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Nuclear News - 9/26/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, September 26, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Submarine Dismantlement
    1. Russia expects $120mln-plus from abroad to scrap nuclear submarines , Olga Vtorova, RIA Novosti (9/26/2005)
B.  Nuclear Terrorism
    1. Counter Terrorism Exercises Finished at the Beloyarskaya NPP , A. Deyanev, Translator, Department of Energy. ural.rian.ru (9/23/2005)
C.  Cooperative Threat Reduction
    1. Congressman Questions Threat Reduction Accounting, David Ruppe, Global Security Newswire (9/26/2005)
D.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy
    1. Anti-terrorism measures, energy dialogue to dominate Russia-EU summit , RIA Novosti (9/26/2005)
    2. Finland prepares to fund dismantling of Russian plutonium reactor, STT NewsRoom Finland (9/23/2005)
E.  US-Russia
    1. Russia sets unique example of real nuke disarmament, ITAR-TASS (9/26/2005)
F.  Russia-Iran
    1. Russia: Iran Should Follow UN Nuclear Watchdog Resolution, Associated Press (9/25/2005)
    2. Lavrov: Russia against sending Iran's nuclear dossier to UNSC , IRNA (9/23/2005)
G.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Official calls Russian nuclear industry vital element of world energy, ITAR-TASS (9/26/2005)
    2. Russian nuclear head says IAEA should guarantee fuel to nations giving up uranium enrichment, RIA Novosti (9/26/2005)
    3. Russia Will Build a Laser Capable of Replacing Nuclear Tests, A. Dianov , Translator, DOE-Moscow., Rosbalt.ru (9/14/2005)
H.  Nuclear Safety
    1. Expedition examining potentially dangerous objects in Kara Sea , Bellona Foundation (9/26/2005)
I.  Official Statements
    1. PRESS RELEASE: Concerning Adoption by IAEA Board of Governors of Resolution on Iran , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (9/25/2005)
    2. PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Speaks to British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw by Telephone , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (9/24/2005)
    3. PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Speaks to US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice by Telephone , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (9/23/2005)
J.  Items of Interest
    1. Closed Doors: In Russia, Securing Its Nuclear Arsenal Is an Uphill Battle--Despite U.S. Help, Program Faces Resistance, Delays Amid Chill in Relations--A Warehouse Sits Empty, Carla Anne Robbins and Alan Cullison, The Wall Street Journal (9/26/2005)
    2. Analysis: Former Russian nuke Minister Adamov caught in diplomatic extradition battle , Anna Kireeva. Translated by Charles Digges, Bellona Foundation (9/23/2005)



A.  Submarine Dismantlement

1.
Russia expects $120mln-plus from abroad to scrap nuclear submarines
Olga Vtorova
RIA Novosti
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


ST. PETERSBURG - Russia's Federal Atomic Energy Agency Rosatom is expecting more than $120 million from a number of countries to scrap decommissioned nuclear submarines, a Rosatom spokesman said Monday at an international conference on nuclear security economics in St. Petersburg.

According to deputy head of Rosatom Sergei Antipov, the governments of Germany, the United Kingdom, Norway, Sweden, France, Canada, Japan, Australia and the European Union will allot the funds, with talks on South Korea joining the program already underway.

Antipov also said about $70 million was to be allocated for scrapping nuclear submarines from the 2006 Russian budget.

The Russian Navy has decommissioned a total of 196 atomic submarines since the 1980s, but only scrapped 115 of them.

"The government ordered the disposal of all [decommissioned] nuclear submarines by 2010. Eighteen submarines will be dismantled this year and some 15 others next year," Antipov said.

The aggregate capacity of all the 250 reactors on board the submarines equals that of the country's nuclear power plants, making disposal a huge problem, he said


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B.  Nuclear Terrorism

1.
Counter Terrorism Exercises Finished at the Beloyarskaya NPP
A. Deyanev, Translator
Department of Energy. ural.rian.ru
9/23/2005
(for personal use only)


On September 15, the counter terrorism exercises Atom-2005 finished at the Beloyarskaya NPP in Sverdlovsk Oblast.

The goal of the ten-day exercises was to improve coordination among the FSB, the GUVD and Emercom of Sverdlovsk Oblast, internal troops of the RF MVD, and Rosenergoatom in case of a terrorist threat to a nuclear site, a Rosenergoatom source said.

According to the plan, 'terrorist groups' planning to attack government bodies and prepare an assault at the Beloyarskaya NPP were to infiltrate the city of Zarechny, he added.

To spot and capture the 'terrorists', a special plan was put into action. Reinforced patrols and scout groups combed the territory adjacent to the nuclear power plant, carefully observed even under routine conditions.

Specially trained dogs were widely used. They helped track down the 'terrorists' and were 'posted' at Zarechny checkpoints to detect arms, drugs, and explosives.

Operative tracking helped spot and neutralize a number of 'terrorists,' attempting to enter the city of Zarechny as common citizens, and fishing for information on the NPP functioning.

In the course of the exercises real crimes were uncovered. Firearms were confiscated and drugs found. A number of people wanted by national and international law were arrested.

At the final stage of the exercises the UFSB special task force held an operation to assault a site captured by the 'terrorists.' The criminals were neutralized and detained, the 'hostages' liberated.

The exercises have proved that the Beloyarskaya NPP is securely protected from possible terrorist attacks, an NPP spokesman said.


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C.  Cooperative Threat Reduction

1.
Congressman Questions Threat Reduction Accounting
David Ruppe
Global Security Newswire
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON -- A prominent congressional supporter of U.S.-funded nuclear, chemical and biological weapons threat-reduction efforts in Russia last week questioned whether much of the funding provided to Moscow is being used for its intended purpose.

Experts noted that most of the $1 billion the United States spends annually on threat reduction is provided to U.S. entities, not to Russian authorities.

On two occasions last week, Representative Christopher Shays (R-Conn.) said he believes there is no good accounting of how the money, intended mostly to secure and eliminate former Soviet weapons and materials, is spent and suspects that a good deal of it is being used by Russia for other purposes.

"I think the Russians don�t spend half the money we give them. And...they don�t quantify what they do," he said at a hearing Thursday.

Shays noted a January 2003 visit he made to a nuclear submarine disposal site in Murmansk where he said Russia was billing the United States for thousands of working-people.

"It�s a huge site. I counted less than 30 people. I started to raise questions about the thousands of people they are billing us for. They would not show me any more than the 30, and I think I saw the major site," he said.

He added that he continues to support program funding: "I�m willing to spend even bad money on this."

He made similar comments Tuesday during a panel discussion at Georgetown University.

Shays this year co-authored legislation intended to strengthen threat reduction, including by creating a White House office to coordinate and oversee the multiagency activities. The legislation has not yet been subject to a committee vote.

Too Much Accounting Asserted

Shays� conclusions were challenged in part by two nuclear terrorism experts who testified at the hearing, Raymond Juzaitis, associate director for nonproliferation, arms control and international security at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Glenn Schweitzer, director for Central Europe and Eurasia at the National Academy of Sciences.

"If I have any criticism of the [Energy Department] program it�s that they�re spending too much time auditing the money," Juzaitis said, speaking of the agency�s programs to secure fissile materials.

"Most of the money goes to the United States. It doesn�t go to Russia. And I�ll bet we have 150 visitors in the [Energy Department�s Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program] in Russia today. We get the reports every week of how many Americans are over there auditing what�s going on. And it�s enormous," he said.

"So I think it�s a bad rap for DOE to say that their money is being ripped off. It�s certainly not, at least in my view," he said.

Schweitzer said Russia may not always be spending the money well, but he added, "I don�t think it�s going into the director�s pocket. I don�t think it�s going into a new Mercedes, which was the worry 15 years ago. I don�t think that is happening with the DOE program for protecting fissile material."

Shays challenged him. "Why? You just don�t think it? ...On what basis can you come to that conclusion?

Schweitzer responded, "We�ve seen the expenditure records. And we�ve seen the actual upgrades."

Of the $1 billion the United States spends annually, most is divided between Energy Department and Defense Department programs. The rest, about $70 million, is spent by the State Department.

Shay�s anecdote appeared to reference threat-reduction activities funded by the Defense Department�s "Nunn-Lugar" program (see GSN, Aug. 24).

Andy Fisher, spokesman for Senator Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), said by e-mail that U.S. Nunn-Lugar money does not go to Russian authorities.

"More than 80 percent of Nunn-Lugar funds go to U.S. contractors. The remainder is paid directly to scientists or [ex-weapons program workers] and in a few [instances] to Russia after work is completed," he said.


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D.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy

1.
Anti-terrorism measures, energy dialogue to dominate Russia-EU summit
RIA Novosti
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - British Ambassador to Russia Tony Brenton said Monday anti-terrorism measures and energy cooperation would be central issues on the agenda of the Russia-European Union summit in early October.

Brenton said the summit would also address the EU's participation in welfare projects in the North Caucasus, visa agreements with Russia, and critical international issues, including Iran's nuclear program, developments in the Middle East, and UN reform.

British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Russian President Vladimir Putin are expected to meet on the sidelines of the summit, the diplomat said.


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2.
Finland prepares to fund dismantling of Russian plutonium reactor
STT NewsRoom Finland
9/23/2005
(for personal use only)


Finland prepares to participate in the funding of the closing of the plutonium reactor of a nuclear power plant in Zheleznogorsk, Russia. Finland is thinking of spending 500,000 euros for the purpose.

Finland aims at reaching a decision with the United States by the end of this year.

The project is part of the Global Partnership programme of G8. The programme aims at dismantling safely the arsenal of weapons of mass destruction dating to the Soviet era. Finland has participated earlier in the programme by destroying chemical weapons and improving nuclear safety.

The Siberian plant is to be closed down by the end of 2010.

Finland has also decided to continue participation in the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. Finland has currently 92 peacekeepers and 3 civilian experts in the area.


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E.  US-Russia

1.
Russia sets unique example of real nuke disarmament
ITAR-TASS
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


VIENNA - Russia's slashing of excessive nuclear arsenals set an unprecedented example of real nuclear disarmament and consolidation of nonproliferation mechanism, the Director of the Russian Atomic Energy Agency, Alexander Rumyantsev said Monday.

As he addressed a session of the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference, Rumyantsev said: "Action under a Russian-U.S. agreement on the use of high-enriched uranium taken out of nuclear weapons -- the so-called HEU-LEU agreement -- set a vivid example of how Russia follows the path of curtailing nuclear arsenals."

He indicated that the Russian-U.S. intergovernmental program is also known as Megatons to Megawatts. It envisions downgrading of weapons-grade uranium from nuclear weapons and its further supplies to the U.S. as fuel for nuclear power plants.


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F.  Russia-Iran

1.
Russia: Iran Should Follow UN Nuclear Watchdog Resolution
Associated Press
9/25/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW (AP)--Russia called on Iran to cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency, after the new U.N. nuclear watchdog adopted a resolution that puts Tehran just one step away from referral to the Security Council.

In a statement posted on its Web site late Saturday, the Foreign Ministry also said that the resolution noted that Iran had achieved "good progress" in meeting some of the IAEA concerns over its disputed nuclear programs.

Russia, along with China, abstained from the measure passed Saturday, which Tehran rejected as "political, illegal and illogical."

"We expect that Iran will actively cooperate with the IAEA with the purpose of quickly closing all outstanding questions," the ministry statement said.

Diplomats said Iran could be referred to the Security Council as early as November unless it dispels international concerns.

Tehran maintains its nuclear program is for generating electricity.



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2.
Lavrov: Russia against sending Iran's nuclear dossier to UNSC
IRNA
9/23/2005
(for personal use only)


Moscow - Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said here Friday his country was against sending Iran's nuclear dossier to the UN Security Council.

Speaking to reporters, Lavrov said, "We believe the problem can be solved in the framework of IAEA's regulations".

He stressed that the efforts should be based on ElBaradei's report to the IAEA and that some progress has been achieved in this concern.

Lavrov added ElBaradei's report does not say that the problem cannot be settled in the IAEA and it does not recommend that Iran's dossier should be referred to the UN Security Council.

Russian foreign minister said, "Russia has proposed that the IAEA Board of Governing resolution concerning Iran's nuclear programme should be drawn up according to the ElBaradei's report."

He concluded if IAEA asks Iran to be more active in cooperation with the Agency, the move can be more appropriate and suitable.


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G.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Official calls Russian nuclear industry vital element of world energy
ITAR-TASS
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


VIENNA - Russian nuclear industry is a crucial element of the world atomic energy sector, the Director of Russian Atomic Energy Agency, Alexander Rumyantsev said Monday at a session of the International Atomic Energy Agency�s General Conference.

"Russia is ready to remain an active participant in developing global atomic energy for the benefit of entire humankind," he said.

The Russian delegation welcomed the efforts of the IAEA Secretariat to promote international projects in the area of innovative nuclear reactor technologies and fuel cycles.

"We�d like to say in this connection the Secretariat might consider a program of assistance to the IAEA member-states in doing expert assessments of their nuclear industry systems on the basis of innovative technology methods," Rumyantsev said.

Russia submitted to the General Conference a draft resolution on supporting the innovative methodology that takes account of the tasks the global nuclear industry will have to solve in 2006 and 2007.

"We�d be glad to see adoption of the draft resolution at this session," he said.

Russia also hopes that an agreement on building an international thermonuclear reactor will be signed in the short term, Rumyantsev said.


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2.
Russian nuclear head says IAEA should guarantee fuel to nations giving up uranium enrichment
RIA Novosti
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


VIENNA - The UN nuclear watchdog should create a mechanism for guaranteed fuel supplies to nations that give up their uranium enrichment programs, the head of Russia's Federal Nuclear Energy Agency said Monday.

Alexander Rumyantsev, leading the Russian delegation to the International Atomic Energy Agency's 49th general assembly in Vienna, said such a mechanism could be established through bilateral intergovernmental agreements envisaging the supply of nuclear reactors and fuel, with the waste to be returned to the supplier.

The Bushehr plant, the only ongoing nuclear cooperation project between Russia and Iran, will be implemented in strict compliance with international law and IAEA regulations, Rumyantsev said. The facility's first reactor is expected to be launched in 2006.

Moscow and Tehran are cooperating under protocol on the supply of nuclear fuel and the return of waste. But the future of their nuclear cooperation looks uncertain in the light of the IAEA Board of Governors' recent decision to refer Iran's nuclear program to the UN Security Council. The body may decide to impose sanctions on Tehran, including an economic embargo and a comprehensive ban on nuclear experiments, meaning the construction of a second Bushehr reactor will have to be put on hold indefinitely.


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3.
Russia Will Build a Laser Capable of Replacing Nuclear Tests
A. Dianov , Translator, DOE-Moscow.
Rosbalt.ru
9/14/2005
(for personal use only)


As reported by ITAR-TASS, Academician Radiy Ilkayev announced at the first meeting of RAS Presidium after the summer vacations that the Federal Nuclear Center in Sarov would build a complex laser unit Iskra-6, capable of replacing nuclear tests in laboratory conditions.

Under the conditions when all nuclear tests have been prohibited, "in order to maintain an adequate level of nuclear science research and nuclear warheads, the country needs a powerful laser facility." The Academician explained that "only such a unit can obtain thermonuclear burning of fusion in laboratory conditions and irradiation of variously configured targets with a powerful laser beam."

Ilkayev reminded that a similar small-yield unit Iskra-5 had been operated in Sarov for a long time. "We have already developed an intermediary model of the new unit, a Luch facility, which has already produced most interesting academic and practical results in the area of thermonuclear plasma fusion. Activities are under way to create the first in Russia super-powerful laser unit on which works concerning irradiation of various targets will begin in 2007," said Academician Ilkayev.

Mr. Ilkayev believes that all these Russian scientists' achievements provide evidence that "research on laser topics are at an appropriate level in Russia, matching the global standards of the "club" of leading laser countries of the world, the U.S., Japan, and France."


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H.  Nuclear Safety

1.
Expedition examining potentially dangerous objects in Kara Sea
Bellona Foundation
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)


The scientific expedition on board Professor Shtokman research ship left Arkhangelsk on September 8 in order to examine the zones with potentially dangerous objects in the Kara Sea near Novaya Zemlya archipelago.

In particular, the members of the expedition will confirm or disprove the data about the places where after the second world war chemical weapon, radioactive waste, parts of the submarines and nuclear icebreakers were sunk. During the 23 days expedition the scientists should examine, evaluate the state of the objects and make the forecast for the nearest years, Interfax reported.

The research ship Professor Shtokman is well equipped and allows to conduct research in many various ways: geolocation, electrochemical (measurement of salinity, oxygen and hydrogen content etc.), magnetometric. The tests of the water and sediments will be taken for further examination. The analysis on the sites will be carried out with the help of probes. The reports will be handed over to the Russian Emergency Ministry in order to issue a registry of the underwater potentially dangerous objects.


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I.  Official Statements

1.
PRESS RELEASE: Concerning Adoption by IAEA Board of Governors of Resolution on Iran
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
9/25/2005
(for personal use only)


On September 24, the IAEA Board of Governors passed a resolution over the Iranian nuclear program. The resolution concentrates on the remaining questions about Iran's nuclear activities and ways to resolve the situation. It is important that the document, citing IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei's report, notes the "good progress" achieved by Iran in rectifying omissions in compliance with its Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA.

The Russian Federation abstained in the vote along with China, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and a group of other states. Our decision was prompted by the fact that the resolution contains some ambiguous assessments and controversial schemes to deal with the situation.

We are viewing the resolution as a signal for continuing and building up cooperation by the IAEA with Iran to clarify the remaining questions about Teheran's nuclear program. It is our belief that the potential of IAEA makes it possible to keep the settlement of the Iranian problem within the Agency.

We expect Iran to actively cooperate with the IAEA so as to close the remaining issues as soon as possible.

The Russian side considers it necessary to use the time before the upcoming next session in November of the IAEA Board of Governors to work out a constructive program of joint actions which on the one hand would provide reliable guarantees of the peaceful orientation of the Iranian nuclear program, and on the other - would guarantee Iran's right to peaceful uses of atomic energy.


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2.
PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Speaks to British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw by Telephone
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
9/24/2005
(for personal use only)


A telephone conversation took place on September 23 between Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov and British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw.

The ministers exchanged views on the situation at the session of the IAEA Board of Governors (September 19-23), with the Russian side calling for providing conditions for continuing quiet depoliticized work within the IAEA on the Iranian dossier.


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3.
PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Speaks to US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice by Telephone
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
9/23/2005
(for personal use only)


A telephone conversation took place on September 23 between Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov and US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

There was expressed on the Russian side readiness to provide necessary assistance if the Southern United States is again hit by a natural calamity.

Certain pressing international issues also were touched upon; in particular, the course of the discussion of the topic of Iran's nuclear program at the meeting of the IAEA Board of Governors.


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J.  Items of Interest

1.
Closed Doors: In Russia, Securing Its Nuclear Arsenal Is an Uphill Battle--Despite U.S. Help, Program Faces Resistance, Delays Amid Chill in Relations--A Warehouse Sits Empty
Carla Anne Robbins and Alan Cullison
The Wall Street Journal
9/26/2005
(for personal use only)
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112770020335451782,00.html?mod=home%5Fpag..


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2.
Analysis: Former Russian nuke Minister Adamov caught in diplomatic extradition battle
Anna Kireeva. Translated by Charles Digges
Bellona Foundation
9/23/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.bellona.no/en/international/russia/nuke_industry/co-operation/399..


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DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of RANSAC. RANSAC takes no responsibility for the technical accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

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