plant in Balkhash.

In addition to the Balkhash Project, the two countries have also agreed to collaborate further in exploring new mines, uranium and other rare metals.

Kazakhstan has been showing interest in working with Korea regarding energy since its President Nursultan Nazarbayev visited Seoul in April.

President Lee Myung-bak and his Kazakh counterpart have discussed the possibility of joint projects to mine uranium and develop nuclear reactors at the time.

“The minister’s visit to the Central Asian country is meaningful in that it has elevated the level of the two nations’ strategic partnership from developing oil fields to resources, which will bring local firms more opportunities to operate there,” the ministry said.

Firms particularly in industries such as information technology and energy will benefit largely from the move, the ministry said.

The $380 million-Balhash project is the largest one that the two nations have collaborated on so far, for which 70-80 percent of the financing will be managed locally.

The IGA, in that sense, is expected to make the process much easier for the Korean consortium led by Korea Electric Power Corp. and Samsung C&T Corp., the ministry said.

Construction for the plant will begin in 2011 and is projected to be completed in 2016 for commercial operation.

Alongside the minister-level meeting, an economic mission of 50 held a business forum in Astana where members discussed ways for which firms from the two countries can cooperate further in new technologies and construction.

Available at:
http://www.koreaherald.com/business/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20101013000848


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3.
Lukashenka Approves Draft Agreement with Russia on Nuclear Fuel Transfer and Exchange
Naviny
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)


Alyaksandr Lukashenka, by his October 8 presidential edict, has approved a draft interstate agreement on the transfer of nuclear fuel to Russia and its exchange.

Under the agreement, Belarus would ship irradiated and fresh highly enriched nuclear fuel to Russia, while Russia would supply Belarus with fresh low enriched fuel, BelaPAN said.

On October 8, Mr. Lukashenka also signed an edict that would govern technical assistance to be provided by the US government in the transportation of nuclear fuel and its exchange.

The US government will help Belarus ship its spent nuclear fuel from the Sosny nuclear research center near Minsk to the Russia and exchange fresh nuclear fuel generated by the center’s mobile nuclear station called Pamir-630D for fresh fuel for its mini nuclear reactor.

Available at:
http://naviny.by/rubrics/english/2010/10/12/ic_news_259_353563/


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E.  Nuclear Energy

1.
Bushehr Nuclear Plant to Receive Additional Russian Staff
RIA Novosti
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


The number of Russian specialists working at the construction of the Bushehr nuclear plant in Iran will be increased by 100 in the near future, the ISNA news agency reported on Wednesday.

The agency cited Bushehr project manager Mahmoud Jafari as saying there were a total of 2,500 Russian employees working on the ambitious project.

The Iranian official said the Bushehr nuclear facility was undergoing a number of final tests prior to the loading of nuclear fuel into the reactor.

The Bushehr project is being implemented with Russia's assistance under the full supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Under a bilateral agreement, which has received IAEA approval, Russia will initially operate the plant, supplying its fuel and taking away all the spent fuel for the next two or three years, but will eventually hand over full control to Iran.

Available at:
http://en.rian.ru/world/20101013/160941091.html


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2.
U.S. Announces Repatriation of Spent Fuel
UPI
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)


The United States has helped remove more than 1,000 pounds of highly enriched uranium spent fuel from Poland, officials announced Tuesday.

The National Nuclear Security Administration said the spent fuel was returned to Russia during the past year. One of the five shipments was the largest ever of highly enriched uranium and the total amount, enough to make 18 nuclear weapons, was the largest ever repatriation of spent nuclear fuel.

The agency's administrator, Tom D'Agostino, said the campaign is a major step toward the goal of securing all nuclear material worldwide within four years.

"These shipments also support the goals of the April 2010 Nuclear Security Summit where 47 nations committed to strengthening nuclear security and reducing the threat of nuclear terrorism," D'Agostino said. "Our close partnership with Poland to eliminate this excess nuclear material reduces the risk that it could be stolen by terrorists and sets an important example for other countries to follow."

Available at:
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2010/10/13/US-announces-repatriation-of-spent-fuel/UPI-36481286942944/


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F.  Links of Interest

1.
U.N. Nuclear Agency Faces Dilemma Over Syria
Fredrik Dahl
Reuters
10/13/2010
(for personal use only)
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE69C1QL20101013


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2.
Russia Loses Money, Reputation Over S-300 Sale Ban - Expert
RIA Novosti
10/12/2010
(for personal use only)
http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20101012/160930941.html


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