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Nuclear News - 9/15/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, September 15, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Submarine Dismantlement
    1. Spent nuclear fuel to be unloaded from two retired submarines in Severodvinsk , Bellona Foundation (9/14/2005)
B.  Nuclear Terrorism
    1. Putin signs intl convention against nuclear terrorism at UN summit , AFX (9/14/2005)
C.  US-Russia
    1. Putin to US for UN General assembly, Bush summit., ITAR-TASS (9/14/2005)
    2. Ivanov says unaware U.S. might alter world nuclear policy , RIA Novosti (9/13/2005)
    3. Russia warns U.S. against new nuclear doctrine, Reuters (9/13/2005)
D.  Russia-Iran
    1. Russian, Iranian presidents discuss power plant construction , RIA Novosti (9/15/2005)
E.  Russia-North Korea
    1. Diplomacy is the way to break stalemate in Iran and North Korea - Kremlin , RIA Novosti (9/15/2005)
F.  Nuclear Forces
    1. Unloading of spent nuclear fuel from Russian nuclear cruiser postponed till the end of September , Bellona Foundation (9/14/2005)
    2. Indian, Russian forces to conduct joint exercise , Rahul Bedi , JDW (9/1/2005)
G.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Russia ready to cooperate with Argentina - Putin , RIA Novosti (9/15/2005)
    2. Russia wants to build more units at Tianwan nuke plant , Xinhua News Agency (9/15/2005)
H.  Official Statements
    1. Mikhail Kamynin, the Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Answers a Media Question Regarding UN Security Council Meeting on Counterterrorism in New York , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (9/15/2005)
    2. Speech at the session of the UN Security Council , Vladimir Putin, President of the Russian Federation, The Kremlin (9/15/2005)
    3. PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Meets with Gholamreza Agazade, Iran's Vice President and the Head of Its Atomic Energy Organization, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (9/12/2005)
I.  Items of Interest
    1. The Race to Secure Russia's Loose Nukes, Andy Grotto and Brian Finlay (9/13/2005)



A.  Submarine Dismantlement

1.
Spent nuclear fuel to be unloaded from two retired submarines in Severodvinsk
Bellona Foundation
9/14/2005
(for personal use only)


The specialists of the Zvezdochka plant will unload spent nuclear fuel from Victor-III and Typhoon nuclear submarines.

The plant�s chief engineer Oleg Frolov said to Interfax that the Rosatom Commission issued permission to unload spent nuclear fuel from retired Victor-III nuclear submarine (K-502), order 641, project 671 RTM. Canada sponsors the dismantlement of this submarine. K-502 entered active service December 31, 1980.

The preparation for the same operation is under way on Typhoon nuclear submarine (TK-12), project 941, order 713. The USA in the frames of CTR program sponsors the dismantlement of this submarine. Unloading is scheduled for December. In 2006, the submarine will be placed in the dry dock for further dismantlement. Then the empty reactor compartment will be shipped for storage to the Sayda bay on the Kola Peninsula. TK-12 was in active service from 1984 till 1996.


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B.  Nuclear Terrorism

1.
Putin signs intl convention against nuclear terrorism at UN summit
AFX
9/14/2005
(for personal use only)


NEW YORK - Russian President Vladimir Putin signed an international convention on combating nuclear terrorism at the United Nations summit.

The 15-page pact, a Russian initiative, codifies definitions for trafficking in controlled nuclear materials and calls on participating states to adapt national laws to tighten controls on unsanctioned use of such materials.

A senior Russian official said that around 40 countries were expected to accede to the convention today, the first day of a three-day United Nations summit.

The preamble of the document states that signatory countries recognize the right of any state to develop and maintain peaceful nuclear energy programs.

That question is sensitive at the UN summit as the United States presses a drive to halt a nuclear program in Iran, which Tehran says is for civilian purposes but Washington suspects is a cover for atomic weapons development.

Russia is the main foreign contractor in development of Iran's nuclear program and has defended Tehran's right to develop atomic energy while saying any move to build nuclear weapons would be unacceptable.

Putin was scheduled to meet one-on-one at the United Nations with Iran's new President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.


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C.  US-Russia

1.
Putin to US for UN General assembly, Bush summit.
ITAR-TASS
9/14/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir Putin has left for the United States to take part in the 60th session of the UN General Assembly in New York, attend a Russia-US summit with President George W. Bush and hold a series of meetings with world leaders.

Already on Wednesday (Moscow time) he will sign the UN International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism drafted by Russia, the first convention to be passed by the UN at the initiative of post-Soviet Russia. The convention, the first international treaty on preventing nuclear terrorism, provides for civilian and military application of nuclear materials, the prevention of terrorist attacks involving homemade nuclear devices, and the prosecution of those responsible for terrorist attacks, either via extradition or by domestic courts.

On September 15, Putin will address the United Nations General Assembly presenting Russia�s concept of further strengthening of the UN key role of the coordinating center in all fundamental issues of world politics.

"Moscow proceeds from the assumption that the Summit-2005 will become a milestone event not only for the fate of the United Nations but for the entire system of international relations in the situation of globalization," a high-ranking source in the Kremlin told Tass.

A meeting with British Prime Minister Tony Blair is also on the working schedule of the Russian president�s stay in the United States as well as meetings with Chinese, Israeli, Pakistani, Argentine, Iraqi and Iranian leaders.

On September 16, Putin will travel to Washington for a Russia-US summit with President George W. Bush.

On September 16, Putin is scheduled to meet with the leadership of US oil majors Texaco, Chevron and ConocoPhillips.

"The Russian president will visit the United States in the situation of a generally positive balance in our relationships," the Kremlin source told Tass. "Of course not everything goes smoothly as we sometimes have disaccords and differences in approaches. But the main thing is that our countries are devoted to common values, which help us find common solutions basing on principles of partnership approved by our presidents, such as transparency, predictability, confidence and respect to each other�s interests," he added.


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2.
Ivanov says unaware U.S. might alter world nuclear policy
RIA Novosti
9/13/2005
(for personal use only)


BERLIN - The United States has not informed Russia of any plans to alter world nuclear policy, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov told journalists Tuesday.

Ivanov was commenting on media reports that said the Pentagon was studying the possibility of launching nuclear strikes on terrorists' bases suspected of developing weapons of mass destruction.


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3.
Russia warns U.S. against new nuclear doctrine
Reuters
9/13/2005
(for personal use only)


BERLIN - Russian Defence Minister Sergei Ivanov warned the United States on Tuesday against any change of its defence doctrine to allow pre-emptive use of atomic weapons, saying it would prompt others to seek nuclear arms.

A draft revision of the U.S. Defense Department's nuclear operations doctrine was made available at the weekend, outlining the use of nuclear weapons to pre-empt an enemy's attack with weapons of mass destruction.

"Lowering the threshold for use of atomic weapons is in itself dangerous," Ivanov told a news conference ahead of a NATO defence ministers meeting in Berlin.

"Such plans do not limit, but in fact promote efforts by others to develop (nuclear weapons)," said Ivanov, who was speaking through an interpreter.

He said he hoped U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld would inform him if such a change to the U.S. military doctrine were planned.

The draft "Doctrine for Joint Nuclear Operations," dated March 15, revised the "discussion of nuclear weapons use across the range of military operations."

According to the document, combatant commanders could request approval from the president to use nuclear weapons under a variety of scenarios, such as to pre-empt an enemy's use of weapons of mass destruction against the United States, multinational or alliance forces or civilian populations.

A Defense Department spokesman said at the weekend the document had not yet been given to Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. It is due to be signed within the next few weeks by the director of the Joint Staff, the spokesman said.

The unclassified document was available on numerous Web sites such as GlobalSecurity.org, a defense policy Web site. A Pentagon site, however, listed the document as unavailable.


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D.  Russia-Iran

1.
Russian, Iranian presidents discuss power plant construction
RIA Novosti
9/15/2005
(for personal use only)


NEW YORK CITY - The Russian and Iranian presidents, Vladimir Putin and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, discussed Russian companies' role in the construction of power facilities in Iran, an aide to the Russian leader said Thursday.

"The leaders discussed trade and economic cooperation and the implementation of joint power projects, including the participation of Russian companies in the construction of a number of power facilities in Iran," Sergei Prikhodko said.

"They also discussed cooperation in aircraft building and on the Caspian Sea," he added.


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E.  Russia-North Korea

1.
Diplomacy is the way to break stalemate in Iran and North Korea - Kremlin
RIA Novosti
9/15/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The Russian leadership has reiterated its commitment to resolving the conflicts over Iran's and North Korea's nuclear programs through diplomacy, a Kremlin source told RIA Novosti Thursday, ahead of U.S.-Russian presidential talks on the sidelines of the UN World Summit.

The source said that at the talks, scheduled for September 16, Presidents Vladimir Putin and George W. Bush were expected to highlight the progress of the six-party negotiations on North Korea's nuclear program and to discuss ways to move the process forward.

He also said the Russian president would reemphasize the importance of further dialogue with Tehran to encourage its cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the "EU Troika" (Britain, France, and Germany).


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F.  Nuclear Forces

1.
Unloading of spent nuclear fuel from Russian nuclear cruiser postponed till the end of September
Bellona Foundation
9/14/2005
(for personal use only)


The unloading operation on the nuclear cruiser Admiral Nakhimov was postponed due to the financial constraints.

The Sevmash specialists prepared the heavy missile cruiser Admiral Nakhimov for spent nuclear fuel unloading and received the official permission for the operation. Unfortunately, the navy failed to pay for the train, which is supposed to ship the spent nuclear fuel to the Mayak plant in the South Ural, Interfax reported.

Admiral Nakhimov arrived at the Sevmash plant for planned intermediate overhaul back in 1999. The design works for the overhaul should be completed in 2006, and then the works should start on board the cruiser. The new computer equipment should be installed as well as new missile launching installations, Interfax reported.

The Russian Heavy Missile Cruise Ship, Project 1144.2 Kirov Class was built by the Baltic Shipyard in Saint Petersburg. The Kirov Class provides the capability to engage large surface ships and to defend the fleet against air and submarine attack. Four cruisers were built but only Admiral Nakhimov (commissioned in 1988) and Pyotr Velikhiy (commissioned in 1995) remain active.


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2.
Indian, Russian forces to conduct joint exercise
Rahul Bedi
JDW
9/1/2005
(for personal use only)


New Delhi -- Indian and Russian Special Forces will conduct their first-ever joint exercise in October, focusing on jointness in airborne anti-terrorist operations. The exercise will take place in western India's Rajasthan desert region.

Defence sources in New Delhi said the week-long manoeuvres, involving an airborne commando battalion from each side, will strive for "inter-operability" for possible future joint peacekeeping operations focused broadly on the volatile Central Asian Region.

Although Moscow is India's oldest and largest supplier of defence equipment, direct military interaction has been limited to just one round of naval manoeuvres in 2003. A second round of naval exercises is scheduled for October in the eastern Bay of Bengal in which a Russian Akula-class Type 971 nuclear powered submarine will take part.


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G.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Russia ready to cooperate with Argentina - Putin
RIA Novosti
9/15/2005
(for personal use only)


NEW YORK CITY - Russia wants to develop relations with Argentina in the nuclear, aerospace and other spheres, the Russian president said Thursday.

"We have stepped up our contacts at different levels in recent years and have successfully cooperated in international affairs," Vladimir Putin said at a meeting with his Argentinean counterpart, Nestor Kirchner. "Our trade is not high but Argentinean imports to Russia have grown by 60% in the last 1.5 years."

"We have an intergovernmental commission and are interested in the development of relations in the aerospace, energy and nuclear spheres," he added.

Putin also said that relevant business structures had been formed to promote bilateral relations.

Kirchner said that he was satisfied with bilateral relations with Russia and hoped they would develop well. He added that Russia and Argentina would cooperate further over oil and energy.


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2.
Russia wants to build more units at Tianwan nuke plant
Xinhua News Agency
9/15/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia is seeking to obtain the right to build the third and fourth generating units of China's Tianwan nuclear plant though this "is not so easy," Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (FAEA) chief Alexander Rumyantsev said on Wednesday.

The first generating unit at Tianwan, where Russian company Atomstroyexport is the general contractor, is to be launched late in 2005 or early in 2006, Rumyantsev was quoted by the Interfax news agency as saying.

According to Rumyantsev, given its fast economic growth, China would be able to develop its own nuclear technologies in seven to 10 years' time. This would preclude long-term Russian presence in the Chinese market, he hinted.

Russian companies intend to bid for all projects to build nuclear power plants abroad, and it is Russia's strategic plan to build up exports of nuclear fuel, the Interfax quoted the FAEA chief as saying.

Russia is building two generating units in India, which are going in operation in 2007 or 2008.

But as India is not a signatory to the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons it is also questionable whether Russia can expand its presence in the Indian nuclear market, and so there are international restrictions on its nuclear imports.

Meanwhile, Russia is bidding for a nuclear power plant to be built in Bulgaria, Rumyantsev said.


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H.  Official Statements

1.
Mikhail Kamynin, the Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Answers a Media Question Regarding UN Security Council Meeting on Counterterrorism in New York
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
9/15/2005
(for personal use only)


Question: How does the Foreign Ministry assess the meeting of the Security Council of the United Nations on counterterrorism-related problems, which took place in New York on September 14 with Russian President Vladimir Putin in attendance?

Answer: The Council meeting at the summit level is the response of the international community to the hugely dangerous challenge which terrorism brings to the world. Other than the UN and its Security Council, who else may assume the main burden for coordination of efforts by states in the struggle against this global evil?

Solving this task is the aim of the Council resolution which was approved unanimously. It not only accumulates the experience in the antiterrorist drive, but also sets new breakthrough tasks, including those of suppressing incitement to terrorism and criminalizing such actions by all states without exception.

The Security Council, in particular, has called upon all states:

First, to prohibit by law incitement to commit terrorist acts, second, to prevent such behavior, and third, deny safe haven to anyone who can be held guilty of such behavior on the serious grounds of relevant authentic information.

I would like to note that Russia is prepared to go even further in countering the ideology and propaganda of terrorism, and the various forms of its glorification, by emphasizing within this framework not only the considerable responsibility of states, but also of civil society, including the mass media. I am certain that we shall come to this without infringing on fundamental democratic freedoms, with reliance upon the broadest sections of the international public.

Yesterday President Putin affixed his signature to the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism. Our initiative, buttressed by the long-standing efforts of the international community, was crowned with the conclusion of a major global treaty capable of putting up a reliable barrier in the path of terrorism.

This joint success is called upon to help strengthen the international legal basis of antiterror, in particular complete, even during the current General Assembly session, the work on the draft of a Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism.


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2.
Speech at the session of the UN Security Council
Vladimir Putin, President of the Russian Federation
The Kremlin
9/15/2005
(for personal use only)


VLADIMIR PUTIN: Madam President, Dear Colleagues, Ladies and Gentlemen,

Let me note at once, that Russia attaches special significance to today's Security Council summit.

By gathering here, we are doing more than demonstrating our shared responsibility and solidarity in the struggle against global terrorism. The main point is that the UN and the Security Council can become the coordinating centre, the unique "headquarters" of the international front against terrorism. It is here today, that important ideological, political, legal, and organisational bases of the struggle against terrorism will be laid. Russia can but welcome this approach, and is ready to take part in practical measures to strengthen the United Nation's central role in maintaining international security and stability.

We share the ideas contained in the Security Council resolution that was submitted for our consideration. This resolution contains more than just reflections on previous experience gained from combating terrorism, but sets new and serious tasks, including suppressing the instigation to terror. I am convinced that such practices must be considered criminal by all states without exception.

Our shared task is to create a united front in the struggle against this evil. Any attempts to instigate terrorism, accommodate terrorists, or use terrorists for political means or goals must meet general condemnation.

It is necessary to use not only states' ressources but those of civil society, mass media, cultural and educational cooperation, and interconfessional dialogue to oppose terrorist propaganda, racist ideology, and national and religious intolerance.

On behalf of our countries, we have just signed the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism. As you know, Russia was the initiator of this document and we thank our partners for their support. The result of this teamwork is an effective legal tool to prevent real threats, such as terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction.

I also think that during the General Assembly's current session, the preparation for a comprehensive convention on international terrorism can be completed.

As a whole, the struggle against terrorism and its sources and the development of our cooperation in this area, should be a subject of constant attention of the United Nations, the Security Council, and the organisation's different bodies.

Dear Madam President, the Russian Federation is deeply convinced of the necessity to increase the efficiency of UN Security Council in the prevention of armed conflicts, including those in Africa.

In connection with this, we attach great value to the Council's resolution on this question.

I thank you for your attention.


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3.
PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Meets with Gholamreza Agazade, Iran's Vice President and the Head of Its Atomic Energy Organization
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


On September 12 Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov received Gholamreza Agazade, Iran's Vice President and the Head of Its Atomic Energy Organization, in Moscow on a working visit.

During the conversation, an exchange of views on topical issues in Russian-Iranian relations took place. There was affirmed a mutual disposition to strengthen further and expand bilateral ties in various fields.

Lavrov and Agazade examined the situation around the Iranian nuclear program, including in connection with an upcoming discussion of this question on September 19-23 at the next session of the IAEA Board of Governors.

It was reiterated on the Russian side that the report of IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei on the application of Agency safeguards in Iran creates a good basis for continued professional, depoliticized work within the framework of the IAEA in the interests of an early solution of all the remaining questions on Iran's nuclear program.


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I.  Items of Interest

1.
The Race to Secure Russia's Loose Nukes
Andy Grotto and Brian Finlay
9/13/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.americanprogress.org/site/pp.asp?c=biJRJ8OVF&b=1038435


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DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of RANSAC. RANSAC takes no responsibility for the technical accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

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