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Nuclear News - 9/12/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, September 12, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Nuclear Terrorism
    1. Russia eager to sign anti-nuclear terrorism convention - Foreign Ministry, Interfax (9/10/2005)
B.  US-Russia
    1. Russia-US Ties Strained Ahead of Leaders' Summit, Sergei Blagov, CNSNews.com (9/12/2005)
C.  Russia-Iran
    1. Bushehr power plant to become operational in 2006 , RIA Novosti (9/12/2005)
    2. Gazprom´┐Żs Subsidiary Bank Warns Investors of Iran Risks, MosNews (9/12/2005)
    3. Iran and Russia Oppose Security Council Referral, Associated Press (9/12/2005)
    4. Iran plans to step up nuclear cooperation with Russia, Tatyana Sinitsyna, RIA Novosti (9/12/2005)
    5. Russia and Iran discuss preparation for IAEA session , RIA Novosti (9/12/2005)
    6. Russian FM: Moscow keen to expand cooperation, ties with Tehran (RECASTS: Adds report on Aqazadeh's meeting with Rumyantsev) , IRNA (9/12/2005)
D.  Russia-North Korea
    1. Alexander Alexeyev:Talks on North Korea Nuclear Problem Have Never Been So Close to Agreement, Vladimir Kulikov , Interfax (9/9/2005)
E.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Russia could help Vietnam develop nuclear power , RIA Novosti (9/12/2005)
    2. Russia to Build World´┐Żs First Floating Nuclear Power Station for $200,000, MosNews (9/9/2005)
    3. Russian nuclear plants increase energy production by 3% in first two quarters of 2005 , RIA Novosti (9/9/2005)
F.  Official Statements
    1. Press Briefing in Advance of Trip to the UN General Assembly, Condoleezza Rice, U.S. Department of State (9/9/2005)
    2. At the beginning of the Meeting with Defence Minister Sergei Ivanov, Chief Commander of the Navy Vladimir Masorin, and Vladimir Kuroedov , Vladimir V. Putin, Acting President of the Russian Federation, Kremlin.ru: Meetings and Conferences (9/4/2005)
G.  Items of Interest
    1. Living in a post-9/11 world, Richard G. Lugar, Senator, Indianapolis Star (9/11/2005)
    2. US, Ukraine move to secure deadly pathogens, Jeremy Druker , ISN Security Watch , ISN Security Watch  (9/10/2005)
    3. "U.S. Wants Me for My Nuclear Secrets": Press Conference with Yevgeny Adamov, Ekho Moskvy (9/9/2005)



A.  Nuclear Terrorism

1.
Russia eager to sign anti-nuclear terrorism convention - Foreign Ministry
Interfax
9/10/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW- Russia will be the first country to sign up to the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism at the UN 2005 World Summit opens in New York on September 14, Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Mikhail Kamynin told Interfax.

"The significance that we attach to this document is evident from the fact that it was Russia that initiated the birth of this convention and will be the first to sign it," Kamynin said.

"Our logic is absolutely clear. Taking into account the aggressive tactics of terrorists, whose deeds are aimed at producing as many victims among the civilian population as possible, we need to take all possible measures to put a firm barrier that will never allow them to obtain weapons of mass destruction," the diplomat said.

Moscow has always been an active supporter of the comprehensive strengthening of the non-proliferation regime and the combat against nuclear terrorism, Kamynin said.

"We see our goal as having the convention come into legal effect in as short a time as possible," he said.

Commenting on the process of approving an Indian draft of a comprehensive convention against international terrorism in the UN, the Russian diplomat regretted that disagreements still remain on some issues. "This concerns differences in defining the concept of terrorism and drawing a clear line between the concepts of terrorism and national liberation movements," he said.

Russia is open to finding mutually acceptable solutions to the problems that remain unsettled, he said.

"This document has long been awaited and we hope that the upcoming 2005 World Summit will add an accelerating incentive to the work on it. The adoption of a comprehensive convention would significantly improve the international legal basis for fighting terrorism," Kamynin said.

The full version of Kamynin's interview will be available on www.interfax.ru on September 11.


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B.  US-Russia

1.
Russia-US Ties Strained Ahead of Leaders' Summit
Sergei Blagov
CNSNews.com
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


Moscow - Russian President Vladimir Putin is due to hold talks with President Bush in Washington this week, at a time relations have been affected by differences over Iran's nuclear ambitions, terrorism and other matters.

The two leaders are expected to discuss "a wide range of current international issues," the Kremlin said in a statement. Putin is also due to attend the United Nations summit in New York.

The U.S. believes Iran is using a civilian nuclear program, developed with the Russian assistance, to cover its development of nuclear weapons, and wants the Security Council to look into the matter.

Iran denies the charge, as does Russia, which says it opposes referral to the council.

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice last week urged Russia, as well as India and China to join the U.S. in sending a "'broad based message"' to Iran to halt its nuclear activity or face possible U.N. sanctions.

Her appeal did not appear to have changed official minds in Moscow, however. Russia's U.N. mission spokeswoman Maria Zakharova on Saturday reiterated the stance that "we see no reason to refer the matter to the U.N. Security Council."

Russia has been irked by Western questioning of its compliance with international weapons of mass destruction agreements.

The U.S. State Department said in a recent report Russia "continued to maintain" an offensive biological weapons program. The report addressed instances of countries where the U.S. says evidence exists of actual or potential noncompliance with the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention.

"Russia is dedicated to the strict adherence to the convention," Russia's foreign ministry said in response, accusing the State Department of "not tak[ing] the trouble to publish concrete facts."

The ministry also criticized what it called one-sided or inaccurate statements about Russian compliance with agreements on strategic weapons, conventional forces in Europe, and sensitive missile technology.

Another sore point in bilateral relations has to do with anti-terrorism activity, and Moscow's view that the West employs "double standards" in fighting terrorism.

Russian State Duma speaker Boris Gryzlov called on the U.N. at its gathering this week to adopt a comprehensive convention on terrorism that would "exclude any double standards."

Russia's key complaint is that Western nations do not regard the conflict in Chechnya as an integral part of the broader war against Islamist terrorism, launched after the 9/11 attacks.

In remarks to the Interfax news agency marking the fourth anniversary of 9/11 Sunday, Russian foreign ministry official Mikhail Kamynin said Moscow had repeatedly - but unsuccessfully - asked Washington and London to extradite Chechen separatist envoys Ilyas Akhmadov and Akhmed Zakayev, who have been granted political asylum in the U.S. and Britain respectively.

Kamynin also referred to a recent ABC News interview with Chechen warlord Shamil Basayev, saying it had facilitated terrorist propaganda and directed calls for violence against Russians.

U.S.-Russian ties have also been strained over what Moscow views as Western meddling in several former Soviet states which Russia considers part of its sphere of influence.

Putin told a group of Western experts at the Kremlin that Russia had no major rifts with the West over the "revolutions" which brought changes of government in Ukraine and Georgia.

At the same time, he said the West should listen to Moscow's concerns about legitimate interests in the former Soviet Union.


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C.  Russia-Iran

1.
Bushehr power plant to become operational in 2006
RIA Novosti
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russia and Iran have confirmed that they intend to commission the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) by the end of 2006, a spokesman for Russia's Federal Agency for Nuclear Power said Monday.

The agency's head, Alexander Rumyantsev, and Gholamreza Aqazadeh, the head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, met in Moscow Monday to discuss the construction of the first power unit at the Bushehr NPP and confirmed they planned to commission the plant by the end of 2006, the spokesman said.

Russian experts are currently on the final stages of the construction of the first power unit with capacity of about 1,000 Megawatts.

Earlier reports indicate that Russia is planning to build six power units at nuclear power plants in Iran within the next decade.


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2.
Gazprom´┐Żs Subsidiary Bank Warns Investors of Iran Risks
MosNews
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


Gazprombank, subsidiary bank of the Russian gas giant Gazprom, anticipates additional risks related to the acquisition of the controlling stake in the AtomStroyExport company engaged in construction of a nuclear power plant in Bushehr, Iran. The information was released on Monday, Sept 12, as part of the investors´┐Ż memorandum prepared by Gazprombank in regard to the European bonds issue.

AtomStroyExport-related risks were mentioned in the Risk Factors section of the memorandum. In this section the corporate borrowers inform international investors about possible legal risks for their business to avoid any legal challenge in the future. AtomStroyExport is mentioned both in Gazprombank´┐Żs and its parent company Gazprom´┐Żs corporate reports.

Iran resumed uranium enrichment program in August 2005. "Existing US sanctions may limit our ability to access the U.S. capital markets," Gazprombank said. "The sanctions against Iran could have a unfavorable effect on us," Gazprombank warned.

Gazprombank acquired 18 percent share of AtomStroyexport in October 2004. In March 2005 the bank raised its share in the company to 53.9 percent through acquisition of 35.9 percent of its stock. On 30 June 2005 Gazprombank put its investment in AtomStroyExport at $25.5 million. At the moment Gazprombank also serves as one of the major creditors of AtomStroyExport´┐Żs foreign contracts. Gazprombank´┐Żs credit limit for the company is $ 200 million. By the end of 2004 AtomStroyExport used up $170 million of the limit.

"Most of the financing was brokered by the Russian Federation within international agreements which allowed for AtomStroyExport to minimize political risks and guarantee the implementation of important contracts," the document says.


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3.
Iran and Russia Oppose Security Council Referral
Associated Press
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


TEHRAN, Iran / WASHINGTON -- Iran warned Sunday that referring it to the United Nations Security Council for possible sanctions over its nuclear activities would lead to a no-win situation with "certain consequences," and a top Russian diplomat on Friday warned against "hasty steps" in the growing crisis over Iran's nuclear program.

Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki also said at a news conference that Iran planned to organize tenders for building two more nuclear power plants in the Islamic republic.

Mottaki reiterated Iran's position that it would not stop uranium reprocessing. "There is no legal or legitimate reason, given Iran's transparent activities and its open cooperation with the IAEA ... that Iran be referred to the UN Security Council," Mottaki told reporters.

"If a political decision is made to refer Iran to the UN Security Council, it will be entering a lose-lose game," he added. "It will have its own certain consequences and will affect Iran's decisions. We prefer that such a game is not played."

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Friday asked Russia, China and India to support the United States in threatening Iran with sanctions for refusing to halt its nuclear program.

"Iran needs to get a message from the international community that is a unified message," Rice said at a news conference. The message, she said, is that it is not acceptable for Iran to enter into negotiations with the Europeans on adhering to its international obligations, and then to back out.

Iran refused to accept a U.S.-backed European Union offer of economic concessions to halt suspicious nuclear activities, and Rice said a drive to round up support for UN Security Council consideration of Iran's behavior was under way.

Britain, Germany and France, negotiating on behalf of the European Union, have warned that they may join in seeking to refer Iran to the Security Council if Tehran does not stop uranium conversion before a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency on Sept. 19. Approval is not assured in the Security Council.

On Friday, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Yakovenko, who held talks with British Ambassador Tony Brenton, repeated Russia's objections to referring Iran to the Security Council.

"While discussing Iran's nuclear problem, the necessity of not taking hasty steps was underscored by the Russian side," Yakovenko said, according to a Foreign Ministry statement.

The statement said that a recent report prepared by IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei would be discussed at that meeting "and further measures on resolution of the remaining issues will be determined." The report revealed seven tons of uranium hexafluoride had been produced but did not make a determination on whether Iran was using it to pursue a nuclear weapon.

"Under these conditions, we see no grounds to refer this issue, which the IAEA is now actively and productively dealing with, to the UN Security Council," the Russian statement said.


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4.
Iran plans to step up nuclear cooperation with Russia
Tatyana Sinitsyna
RIA Novosti
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The Iranian government is planning to expand cooperation with Russia, Head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran Gholamreza Agazadeh told Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov Monday.

Earlier, Agazadeh discussed with Alexander Rumyantsev, the head of the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency, the progress of the construction by Russian experts of the first power-generating unit at the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on the shore of the Persian Gulf. Rumyantsev once again assured Agazadeh that the first unit, VVER-1000, would be commissioned on schedule, no later than the end of 2006.

Experts said the construction stage was 95% complete, with the reactor's availability level at 80% and the last items of equipment being delivered.

Rumyantsev believes that the Russian-Iranian cooperation is quite proper. "The international law on the use of atomic energy for peaceful purposes and the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency provide for this stating that nuclear powers should assist non-nuclear ones if the latter wish to develop peaceful nuclear programs," he explained.

The parties earlier agreed on Russia's supplying of nuclear fuel for the power- generating unit and on the return of nuclear waste to Russia.

Iran is planning to build 20 new NPPs to achieve an eventual total output of 20,000 megawatts. The Iranian parliament ratified the relevant draft law in early 2005.

Although Russian experts would be delighted to build all of the plants, no contracts on the construction of new nuclear reactors have been signed between Moscow and Tehran. The mutual intent to continue cooperation was expressed in the form of a concept without a feasibility study or calculations.

Atomstroiexport, Russia's monopoly exporter of nuclear power equipment and services, considered several construction scenarios for an Iranian NPP. For example, it considered the possibility of picking up where Germany's Siemens left off at a half-damaged second unit or demolishing it and starting from scratch. Russian experts also considered building an NPP in a different location, near the town of Ahvaz, not far from the Iran-Iraq border. However, the project to construct an NPP in Bushehr, equipped with VVER-1000 units, appeared to be the most advantageous in terms of energy production costs. The VVER-1000 is believed to be one of the world's most reliable units, meeting current security standards.

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5.
Russia and Iran discuss preparation for IAEA session
RIA Novosti
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran Gholamreza Agazadeh discussed preparations for a regular session of the IAEA Board of Governors scheduled for September 19-23, the Russian Foreign Ministry said Monday. During their meeting, the officials focused on the Iranian nuclear problem. The Russian side said IAEA Director General Mohamed El Baradei's report on the agency's guarantees in Iran had laid a positive base to continue professional, depoliticized negotiations within the framework of the IAEA.

It is Moscow's opinion that the move to apply the guarantees is necessary for a quick resolution of all the remaining issues on Iran's nuclear program.


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6.
Russian FM: Moscow keen to expand cooperation, ties with Tehran (RECASTS: Adds report on Aqazadeh's meeting with Rumyantsev)
IRNA
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


Moscow - Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Monday that Moscow is keen to expand cooperation and relations with Tehran.

Lavrov further told visiting Iranian Vice-President and Head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization (IAEO) Gholam-Reza Aqazadeh that cooperation between Tehran and Moscow are growing as is evident in the growing trend of mutual economic transactions.

The meeting continued behind closed doors in the absence of any reporter.

Aqazadeh held another meeting with the head of the Russian Atomic Energy Agency and Russian head of Tehran-Moscow Joint Economic Cooperation Commission Alexander Rumyantsev shortly after his arrival.

Aqazadeh and Rumyantsev held talks on mutual energy and economic cooperation including peaceful use of nuclear technology.

Aqazadeh stressed the need for completion of Bushehr atomic power plant on schedule, shipment of fuel to the power plant according to an agreement reached by the two sides and expansion of peaceful nuclear cooperation.

Stressing Tehran's resolve to continue cooperation with Russia as an important and strategic country at the international level as well as major trade partner of Iran, Aqazadeh said the new government in Iran attaches special importance to cooperation and relations with Russia.

Rumyantsev for his part called for cooperation with Tehran as Moscow's strategic ally and said Russia attaches high importance to promotion of relations with Iran in the field of energy, particularly in the nuclear energy sector.

He said that despite the ongoing technical problems, Bushehr atomic power plant will come on stream on schedule and its necessary fuel will be sent after completion of necessary technical and bureaucratic procedures.

He also called for implementation of the agreements reached in the fifth session of Tehran-Moscow Economic Cooperation Commission.

He also proposed holding the sixth meeting of the joint commission in Tehran as planned.

Aqazadeh arrived in Moscow early Monday morning.


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D.  Russia-North Korea

1.
Alexander Alexeyev:Talks on North Korea Nuclear Problem Have Never Been So Close to Agreement
Vladimir Kulikov , Interfax
9/9/2005
(for personal use only)


Alexander Alexeyev, a deputy foreign minister and head of the Russian delegation to six-nation negotiations on the North Korea nuclear problem, talks to Interfax reporter Vladimir Kulikov ahead of the resumption in Beijing on September 13 of the fourth round of the talks.

We believe that most aspects of the draft joint document that determine the shared goals and principles of the six-nation negotiations have been agreed upon. This means that the positions of the parties have never been closer. Naturally, a number of points in the joint document are the result of compromises and mutual concessions, and so a desire may arise to 'amend' the text one way or another. We wouldn't like this. It would be our preference that no 'incisions' should be made into the text, which has been agreed upon in principle.

However, there remains one fairly substantial point that stopped us bringing our work to a close in August [during the first phase of the fourth round of the six-nation talks]: and this is the issue of the scale and scope of the dismantling of the nuclear program of the PDRK [People´┐Żs Democratic Republic of Korea, official name of North Korea] and of the recognition of the right of the PDRK to continue civilian nuclear activities. The PDRK and the United States remain divided on this issue.

We expect that we will be able, nevertheless, to reach mutually acceptable solutions in the course of the fourth round.

Undoubtedly, it would be an achievement for the fourth round to approve a joint document to set clear guidelines for the negotiating parties to move forward. We believe that there exists a good chance at present to achieve such agreements, agreements whose implementation would open up the way to the status of the Korean peninsula as a region free from nuclear weapons. It would not be too farsighted from the political point of view, to say the least, to fail to take this chance.

The complex and diverse nature of the nuclear program means that it will take quite a long time to solve definitively. As it appears to us, the negotiating parties are now just at the very beginning of this path. It will be a phased movement based on the principle of assurances in response to assurances and specific moves in response to specific moves. The "road map" of specific and complex measures to turn the Korean peninsula into a nuclear-free zone is yet to be worked out.

It is a position not only of Russia but also of the PRC [People´┐Żs Republic of China] and the Republic of Korea [South Korea] that the PDRK may expect to cooperate with other countries in the field of development of its civilian nuclear power engineering if it returns into the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the Protocol on Additional Guarantees of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Any equal signatory to those international treaties and agreements has the right to develop civilian nuclear power engineering and to cooperate with other countries in this field.

The PDRK, as has been declared by its supreme leadership, has announced that it intends to return into the NPT and IAEA regimes. For this reason, after it joins the NPT regime and the IAEA Additional Protocol, the PDRK will have every reason to expect assistance from third countries in its civilian nuclear activities.

As it appears to us, this is a matter of the future, a matter that needs careful analysis and many factors, including financial, to be taken into account.

As regards Russia, we hope that the forthcoming round will produce positive results. We regard the current negotiation format as optimum and believe that opportunities for reaching agreements are far from exhausted. In our view, pessimistic speculation and proposals to the effect that the format of the negotiations should be changed or that the matter should be handed over to the UN Security Council if the fourth round proves fruitless are counterproductive.

The PDRK leader, Kim Jong Il, has been invited to visit Russia and does not conceal his intention to do so within time limits acceptable to both sides. If such a visit should take place, we would be happy to give the PDRK leader a hearty welcome.


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2.

(for personal use only)


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E.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Russia could help Vietnam develop nuclear power
RIA Novosti
9/12/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russia may contribute to creating nuclear power in Vietnam, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Alexeyev said in an article published on the ministry's official Web site.

The energy sector is a key element of Moscow's cooperation with Hanoi, Alexeyev said. The joint Russian-Vietnamese oil company Vietsovpetro accounts for more 60% of oil extraction in Vietnam. In 2004, the company extracted more than 12 million metric tons of crude.

Russia has contributed to the construction of numerous power stations in the country and is currently working on the modernization of a Vietnamese thermal power plant and the construction of a hydro-electric power station. Russian companies have also won tenders for the delivery of equipment to the Vietnamese energy industry.

Russian-Vietnamese trade turnover could exceed $1 billion this year, Alexeyev said.

There are 45 ongoing investment projects with partial Russian funding. The Russian automotive companies KamAZ and UAZ build heavy goods and off-road vehicles in Vietnam and Vietnamese airlines are using Russian Antonov aircraft. Military and technical cooperation between the two countries is also on the rise.


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2.
Russia to Build World´┐Żs First Floating Nuclear Power Station for $200,000
MosNews
9/9/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia´┐Żs Federal Nuclear Energy Agency has made a decision to build a low capacity floating nuclear power plant (FNPP), the first project of its kind in the world. The plant will be small and will produce roughly 1/150th of the power produced by a standard Russian nuclear power plant. Construction could begin in 2006 if the project finds financing.

The mini-station will be located in the White Sea, off the coast of the town of Severodvinsk (in the Arkhangelsk region in northern Russia). It will be moored near the Sevmash plant, which is the main facility of the State Nuclear Shipbuilding Center. The FNPP will be equipped with two power units using KLT-40S reactors. The plant will meet all of Sevmash´┐Żs energy requirements for just 5 or 6 cents per kilowatt. If necessary, the plant will also be able to supply heat and desalinate seawater.

"If conditions are favorable, the floating plant could be operational in four to five years´┐Ż time," said Yevgeny Kuzin, general director of the joint-stock company Malaya Energetika. By "conditions" Kuzin, who is the project leader, means funding. The small nuclear power station will cost about $200,000. Kuzin says that it will be hard to secure the necessary money. Russian businessmen have become used to making quick returns on their investments, and few are prepared to wait for long-term returns. Yet there are still some businessmen who break the mold and are aware of the benefits of taking a longer-term perspective.

And the concept of the FNPP is very promising. Small FNPPs would be a blessing for the Russian regions adjoining the Arctic Ocean. These areas lack centralized energy supplies, and an FNPP would be an independent source of energy. It is specifically this feature of the Russian technological innovation that is attracting attention abroad: Indonesia, Malaysia, and China have all shown interest in the project. The plant off the coast of Severodvinsk will therefore also act as a prototype that can be seen by potential foreign customers.

The steps for implementing FNPP project are as follows. A site for the floating power unit has to be selected in coastal waters, not far from the recipient of the power supply (be it a town, village or enterprise). The unit, which is powered by two reactors and accommodates engineering and amenity services, is then towed out to this site by a tug. The unit should be supported by compact onshore infrastructure -- transformers, pumps, heat supply units, etc. Then the plant is commissioned. It will have the capacity to supply energy to a town with a population of 200,000. If the entire capacity of the plant is switched over to desalinization of sea water, it will be able to produce 240,000 cubic meters of fresh water a day. "When the plant is decommissioned and pulled out, it leaves absolutely no pollution," Kuzin said, quoted by RIA Novosti.

Potential terrorist threats were also taken into account when designing the plant´┐Żs security system. The latest scientific and technological advances in this field have been incorporated to prevent unauthorized access to fissile materials aboard the plant. Among other things, fingerprint and iris identification technologies will be used. The plant will also be protected against possible subversive attempts by terrorist divers. Much thought has been given to protecting the plant from external factors. For example, if an airliner, even one as big as a Boeing, were to fall on the plant, there is no way it would destroy the reactor.

The project head also maintained that Russia would not sell the floating nuclear plants to other countries, should a number of them be made in the future. "Russia will only sell its products -- electric power, heat and fresh water. This means that there is no cause for concern with respect to the proliferation of nuclear technologies. A floating plant under the Russian flag would be taken up to the coasts of states that had signed the necessary agreements. It would drop anchor in a convenient place that was protected from potential natural disasters and contact local engineering services on the shore. Then it would start up its reactors and -- let there be light!" he said.

The plant will save up to 200,000 metric tons of coal and 100,000 tons of fuel oil a year. It will be fully supported by the infrastructure of the Russian nuclear industry, and will be serviced by rotating teams. The reactors will be loaded with nuclear fuel once every three years and will have a lifespan of 40 years. Every 12 years the plant will be sent home and overhauled.


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3.
Russian nuclear plants increase energy production by 3% in first two quarters of 2005
RIA Novosti
9/9/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russian Nuclear power plants (NPP) increased energy production from January-August of this year by 2.9% against the same period last year, the press-service of Rosenergoatom said Friday.

The NPPs produced a total of 94.915 billion kilowatts/hour in the first eight months of 2005 with 11.130 billion kilowatts/hour in August alone, 184 million kilowatts/hour more than had been planned.

The radiation background at the plants and neighboring territories complied with the normal exploitation of energy units and did not exceed natural figures.

Russia operates 10 nuclear power plants with 31 energy units with a total output of 23.2 gigawatts.


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F.  Official Statements

1.
Press Briefing in Advance of Trip to the UN General Assembly
Condoleezza Rice
U.S. Department of State
9/9/2005
(for personal use only)


Washington, DC

(editorial omission)

(Last) QUESTION: Do you think the EU-3 course has run -- the EU talks on Iran have run its course and will you be talking about the possibility of referring Iran's nuclear program to the UN Security Council?


SECRETARY RICE: Well, the question of whether or not the reform -- the negotiations have run their course is really one that should be put to the Iranians. The Iranians are the ones who voluntarily entered into these negotiations with the EU-3 because there were concerns in the IAEA about Iranian activities and where the world then -- the state to which we went was that there would be time given for the EU-3 to see if they could work out an arrangement with Iran that gave confidence to the international community, that it was time for Iran to -- that Iran was not intending to violate its NPT obligations.


The European 3, I think, have negotiated in good faith, they've worked very hard at it, and what they've gotten is an Iran that walked out of the agreement and started to convert UF4 to UF6. That's not an acceptable outcome. We have all said that a next step, a next step to be expected would be referral to the Security Council. I think that after the IAEA report of a couple of days ago, it's clear that Iran is not living up to its obligations and so, UN Security Council reform seems to be a reasonable option.


Now, we need leadership on this. The EU-3 led on this issue. The United States supported the EU-3 on this issue. But Iran needs to get a message from the international community that is a unified message and by this, I mean not just the EU-3 and the United States, but also Russia and China and India and others, that it is not acceptable for Iran to enter into negotiations that are aimed at restoring confidence that they are going to live up to their international obligations and then summarily walk out of them and break the agreement, that that is not acceptable.


And so, we will be working with our colleagues on this, but I think the question has been answered by a number of people, including Europeans who have said that -- you know, we're going to have to -- if the Iranians will not come back to the negotiations, if the Iranians will not go back into the Paris agreement, then not many choices are going to be left to the international community but Security Council referral.


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2.
At the beginning of the Meeting with Defence Minister Sergei Ivanov, Chief Commander of the Navy Vladimir Masorin, and Vladimir Kuroedov
Vladimir V. Putin, Acting President of the Russian Federation
Kremlin.ru: Meetings and Conferences
9/4/2005
(for personal use only)


Novo-Ogaryovo

PRESIDENT VLADIMIR PUTIN: We know what condition the fleet was in. It was not a pleasant legacy. Unfortunately, much has been lost during the 1990s.

In addition to restoring a significant part of the fleet's fighting capacity, we have created realistic programmes for its development. The last military exercises, including those where I was present, bear witness to the fleet's development. Vladimir Ivanovich [Kuroedov], this is in large part due to your work. There were unpleasant events, and even tragedies. All of us are aware of them. But I would like to emphasis once again, that the fleet is reviving.

Important tasks await Vladimir Vasilevich [Masorin], who is not new to the fleet. He knows, just as all of us know and understand, that a fleet is essential for resolving important questions related to Russia's national security, and many fundamental economic issues. Through all of its elements, including the nuclear one, the fleet is one of the basic means to guarantee the state's security.

As I have already mentioned, realistic plans for the fleet's development have recently been put forward. Many things have already been accomplished. We can already see an aircraft carrier cruiser at work, and the increasing formation of pilots of naval aircraft and seamen. Many underwater and surface vessels have been repaired, and new ones have been ordered. Some have already been received, and are presently being equipped with arms.

Along with this, I repeat that many more tasks await. I admit that corrections are possible. I would like to draw attention to what is clear for all of us, namely that ship construction and the fleet's development are very specific tasks whose construction and implementation will take place in the long-term, and thus require thorough planning. This is implies well-timed financing, and administrative and legal support.

Without a doubt, even in light of the government's improved economic situation, we cannot resolve these problems, and those of seamen's social security, if we do not increase discipline and law and order.


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G.  Items of Interest

1.
Living in a post-9/11 world
Richard G. Lugar, Senator
Indianapolis Star
9/11/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050911/OPINION/50911030..


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2.
US, Ukraine move to secure deadly pathogens
Jeremy Druker , ISN Security Watch
ISN Security Watch
9/10/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.isn.ethz.ch/news/sw/details.cfm?ID=12773


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3.
"U.S. Wants Me for My Nuclear Secrets": Press Conference with Yevgeny Adamov
Ekho Moskvy
9/9/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.mosnews.com/interview/2005/09/08/adamov.shtml


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