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Nuclear News - 11/16/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, November 16, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Submarine Dismantlement
    1. Russia, U.S. to discuss submarine disposal in Severodvinsk , Olga Vtorova, RIA Novosti (11/15/2005)
B.  Nuclear Terrorism
    1. Russia, NATO unite against terrorism , ALEXANDER SHISHLO, RIA Novosti (11/15/2005)
    2. US faulted on handling nuclear threat, detainees, Reuters (11/14/2005)
C.   G-8 Global Partnership
    1. Russia's nightmare: cocktail of chemical weapons and terrorists, Neil Buckley , Financial Times (11/15/2005)
D.  US-Russia
    1. Russia-U.S. Threat Reduction Report Due Next Month, Global Security Newswire (11/15/2005)
E.  Russia-Iran
    1. Russia to continue nuclear consultations with Iran: Ivanov , IRNA (11/16/2005)
    2. Russian nuclear talks with Iran 'useful', says Straw , IRNA (11/15/2005)
F.  Russia-North Korea
    1. North Korean nuclear talks to resume shortly - Lavrov , RIA Novosti (11/15/2005)
    2. Russia, China discuss Korea situation, Iran nuclear issue , RIA Novosti (11/15/2005)
G.  Nuclear Forces
    1. Nuke Surprise: Sergey Kirienko was switched on to atomic energy, Andrey Bagrov , Kommersant (11/16/2005)
    2. Russia to Scrap Railway-Based Missile Launcher This Week, Deploy Several New ICBMs Next Year, Global Security Newswire (11/15/2005)
    3. Russian missile commanders to hold meeting , RIA Novosti (11/15/2005)
H.   Nuclear Industry
    1. Russia sets up new military-industrial body - Ivanov , RIA Novosti (11/16/2005)
    2. Russia to help India develop nuclear submarine: Pranab , Vinay Shukla, Press Trust of India (11/16/2005)
    3. German nuke engineers to work at Kalinin N-plant., ITAR-TASS (11/14/2005)
I.  Nuclear Safety
    1. European Commission against energy imports from Russia , Olga Andrianova, RIA Novosti (11/15/2005)
    2. Exercise begins at chemical weapon storage facility in Russia's Udmurtia, BBC Monitoring (11/15/2005)
J.  Official Statements
    1. PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Meets with US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Pusan , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (11/16/2005)
    2. Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Yakovenko Answers a Media Question Regarding UN General Assembly Resolution on Chernobyl , Alexander Yakovenko, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (11/16/2005)
    3. Transcript of Remarks and Replies to Media Questions by Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Following APEC Foreign and Trade Ministers Meeting in Pusan, Republic of Korea , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (11/16/2005)
K.  Items of Interest
    1. 9/11 Commissioners Issue Third Report on Recommendations: Part III: Foreign Policy, Public Diplomacy, and Nonproliferation, Thomas H. Kean, Chair, 9/11 Public Discourse Project (11/14/2005)
    2. General Assembly Calls for Further Strengthening United Nations Humanitarian Capacity to Assist Millions of Disaster Victims Worldwide (Re: Chernobyl), U.N. General Assembly (11/14/2005)



A.  Submarine Dismantlement

1.
Russia, U.S. to discuss submarine disposal in Severodvinsk
Olga Vtorova
RIA Novosti
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


ST. PETERSBURG--Russian shipyard Sevmash and a U.S. task force will discuss the disposal of nuclear submarines in the Russian arctic city of Severodvinsk under the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (CTR), Sevmash said Tuesday.

The parties will discuss the disposal of two Project 941 Akula (Typhoon) attack nuclear submarines and the production of transportation package containers for spent nuclear fuel, Sevmash said.

Sevmash has recently completed the disposal of the first Akula submarine, the world's largest nuclear powered naval vessel, under the CTR program.

There is an agreement with the U.S. on the disposal of another Akula submarine, which is already in the dockyard of Sevmash, the company said. The parties are also expected to discuss the disposal of yet another submarine in the Russian Northern Fleet.

The Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program stipulates assistance to former Soviet republics to eliminate weapons of mass destruction under the START-I strategic arms reduction treaty.


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B.  Nuclear Terrorism

1.
Russia, NATO unite against terrorism
ALEXANDER SHISHLO
RIA Novosti
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


BRUSSELS -- The Chief of the Russian General Staff said Tuesday that Russia's Black Sea Fleet would participate in naval operations in the Mediterranean Sea within the framework of NATO's Operation Active Endeavour, designed to boost the fight against terrorism.

General of the Army Yury Baluyevsky, who is heading the Russian delegation at the Russia-NATO Council in the Bulgium capital, told a news conference that Russia would join the operation next year with two naval ships, but added that Russia reserved the right to withdraw if necessary.

Baluyevsky said the meeting had approved a joint plan for 2006, including 42 events aimed at enhancing the interoperability of the Russian and NATO forces.

However, Baluyevsky said NATO officials had not shown interest in cooperation with the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), a confederation of former Soviet states that was recognized by the United Nations as a regional structure capable of addressing current threats and challenges.

He said the CSTO, which also comprises Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan, had significant experience in fighting terrorist groups and had compiled a large database on terrorists.

Baluyevsky said Russia has been pursuing the principle of broad international cooperation on the fight against terrorism, including with NATO and the European Union, and that the international community should use the resources and capabilities of the CSTO.



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2.
US faulted on handling nuclear threat, detainees
Reuters
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON - The U.S. government is still failing to adequately protect nuclear weapons from terrorists and its handling of terrorism suspects is undermining attempts to improve America's image in the Muslim world, members of a commission that investigated the Sept. 11 attacks said on Monday.

Although President George W. Bush has called weapons proliferation the country's most serious threat and al Qaeda has sought nuclear arms for a decade, "the most striking thing to us is that the size of the problem still totally dwarfs the policy response," said commission chairman Thomas Kean.

"In short, we still do not have a maximum effort against the most urgent threat -- everybody agrees -- the most urgent threat to the American people," he told a news conference.

The commission was established by the U.S. Congress to investigate the Sept 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon by Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda network that killed nearly 3,000 people.

Sixteen months ago, it issued a huge report that included scores of recommendations. Monday's report assessed the progress on proliferation, foreign policy and public diplomacy issues.

It formally disbanded after submitting its final report in July last year, but the members continue their work as the 9/11 Public Discourse Project, which tracks implementation of the 2004 report's recommendations.

Vice chairman Lee Hamilton said distrust of America remains high in the Muslim world and that "detainee abuse in Abu Ghraib (prison in Iraq), Guantanamo and elsewhere undermines America's reputation as a moral leader."

He said the commission reaffirmed its recommendation for a "common coalition approach toward the detention and humane treatment of captured terrorists, drawing upon Article 3 of the Geneva Convention," but the U.S. government has not adopted this proposal.



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C.   G-8 Global Partnership

1.
Russia's nightmare: cocktail of chemical weapons and terrorists
Neil Buckley
Financial Times
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


In a school lecture theatre in the western Siberian village of Planovy, Colonel Sergei Lotansky points to a display of empty chemical weapons shells. Even the smallest, barely bigger than a wine bottle, could contain 440g of nerve agent - enough to kill several thousand people.

Col. Lotansky is chief engineer at the nearby Shchuchye military base where, in 14 large storerooms, nearly 2m active shells are stacked on wooden racks.

They contain 5,400 tonnes of sarin, soman and VX nerve gas - theoretically sufficient, divided into individual doses, to wipe out the world's population many times over. In an age of terrorism aimed at mass slaughter, these shells give security experts as many nightmares as nuclear weapons.

Chemical shells are small, easy to transport and set off, and millions exist. Shchuchye is one of seven stockpiles in Russia that hold 40,000 tonnes of chemical agent, the world's biggest arsenal, though some contain bigger weapons or spray tanks. Shchuchye's particular vulnerability, thanks to the portability of its shells, makes it the centrepiece of an international, multi-billion dollar programme to build destruction facilities at each site. It is also a case study of the difficulties that have dogged the programme - and not been entirely overcome.

The US has spent $10m (�8.5m, �6m) on beefing up security at the Shchuchye base. Nearly $2bn, from donors including the UK, Canada, Italy, Switzerland, Russia and, above all, the US, is going into a vast destruction plant 15km away. The plant was due to be operating by now, but the start of construction was delayed by Russian money shortages and bureaucratic foot-dragging, and a three-year delay getting US Congress to approve funding.

Today, at last, two hangar-like structures are rising from a clearing in a birch forest, teeming with men in hard hats and echoing with concrete mixers and drills.

If all now goes to plan, from 2008 trainloads of shells will arrive here from the stockpile on a specially-built rail line. The nerve agent will be removed, broken into constituent ingredients, then combined irreversibly with bitumen. At full capacity, the plant should be capable of destroying Shchuchye's stockpile in just over three years, in time for the 2012 deadline Russia is committed to under the 1997 Chemical Weapons Convention.

Colonel General Victor Kholstov, deputy director of Russia's Federal Agency for Industry, who oversees the project, insists it is on track.

"We revised our construction plans in 2004 and I will say that our goal of starting operations by the middle of 2008 is realistic," he says.

Adam Ingram, UK armed forces minister, recently visited Shchuchye to see how Britain had spent �15m ($26m, �22m) on providing water and electricity supplies to the site - out of a pledged $100m to help Russian chemical weapons destruction. He praised the "substantial progress".

"There are evil forces out there who are only too intent on getting their hands on such materials, and we have got to stop that happening," he said.

But are international donors overlooking another threat to the project? Drive around the ramshackle wooden houses and crumbling low-rise apartments of Shchuchye and its surrounding villages, and it is clear the oil wealth transforming Russia's big cities has not reached here.

The taint of being situated next to thousands of tonnes of nerve gas has almost wiped out its agriculture and food processing industry.

A report in September by Green Cross International, an environmental group that monitors weapons destruction, found the unemployment rate at 43 per cent among the Shchuchye area's 29,000 inhabitants.

In nine out of 10 households, per capita income was below the official subsistence level of $77 a month; less than a third had running water. With half its roads unpaved, and hospitals underequipped and understaffed, the area was dangerously unprepared for an emergency. The report warned that disgruntled residents might resort to holding up construction of the destruction plant through sabotage or demonstrations - or worse.

"Impoverished residents might be driven to compromise the security of the nerve agent stockpile or . . . destruction facility - for the right price - through collusion with terrorist groups," it said.

Britain's Ministry of Defence believes the threat is exaggerated. It is Russia's responsibility to upgrade local infrastructure, which it claims it is doing. Ridding it of the chemical weapons taint would itself help to regenerate Shchuchye's economy. Galina Vepreva, who runs Shchuchye's information centre on chemical disarmament, says the town has already seen some benefit. Russia is committed to devoting 10 per cent of the cost of weapons destruction facilities to local infrastructure upgrades.

But Ms. Vepreva fears more spending is needed to avoid Green Cross scenarios coming true.


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D.  US-Russia

1.
Russia-U.S. Threat Reduction Report Due Next Month
Global Security Newswire
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


A U.S.-Russian nuclear threat reduction working group is scheduled to issue a report to the countries� leaders on Dec. 15, U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency Director Alexander Rumyantsev announced Wednesday.

Presidents Vladimir Putin and George W. Bush established the Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiative in February. A bilateral senior interagency working group was also created and charged with reporting on the status of cooperation on securing nuclear materials in Russia and other nations.

The upcoming report is the second from the working group. It is set to cover progress in security efforts and planned initiatives, according to the Energy Department (U.S. Energy Department release, Nov. 9).


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E.  Russia-Iran

1.
Russia to continue nuclear consultations with Iran: Ivanov
IRNA
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


Tehran--Russian Security Council Secretary Igor Ivanov on Wednesday said his country would continue consultations with Iran on its nuclear programs.

In an interview with Itar-Tass and RIA-Novosti news agencies, Ivanov said during his recent visit to Iran, the two sides discussed regional issues including Iran's nuclear programs.

Russia believes Iran, like other member countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and based on the country's commitments, is entitled to expand its nuclear program.

He voiced his country's opposition to access of non-nuclear countries to nuclear weapons, saying such an issue may leave serious impacts on regional and international security.

He urged continuation of nuclear talks between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Union troika to remove possible concerns.

Ivanov voiced Russia's willingness to expand ties with Iran, saying Iran is Russia's old neighbor and partner.

Iran and Russia enjoy great potential for constructive cooperation, he further stated.



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2.
Russian nuclear talks with Iran 'useful', says Straw
IRNA
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


London--Foreign Secretary Jack Straw indicated Tuesday that some progress may have been made in Russia's nuclear talks with Iran.

"I had reports and think they were useful but not conclusive," Straw told London-based Middle East journalists at a briefing, dominated by Iraq and Syria.

Igor Ivanov, secretary of the Russian Security Council, held weekend talks with Iran, where he was reportedly proposing a compromise plan that will permit Iran to continue uranium conversion at its Isfahan plant.

Straw said that he had discussions with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov about Ivanov's visit, when he was in Moscow last week with an EU Foreign Minister's Trokia delegation.

"We are very anxious to cooperate fully with the Russian Federation on Iran's dossier," he said without specifying whether the proposal signified a shift in the EU's demand for Iran to suspend its uranium enrichment program.

The offer, which reportedly recognizes Iran's right to nuclear technology, is said to have made a key concession of allowing Iran to develop an early part of the fuel cycle.

It also provides safeguards against the diversion of materials for any weapons program by stipulating that all uranium enrichment be carried out on Russian territory at a plant to be built and jointly owned with Iran.

The UK has not ruled out the compromise proposal.

A Foreign Office spokesman told IRNA last week that it was 'technically complicated and would require detailed international consideration'.

Straw made no mention of whether the offer meant that the EU may be prepared to restart negotiations with Iran on the basis of allowing uranium conversion work at Isfahan.

He said that EU discussions were focused on what will be said and reported at next week's board meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Last month, Britain's Ambassador to Tehran Richard Dalton told IRNA that the EU could be planning to advance its original offer made to Iran to break the deadlock in negotiations with Iran.

"We think that the proposal that EU put forward can be certainly improved and the proposal (the Iranian President) His Excellency Mr Ahmadinejad made in New York can clearly go on to the table," Dalton said.


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F.  Russia-North Korea

1.
North Korean nuclear talks to resume shortly - Lavrov
RIA Novosti
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


BUSAN - The fifth round of six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear weapons program will resume shortly, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Tuesday.

"The fifth-round of negotiations will resume after a short break. Their main objective will be to find ways to implement the fundamental agreements reached during the fourth round," Lavrov told reporters after a meeting with his South Korean counterpart on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum.

The latest round of North Korean disarmament talks, involving the two Koreas, China, Japan, Russia and the United States, ended inconclusively last week with the North proposing a five-step plan to abandon its nuclear weapons program. It said it would halt its nuclear tests, dismantle its nuclear facilities and eventually rejoin the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, but only after receiving concessions from the United States.


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2.
Russia, China discuss Korea situation, Iran nuclear issue
RIA Novosti
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


BUSAN - The foreign ministers of Russia and China met at an APEC gathering in the South Korean city of Busan to discuss the North Korean nuclear problem, the Middle East peace process, the situation in Syria and the Iran nuclear issue, the Russian delegation said Tuesday.

Russia's Sergei Lavrov and China's Li Zhaoxing "exchanged opinions on the most topical and important issues of the agenda, including closer integration within APEC and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization," the source said.


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G.  Nuclear Forces

1.
Nuke Surprise: Sergey Kirienko was switched on to atomic energy
Andrey Bagrov
Kommersant
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


Sergey Kirienko has been appointed the head of the Federal Atomic Energy Agency yesterday. The former Russian prime minister and presidential envoy to the Volga Federal District will have to reform the country's nuclear industry. Alexander Rumyantsev, who failed at this job, will be sent as the Russian Ambassador to a European country.

Sergey Kirienko asked the Kremlin long ago to transfer him to a position in the energy industry, according to the information of Kommersant. He ended up with the Russian nuke agency responsible for the industry that annually reaps over $3.5 billion revenues from exports of hi-tech products and services [see the article below]. Yet, the atomic industry has been long waiting for comprehensive reforms.

The reform proceeding in the traditional energy industry, the Rosenergoatom concern will not only turn into a stock company. Its out-dated and complicated tariff-shaping system (which, for example, does not consider an investment component), which makes it impossible for the industry to compete with RAO UES of Russia (though the atomic energy is the second-cheapest, after the hydro energy), will be also drastically reorganized. On top of it, the reputation of the Russian nuke industry has been bruised on the international arena. Russian lost a tender to construct a nuclear power station in Finland, even though one of the two Finnish stations was built by Russian technologies. The launch of the first two power units of the Tianwan nuclear power station in China is also suspended.

The atomic energy industry in this country is also developing not at its full capacity. Decision to complete the constructions of atomic stations have been made with reluctance, while the financing of the designing of the VVER enhanced reactor with the capacity of 1,500 mWt (Russia is currently building reactors of 1,000 mWt) also has not been adequately promoted.

Alexander Rumyantsev, who has headed the industry for four years, acted too warily and was unwilling to confront members of the Russian Cabinet with the issues of funding. His colleagues in the Government were no less surprised than his employees that he had never asked for extra money from the Finance Ministry to shore up the industry.

Alternativley, Rumyantsev�s exceptional tact helped him establish with relations with foreign counterparts. He contributed a lot to the intensification of the Russian-U.S. dialog in the atomic industry. That is why President Putin let Rumyantsev celebrate at this post his 60th anniversary this June and the 60th anniversary of the atomic industry early September. It is possible that another role of Sergey Kirienko influenced this appointment as the new head of the Russian Atomic Energy Agency. The fact is that while representing the Russian president in the Volga federal district he has also headed the Russian State Commission on the Chemical Disarmament since 2001 and he managed to give a momentum to the issue of the destruction of chemical weapons.

Once appointed, Sergey Kirienko will speed up the conversion of Rosenergoatom into a stock company. It will take not only amending the law on the atomic energy that bans introducing any changes in the structure of the federal unitary enterprise (even making it a 100-percent-state-owned joint-stock company) but he will also need political will to stand for these amendments at the State Duma. Besides that, the investment program of Rosenergoatom and other enterprises under the agency, research institutes, for example, will be reconsidered. New employees also wait for Kirienko to display political will.

"We are professionals, and we can work under any manager. But when the minister or the head of the atomic agency has nothing to do with the industry--we haven�t seen that since the time of Beriya, a far-sighted politician, who was appointed the head of the newborn Soviet atomic project. So the history has just made a funny circle--a politician will run the atomic energy again," an employee at the Russian Atomic Energy Agency commented to Kommersant yesterday. Andrey Malyshev, the acting head of the Federal Atomic, Ecologic and Technology Supervision Service and former deputy atomic energy minister, welcomed the appointment of Kirienko. "Considering his potential, I think he will have a resource of confidence in the industry in carrying out reforms."

Rumyantsev is believed to be soon sent to a diplomatic job. He may be appointed the Russian Ambassador to Hungary or Denmark. The Russian embassy to Denmark is how headed by Dmitry Ryurikov, 58-year-old professional functionary and former aide to President Yeltsin. The Embassy to Hungary is run by Valery Musatov, 64, career diplomat.

Kirienko will be officially introduced to the employees of the Atomic Energy Agency tomorrow.


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2.
Russia to Scrap Railway-Based Missile Launcher This Week, Deploy Several New ICBMs Next Year
Global Security Newswire
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia yesterday initiated the disposal of one final railway-based missile launcher for the year, Interfax reported.

"It is this year�s ninth railway-based missile launcher. Its cannibalization is to be over before the end of the week," a military spokesman told Interfax.

A U.S. inspection team is observing the disposal, as mandated by the START 1 treaty, he said (Interfax I/BBC Monitoring, Nov. 14).

Meanwhile, Strategic Missile Troops Commander Col.-Gen. Nikolai Solovtsov yesterday said that Moscow plans to expand its missile arsenal, RIA Novosti reported.

"The state arms program envisages the number of launching sites and missiles provided by the (defense) industry to be raised by 10, 12, or 15," Solovtsov said. Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said earlier that he expected six new ICBMs to be deployed next year, according to RIA Novosti.

"The main problem now is the funds needed for capital development," Solovtsov said. "Introducing silo-based and mobile systems requires a lot of investment. This is a serious problem" (RIA Novosti, Nov. 14).

Solovtsov also said yesterday that Topol-M missile units would be equipped with new warheads that are being tested, Interfax reported.

"In [the] future, the missile forces will have only two types of missile units, the silo-based and vehicle-based Topol-M, on which all newly tested weapons will be mounted," he said (Interfax II/BBC Monitoring, Nov. 14).


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3.
Russian missile commanders to hold meeting
RIA Novosti
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - An extended meeting of the Russian Strategic Missile Forces (RSMF) Military Council will be held in the village of Vlasikha near Moscow, a defense ministry official said Tuesday.

"During the RSMF operative training session on November 15-18, an extended meeting of the RSMF Military Council will be held," the official said. "The participants will review the results of combat training in 2005, discuss the improvements of command-and-control methods and set goals for 2006."

RSMF Commander Colonel General Nikolai Solovtsov is supervising the operative training session.


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H.   Nuclear Industry

1.
Russia sets up new military-industrial body - Ivanov
RIA Novosti
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - A special body will be set up to tackle military-industrial issues on the basis of existing government departments, Russian Deputy Prime Minister and Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said Wednesday.

"This is the establishment of a permanent body that will help me fulfill my functions [of deputy prime minister]," said Ivanov, who was appointed to this post Monday.

He said the coordination of the military-industrial commission's work would be one of his key functions.

Ivanov said he would not increase the number of bureaucrats in the government.


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2.
Russia to help India develop nuclear submarine: Pranab
Vinay Shukla
Press Trust of India
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia has agreed to help India in developing indigenous nuclear-powered submarine and aircraft carriers, while India is ready for joint development of a fifth-generation fighter aircraft, Defence Minister Pranab Mukherjee here today.

The issue of vessels were discussed and Russia has agreed to provide all possible help and the advanced technology available with it, Mukherjee said after talks with his his Russian counterpart Sergei Ivanov.

"For some components joint ventures and joint production would be set up," he told PTI when asked if Russian cooperation in the development of Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) and Air Defence Ship (ADS) projects was discussed with Russian Defence Minister.

ATV is an indigenous project for the development of nuclear submarine and ADS project is for the development of aircraft carriers.

Speaking at a joint press conference, Mukherjee said India will take part in the development and financing of a fifth generation super fighter aircraft project with Russia.

"We exchanged views. Active contacts are going on with Russian side. Our air force is in contact with their Russian counterpart, HAL and Sukhoi Corporation are talking on manufacturing aspects.

"We are keen on taking part in the development and financing of the fifth generation fighter," Mukherjee said.

He also announced that Russia's Defence Ministry has agreed to provide access to the Russian GLONASS global navigational satellite system for military application to India, an alternative to Pentagon-controlled US Global Positioning System (GPS).

The two ministers earlier signed the protocol of the fifth session of Indo-Russian Intergovernmental Commission on Military-Technical Cooperation (IRIGC-MTC) as its co-chairmen.

Mukherjee also announced that the vexed issue of IPR has been resolved and the agreement will be signed during Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's Moscow visit next month.

Ivanov said the signing of IPR agreement will open new vistas for cooperation in most sensitive futuristic technologies.

He underscored that India is the "sole" country in the world with which Moscow has a long-term defence cooperation programme and has opened its whole military industrial complex for the Indian defence complex.

"This is because of highest level trust and shared national security interests in Eurasia and the whole world," Ivanov pointed out, mentioning India as an emerging economic and military power on the global scale, friendly to Russia and the largest democracy.

Later, the Defence Minister was welcomed in the Kremlin by Russian President Vladimir Putin, who noted "high level of trust" in bilateral defence cooperation and reiterated Moscow's readiness to further expand military ties with New Delhi.

"It is very significant that interaction between our defence departments are developing in the best way and military-technical cooperation is developing most intensively in the high level of trust," Putin said.

He underscored that political ties between the two countries have acquired "unprecedentdly" high level.

Putin lauded the recent Indo-Russian anti-terror wargames Indra-2005 in India in October involving paratroopers and naval ships of the two nations.

More such drills are being planned in the future, he said.


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3.
German nuke engineers to work at Kalinin N-plant.
ITAR-TASS
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Nuclear engineers from Germany�s Brokdorf nuclear power plant have arrived to the newest power-generating unit of the Kalinin nuclear plant, a source at the Rosenergoatom concern told Itar-Tass on Monday.

Russian and German nuclear engineers will exchange experience in servicing power-generating units under the Twinning program for cooperation of twin nuclear power plants, specialist of the Kalinin plant international cooperation department Inna Avtomonova said.

German specialists will visit the third unit of the Kalinin nuclear power plant that was commissioned recently.

"Our German guests, who have not built new power-generating units for a long while, will be able to work a one-day shift and fulfill all technological operations, including a go-around of supervised area," a source at the Kalinin plant said.

The Kalinin nuclear power plant and Brokdorf signed their first cooperation agreement in 2000. In 2004, twin plants sealed a new deal with a five-year maturity.


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I.  Nuclear Safety

1.
European Commission against energy imports from Russia
Olga Andrianova
RIA Novosti
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


HELSINKI - The European Commission will not import energy from Russia until security in the country's nuclear power sphere is heightened, a commission representative told an energy forum in the capital of Finland.

Jean-Claude Schwartz said Russia should firstly shut down dangerous reactors. He added that Russia's share in European energy imports was 2% and was unlikely to increase by 2020.

At the same time, Schwartz noted that Russia's share in European oil imports was almost 33%, and in natural gas imports, about 50%.

Unlike the EU, Finland is more dependent on Russian energy, which constitutes 14% of all power consumed in Finland.



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2.
Exercise begins at chemical weapon storage facility in Russia's Udmurtia
BBC Monitoring
11/15/2005
(for personal use only)


A command-post exercise today began at the chemical weapon storage facility in Kambarka (Udmurtia).

According to the head of the regional information and analysis centre under the republic's Ministry of Natural Resources, German Frizorger, subunits of the Emergencies Ministry, the Interior Ministry, the Federal Security Service and the federal department for safe storage and destruction of chemical weapons are involved in the manoeuvres. Local government bodies are also involved in the exercise.

The objective of the exercise is to practise collaboration of the executive authorities and military command in the event of a threat of a terrorist act at a chemical facility. The scenario envisages seizing the terrorist group, liquidating hotbeds of fire, rescuing people affected by the accident, evacuating the population and rendering first aid.

The arsenal in Kambarka, which is Russia's second largest arsenal, contains over 6,300 tonnes of lewisite. The facility for the destruction of this agent was included as a matter of priority in the plan for the implementation of the second stage of the relevant nationwide programme. A total of R2.8bn has been allocated for the construction of this facility (which is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2006).


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J.  Official Statements

1.
PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Meets with US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Pusan
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


On November 16, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov had a working meeting with Secretary of State of the United States of America Condoleezza Rice on the sidelines of the APEC Forum in Pusan, Republic of Korea.
Topical aspects of the international situation and of engagement between Russia and the United States in regional affairs, including settlement in Iraq and the Middle East as well as in the field of nonproliferation, were discussed. A number of issues in Russian-American relations also were examined in the context of an upcoming meeting of the Russian and US Presidents in Pusan.


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2.
Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Yakovenko Answers a Media Question Regarding UN General Assembly Resolution on Chernobyl
Alexander Yakovenko
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


Question: How could you comment upon the Chernobyl resolution which was adopted on November 14 by consensus by the UN General Assembly?
Answer: The resolution on Chernobyl acknowledges the efforts of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine in dealing with the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster effectively, and orients the international community towards continuing assistance to them for these purposes. It was stressed that the UN continues to play an important coordinating role in strengthening engagement on Chernobyl issues at the international level, with the main emphasis laid on programs for the rehabilitation and development of the affected territories.

The resolution notes the role of the CIS in the preparation of the commemorative events for the 20th anniversary of the tragedy. The 26th of April has been declared Day in Memory of the Victims of Radiation Accidents and Disasters in this context. It is also decided to convene in April 2006 a special meeting of the General Assembly in connection with the 20th anniversary of Chernobyl. The number of cosponsors of the resolution totaled 69, including all CIS members.

The resolution stated the necessity of implementing the Shelter Project, which is designed to ensure the radiation safety of the wrecked Chernobyl power unit for the long term. The Russian side also participates in the implementation of this program.


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3.
Transcript of Remarks and Replies to Media Questions by Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Following APEC Foreign and Trade Ministers Meeting in Pusan, Republic of Korea
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
11/16/2005
(for personal use only)


Foreign Minister Lavrov: The Ministerial Meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum has considered a package of documents intended for approval at the APEC summit, which will be held here, in Pusan, on November 18-19. Russian President Vladimir Putin will take part in it. The documents encompass every area of activity of the Organization, extending both to trade and economic issues (they lay at the base of the creation of this association) and to issues of combating new challenges and threats. A whole variety of concrete decisions has been adopted to intensify and concretize the struggle against international terrorism. Apart from the condemnation of terrorist acts in principle, which have recently affected many countries of this region as well, the ministers are submitting for approval by the Presidents a number of specific concrete projects associated with the ensuring of security in all forms of transport and at transport terminals.

For the future, Russia suggests considering organizing a unified navigation safety information system. Questions of combating organized crime and contraband of weapons of mass destruction are also increasingly in the APEC field of vision.

***EDITED***

Question: The North Korean problem was discussed at your meeting with the Foreign Minister of the Republic of Korea, Ban Ki-moon. Does South Korea share the position of Russia?

Foreign Minister Lavrov: We concur in our views on the North Korean nuclear problem. We briefly stated that the meeting that had been held and commenced a fifth round of six-party talks was very useful. After a small interval, fifth-round talks will be resumed. Their task is to find joint ways of carrying out the agreements in principle that were reached in the framework of the fourth round.

Question: Will Russia supply North Korea with electricity as part of the process of the six-party talks?

Foreign Minister Lavrov: The six-party talks do not involve Russia's supply of electricity to anybody, but concern the finding of an acceptable solution to the North Korean problem. We all want a denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and the finding of legitimate ways to solve the North Korean nuclear problem which will satisfy North Korea and be recognized by it. Russia jointly with other participants, including South Korea, Japan and the United States, is ready to assist this process.


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K.  Items of Interest

1.
9/11 Commissioners Issue Third Report on Recommendations: Part III: Foreign Policy, Public Diplomacy, and Nonproliferation
Thomas H. Kean, Chair
9/11 Public Discourse Project
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.9-11pdp.org/press/2005-11-14_report.pdf


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2.
General Assembly Calls for Further Strengthening United Nations Humanitarian Capacity to Assist Millions of Disaster Victims Worldwide (Re: Chernobyl)
U.N. General Assembly
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2005/ga10420.doc.htm


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