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Nuclear News - 9/8/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, September 8, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Submarine Dismantlement
    1. Spent nuclear fuel from liquid metal cooled reactor unloaded in Gremikha , Bellona Foundation (9/6/2005)
B.  Nuclear Terrorism
    1. Russia to be the first to sign nuclear terrorism convention , RIA Novosti (9/7/2005)
C.  US-Russia
    1. Swiss authorities forbid Adamov to speak with relatives by phone , Yekaterina Andrianova, RIA Novosti (9/8/2005)
    2. Jailed ex-minister: U.S. needs Russia's secrets, not me , RIA Novosti (9/7/2005)
D.  Russia-North Korea
    1. Russia upbeat on North Korea six-nation nuclear talks, AFP (9/8/2005)
E.  Nuclear Forces
    1. Russian Delta-IV back from sea trials after repairs , Bellona Foundation (9/8/2005)
    2. Conscripts to get $1.7 extra for handling radioactive waste , Bellona Foundation (9/6/2005)
F.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Moscow, Beijing observe non-proliferation regime - minister, Interfax (9/8/2005)
    2. Rosenergoatom head says legal obstacles block concern's corporatization , Yekaterina Kozlova, RIA Novosti, RIA Novosti (9/8/2005)
    3. Unique nuclear waste handling facility being constructed on Kola Peninsula , Yekaterina Kozlova, RIA Novosti (9/8/2005)
    4. Russian-Chinese Experimental Fast Reactor to be ready by end of 2006 , RIA Novosti (9/7/2005)
G.  Nuclear Safety
    1. Russian nuclear official says Russia is world's third safest nuclear power , Yekaterina Kozlova, RIA Novosti (9/8/2005)
    2. International experts voice concerns over Chernobyl reactor casing , RIA Novosti (9/7/2005)
    3. Novovoronezh nuclear power plant shuts down fifth reactor , RIA Novosti (9/7/2005)
    4. Russia satisfied with atomic power plant safety exercises , RIA Novosti (9/7/2005)
H.  Official Statements
    1. PRESS RELEASE: Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Alexeyev Meets with DPRK Ambassador to Moscow Pak Ui Chun , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (9/7/2005)
I.  Items of Interest
    1. Bulava-M: still far from flying, Yury Zaitsev, RIA Novosti (9/8/2005)
    2. Nuclear 9/11: Interview with Dr. Paul L. Williams, Ryan Mauro, Global Politician (9/6/2005)
    3. No Consensus on Nuclear Supply Rules , Wade Boese, Arms Control Today (9/1/2005)
    4. Plutonium Disposition Accord Reached , Wade Boese, Arms Control Today (9/1/2005)
    5. 2005 Nunn-Lugar Report, Richard G. Lugar, Senator, Senate Foreign Relations Committee (8/1/2005)



A.  Submarine Dismantlement

1.
Spent nuclear fuel from liquid metal cooled reactor unloaded in Gremikha
Bellona Foundation
9/6/2005
(for personal use only)


Spent nuclear fuel from the from Project 705 Alfa class submarine�s metal liquid cooled reactor was unloaded at the former navy base in Gremikha on the Kola Peninsula, Interfax reported.
The operation required to heat the reactor therefore a powerful boiler-house was installed. The personnel engaged in the operation had to take a course and take exams arranged by the Russian Federal Nuclear Agency and the Defence Ministry officials.

Gremikha (Iokanga) naval base is the second onshore storage site at the Kola Peninsula for spent nuclear fuel and radwaste from submarines. The base is the easternmost Northern Fleet base at the Kola Peninsula, located some 350 kilometers east of the mouth of the Murmansk fjord. Around 800 elements from pressure water reactors are stored in Gremikha, containing 1.4 tons of nuclear fuel materials. A further six reactor cores from liquid metal reactors are also stored here onshore. Spent nuclear fuel remains in the reactors of all the 6-7 submarines laid up a piers at the base. The base also holds around 300 m3 of solid radioactive waste and around 2,000 m3 of liquid radioactive waste.

The European Bank of Reconstruction and Development set Gremikha as priority project in the program of environmental rehabilitation. In particular, France pledged to invest 900m euro in the environmental rehabilitation program of the spent nuclear fuel onshore facility, reported Interfax.


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B.  Nuclear Terrorism

1.
Russia to be the first to sign nuclear terrorism convention
RIA Novosti
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW- Russia will be the first to sign the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism in New York on September 14, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Yakovenko said Wednesday in an article in the government daily Rossiiskaya Gazeta.

The UN General Assembly unanimously adopted the international document, which was proposed by Russia in 1998, on April 13, 2005.

Yakovenko said: "The adoption of the convention is the result of systematic, resourceful and energetic work, first of all on the part of Russia."

"The convention is largely an innovative document," Yakovenko said, adding that the international community had worked out a document for the first time to prevent certain terrorist attacks.

"The convention's adoption shows the resolve and capabilities of the UN member states to adapt the Organization to modern realities and security requirements," the official said.

Yakovenko said that many countries would follow Russia's example, first of all the participants in a UN Security Council session at the World Summit 2005, which will be held in New York on September 14-16. An anti-terrorist resolution, which includes a call to countries to make signing the convention a priority, should be adopted at the summit.


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C.  US-Russia

1.
Swiss authorities forbid Adamov to speak with relatives by phone
Yekaterina Andrianova
RIA Novosti
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


GENEVA - The Swiss authorities prohibited Russian ex-Nuclear Power Minister Yevgeny Adamov from speaking to relatives over the phone Thursday after his unsanctioned telephone interview with the Ekho Moskvy radio.

Adamov is currently in a Bern prison, in Switzerland pending decisions on Russian an American extradition requests.

Folco Galli, the spokesman for the Swiss Justice Department, said Adamov abused his freedoms and the Swiss authorities cannot trust him.

However, Galli said the prohibition could be temporary and Adamov may be permitted telephone conversations with relatives again under supervision.

The interview with Adamov was broadcast live on Ekho Moskvy on Tuesday, September 6.

Adamov was the Russian nuclear minister from 1998-2001.


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2.
Jailed ex-minister: U.S. needs Russia's secrets, not me
RIA Novosti
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - A former nuclear power minister of Russia who is currently in a Swiss prison has said he cannot guarantee Russia's state secrets if he is extradited to the United States, a leading Russian business daily reported Wednesday.

Kommersant wrote that the Swiss authorities had arrested Yevgeny Adamov in Bern at the request of Mary Beth Buchanan, the attorney for the U.S. Western District of Pennsylvania, on May 2. Buchanan accused Yevgeny Adamov and his business partner Mark Kaushansky, an American citizen, of embezzling more than $9 million allocated by the U.S. Government in the early 1990s for research into nuclear safety.

On Tuesday, a Moscow radio station broadcasted a live interview with Adamov from prison. According to the paper, he said the U.S. authorities were pursuing only one goal: to prove that Russian authorities were absolutely corrupt.

Kommersant cited Adamov as saying that when the Swiss authorities secured the arrest and extradition from the U.S. of former Kremlin property manager Pavel Borodin in January 2001, they needed President Boris Yeltsin, and not him.

According to the paper, Adamov said he was sure that the U.S. wanted to prove that the Russian authorities were corrupt, and that the West did not want to lose control over Russia's nuclear arsenals.

In his opinion, the United States is not afraid of losing a courtroom battle against him because Washington "needs a handcuffed person that knows state secrets."

"There may be some problems with state secrets even if I spend one night in a U.S. prison," Adamov said.

The paper wrote that the former minister was sending a message to everyone who wanted to guard state secrets, but who was in no hurry to secure his release. "I think that every country has enough leverage to do so," Adamov said. "I am counting on my country's help."

The paper said Adamov had recently agreed to a simplified extradition to Russia, which has also opened proceedings against him, and said he was ready to face a Russian court on the U.S. charges. In response, the U.S. Department of Justice had confirmed its extradition request, the paper said.


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D.  Russia-North Korea

1.
Russia upbeat on North Korea six-nation nuclear talks
AFP
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The positions of the six countries involved in talks aimed at persuading North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons program "have never been as close" since the start of negotiations two years ago, Russian Vice Foreign Minister Alexander Alexeyev said Thursday in Moscow.
"We see that there is real agreement on most of the points of a joint statement that is to set out the common objectives and principles of the six-nation talks," Alexeyev was quoted as saying by the Interfax news agency.

"This shows that the positions of the parties have never been as close since the start of the talks," he said.

The negotiations between China, the United States, the two Koreas, Russia and Japan are set to resume on September 13, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Thursday in Beijing.

The talks were adjourned early August when Washington rejected Pyongyang's demand for its "unconditional right" to use nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

The negotiations had been scheduled to resume in the last week of August but North Korea refused to return to the table, saying war games between South Korea and the United States created the wrong atmosphere.

Despite the agreement to meet again, few signs have emerged since the fourth round recessed after 13 days of fruitless talks that North Korea or the United States are willing to budge from their positions.

Pyongyang is insisting that the United States should allow it the right to use civilian nuclear energy in return for disbanding its atomic arms program, but the demand has been rejected by Washington.

The United States points to Pyongyang's failure to confine such a program to peaceful purposes in the past.


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E.  Nuclear Forces

1.
Russian Delta-IV back from sea trials after repairs
Bellona Foundation
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


Delta-IV Tula returned from sea trials on September 3 back to Zvezdochka shipyard where it is undergoing overhaul.

The project 667 Tula, Delta-IV (factory no.382) began its third trials this year on August 29 in the White Sea after repair works at the Zvezdochka shipyard.

According to Interfax news agency, the main task of the trials was testing acoustic systems and the submarine�s systems. The shipyard�s trials were combined with the acceptance trials therefore the Northern Fleet�s representatives were onboard Tula during the trials. The shipyard�s specialists should correct the faults revealed by the Northern Fleet representatives and then after the trials no.4 it should be decided whether the sub is ready to return to active service.

Earlier in July, Tula went to sea trials twice. There it performed a test dive, the accuracy of the magnet compass and speed measurements was checked, and various electric and magnet parameters were examined. The submarine is scheduled to return to active service in 2005. The Zvezdochka shipyard�s specialists said to Interfax they had carried out works to prolong the lifetime of the submarine in the way it �will not reflect negative on the crew and environment safety�. Before Tula the shipyard has successfully repaired Verhoturye and Ekaterinburg, the subs of the same class.

K-114 was built at the Sevmash plant in 1987. Tuka is one of the last Soviet built subs and it got its name in 1995 together with the sponsorship from the city of Tula. Submarines of the Project 667BDRM (Delta IV) class entered service in 1985-1991. The total of 7 ships of this class was built. Submarines of this class carry the D-16RM missile system with 16 R-29RM (SS-N-23) missiles.


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2.
Conscripts to get $1.7 extra for handling radioactive waste
Bellona Foundation
9/6/2005
(for personal use only)


The Russian defence minister signed an order concerning salary raise for any Russian military serviceman handling nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The size of the bonus differs significantly for the conscripts and the professional contract soldiers, Moskovsky Komsomolets newspaper reported with reference to the defence minister. Ten percent of the Russian military servicemen are engaged in loading nuclear fuel and handling radioactive waste. According to the order the contract soldiers will get 35% increase to their current salary, while the raise for the conscripts will be just $1.7 per month.

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F.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Moscow, Beijing observe non-proliferation regime - minister
Interfax
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


SOCHI - Arms deals between Moscow and Beijing are based on the principles of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said on Thursday.

"Russia's only guideline in military-technical cooperation with China is the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty," he said.


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2.
Rosenergoatom head says legal obstacles block concern's corporatization
Yekaterina Kozlova, RIA Novosti
RIA Novosti
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


MURMANSK - Legal obstacles are blocking the corporatization of Rosenergoatom, the state electric and thermal energy producer at nuclear power plants, the concern's head said Thursday.

Nikolai Sorokin, the Rosenergoatom director and member of the committee for the corporatization, said laws on the use of the nuclear energy envisage the possibility for corporatization of Rosenergoatom, but there is no mechanism of corporatization.

The necessary documents are currently being prepared so that the government's decision on the corporatization would be implemented in 2006, Sorokin said.

Orders were given and special commissions and working groups were set up by the government to prepare Rosenrgoatom for corporatization.


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3.
Unique nuclear waste handling facility being constructed on Kola Peninsula
Yekaterina Kozlova
RIA Novosti
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


MURMANSK - The construction of a unique radioactive waste processing facility will be completed at the Kola nuclear power plant (NPP) in northern Russia in late 2005, said a spokesman for Rosenergoatom, a division of the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency that oversees civilian nuclear power plant management.

"The deadline for commissioning the facility has been scheduled for the end of 2005," Rosenergoatom's Technical Director Nikolai Sorokin said at a news conference at the Kola NPP. "It will still take long to prepare it for operation," Sorokin said.

The new technology to be used at the facility was developed by Russian experts, he said, and applied at the world's first nuclear power plant in Obninsk in the Kaluga region near Moscow.

"Now it will be applied on an industrial level," Sorokin said.

He said the new technology allowed for purifying nuclear water at a higher degree, resulting in a considerable reduction of radioactive wastes.


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4.
Russian-Chinese Experimental Fast Reactor to be ready by end of 2006
RIA Novosti
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The construction of the China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR), a joint Russian-Chinese project, will be finished by the end of 2006, the Russian Federal Nuclear Agency said Wednesday.

The 65-megawatt reactor is being built in China under an inter-governmental agreement signed on July 18, 2000 between China and Russia.

Fuel for starting the reactor has already been delivered and the main components have already been installed in the building containing the reactor. Parts of the main body of the reactor are being transported to the assembling area.


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G.  Nuclear Safety

1.
Russian nuclear official says Russia is world's third safest nuclear power
Yekaterina Kozlova
RIA Novosti
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)


MURMANSK/MOSCOW - Russia ranks third among the world's nuclear powers in terms of the safety of its nuclear plants, the technical director of the Russian Federal Nuclear Power Agency said.

"During the last few years, the number of safety violations in Russian plants has steadily declined," Nikolai Sorokin said at a press conference.

Russia is significantly behind Japan and slightly behind Germany in this area, he said.

Sorokin cited automatic emergency shutdown systems and the number of safety violations as measures of nuclear power safety.


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2.
International experts voice concerns over Chernobyl reactor casing
RIA Novosti
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


KIEV - Structural components of the sarcophagus housing the remains of Chernobyl's nuclear plant's fourth reactor are damaged, and are in danger of breaking and releasing radioactive matter, the Chernobyl Forum said in Ukrainian newspaper Segodnya.

The press service of the Ukrainian Emergencies Ministry said the current casing will remain safe long enough for a new "arch" to be built over the sarcophagus.

The new shelter will be in the form of an arch, 100 meters high and 250 meters wide. It will be assembled at a safe place near the reactor, and then mounted over the old casing.

A tender will be held for the construction of the shelter at the end of November, the press service said. Work will then begin work on the shelter's construction, involving 3,000 highly paid specialists.

Some international experts estimate that around 4,000 people have died since an explosion all but destroyed the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 and released radioactive emissions that badly contaminated large areas of the western Soviet Union. Around 600,000 "liquidators" involved in the cleanup operation were exposed to high levels of radiation. Around 4,000 people who were exposed to radiation from the reactor, mainly children, were diagnosed with thyroid cancer.

The Chernobyl Forum includes eight UN agencies, the World Bank, Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine.


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3.
Novovoronezh nuclear power plant shuts down fifth reactor
RIA Novosti
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


VORONEZH - The fifth reactor at the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was shut down Wednesday for maintenance, an official at the plant said.

The reactor was initially stopped for maintenance in late June 2004. Technicians from the plant and Rosenergoatom, the state's nuclear power generator, replaced all 109 pipes with new ones and changed defective parts in the VVER-1000 reactor lid.

The fifth block only became operational on August 30, 2005, since its start-up had been postponed many times due to cracks in the welded seams of the reactor lid.

On August 30 and September 2 two generating units (N14 and N13, respectively) were switched on, and on September 3 the fifth block produced 910 megawatts, 91% of its 1000-megawatt design capacity.

An emergency shutdown of the reactor occurred September 5. The causes are being analyzed, the official said. He added that the third and fourth blocks of the NPP were fully operational, and the radiation environment was normal.


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4.
Russia satisfied with atomic power plant safety exercises
RIA Novosti
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, September 7 (RIA Novosti) - Head of the Federal Atomic Energy Agency Alexander Rumyantsev is satisfied with the on-going comprehensive nuclear power safety exercises, the state-run Rosenergoatom consortium, which operates the nation's nuclear power plants, said in a statement Wednesday.

Rumyantsev heard reports on the pace of the exercises being held at the Kola nuclear power plant in northwestern Russia. The plant's personnel are practicing operating special equipment, including robotic devices and measures to protect the residents of adjacent populated areas.

The exercises cover NPP anti-accident procedures, including those dealing with the safety of staff and the population.

The drill feigns an emergency situation and a plan of urgent action for personnel protection.

It is being supervised by the management of Rosenergoatom and the Kola NPP.


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H.  Official Statements

1.
PRESS RELEASE: Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Alexeyev Meets with DPRK Ambassador to Moscow Pak Ui Chun
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
9/7/2005
(for personal use only)


1830-07-09-2005


On September 7 Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Alexander Alexeyev received Ambassador of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to Moscow Pak Ui Chun at his request.
In the course of the conversation the sides exchanged views on issues relating to the continuation of the fourth round of six-party talks to resolve the nuclear problem of the Korean Peninsula.


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I.  Items of Interest

1.
Bulava-M: still far from flying
Yury Zaitsev
RIA Novosti
9/8/2005
(for personal use only)
http://en.rian.ru/analysis/20050908/41341829.html


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2.
Nuclear 9/11: Interview with Dr. Paul L. Williams
Ryan Mauro
Global Politician
9/6/2005
(for personal use only)
http://globalpolitician.com/articledes.asp?ID=1170&cid=11&sid=62


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3.
No Consensus on Nuclear Supply Rules
Wade Boese
Arms Control Today
9/1/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2005_09/NoConsensusNukeSupply.asp


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4.
Plutonium Disposition Accord Reached
Wade Boese
Arms Control Today
9/1/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2005_09/PlutoniumDisposition.asp


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5.
2005 Nunn-Lugar Report
Richard G. Lugar, Senator
Senate Foreign Relations Committee
8/1/2005
(for personal use only)
http://lugar.senate.gov/nunnlugar.html


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DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of RANSAC. RANSAC takes no responsibility for the technical accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

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