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Nuclear News - 11/14/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, November 14, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Submarine Dismantlement
    1. Japan Pays To Demolish Five Russian Subs , AFP (11/14/2005)
B.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy
    1. NATO report warns Russian biological agents could fall into hands of terrorists print , Associated Press (11/13/2005)
C.  Russia-Iran
    1. Iran faces more heat to agree atomic deal, Gareth Smyth and Dan Dombey , Financial Times (11/13/2005)
    2. Iran�s Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant 80% Completed � Russian Security Chief, MosNews (11/13/2005)
    3. Russia believes Iranian nuke issue dialogue not exhausted-Ivanov, ITAR-TASS (11/13/2005)
    4. Russia denies Iran nuclear deal , BBC News (11/12/2005)
    5. Bushehr power station to be implemented: Moscow , IRNA (11/10/2005)
    6. Russia proposes compromise over Iranian uranium plant, Guy Dinmore, Daniel Dombey, Roula Khalaf And Gareth Smyth, Financial Times (11/10/2005)
D.  Russia-North Korea
    1. No nuclear contacts with N. Korea for 10 years - Russian official , Alexei Berezin, RIA Novosti (11/10/2005)
E.  Nuclear Forces
    1. Russia to equip Topol-M systems with new warheads , RIA Novosti (11/14/2005)
    2. Russia to order more strategic missiles , RIA Novosti (11/14/2005)
    3. URGENT: Defense Minister to retain post, be appointed deputy PM - Putin , RIA Novosti (11/14/2005)
F.  Official Statements
    1. PRESS RELEASE: On the Results of the First Session of the Fifth Round of Six-Party Talks on the Resolution of the Korean Peninsula Nuclear Issue, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (11/11/2005)
    2. Briefing En Route Shannon, Ireland, Condoleezza Rice, U.S. Department of State (11/10/2005)
    3. Nuclear Proliferation Cited as Top Security Concern; Policymakers discuss ways to prevent spread of nuclear weapons, Ryan Callanan, Washington File: U.S. Department of State (11/10/2005)
    4. State Department Official Touts Nonproliferation Policy; Joseph says one aspect was development of national strategy for WMD, U.S. Department of State/Bureau of International Information Programs (11/10/2005)
    5. Secretary Bodman, Director Rumyantsev Issue Joint Statement on Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiatives, U.S. Department of Energy (11/9/2005)
G.  Items of Interest
    1. Change of the Guard Raising Alarm Bells: As the Nuclear Workforce Ages, Concerns Rise About Preserving Knowledge, IAEA (11/11/2005)
    2. NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION: IAEA Has Strengthened Its Safeguards and Nuclear Security Programs, but Weaknesses Need to Be Addressed, GAO (10/7/2005)



A.  Submarine Dismantlement

1.
Japan Pays To Demolish Five Russian Subs
AFP
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)


TOKYO--The Japanese government will shoulder the expense of dismantling five abandoned Russian nuclear submarines that are likely to leak radiation, a news report said Nov. 13.

Tokyo and Moscow will finalize the agreement on Nov. 21, when Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi will meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin, the Nihon Keizai Shimbun newspaper said, citing unnamed sources.

Japan already spent about 700 million yen ($5.9 million) to demolish an obsolete Russian submarine last December.

Japan will likely pay a similar amount for each of the five, whose demolition work is aimed for the end of next year, the paper said.

Some 30 nuclear submarines that have been retired from Russia�s Pacific Fleet are still moored at ports in the Far East.

Since the collapse of the former Soviet Union, concern has been spreading that the country�s sinking of old submarines will contaminate the ocean.

Another concern is that nuclear materials on board will be stolen.

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B.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy

1.
NATO report warns Russian biological agents could fall into hands of terrorists print
Associated Press
11/13/2005
(for personal use only)


COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- Deadly biological agents being stored at poorly guarded facilities in Russia are at risk of falling into the hands of terrorists, according to a report presented to NATO lawmakers Sunday.

Preventing terror groups from acquiring the pathogens is probably the main security challenge to the Euro-Atlantic community, said the report presented to the science committee of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly meeting in Copenhagen.

The report said the biological agents were being stored at former Soviet facilities that lack modern security and could easily be burglarized. The facilities were not officially part of the Soviet biological weapons complex, but belonged to a clandestine weapons program and are therefore ineligible for aid from Western governments, the report said.

Canadian General Rapporteur, Sen. Pierre Claude Nolin, criticized the "paltry spending" on preventing the spread of such biological weapons.

Also Sunday, Hikmet Cetin, NATO's most senior civilian representative in Afghanistan, called for an increased commitment to the country by alliance member states.

"Reform is occurring because we, NATO, the nations present here are present in Afghanistan," said the former Turkish minister to the Assembly's Defense and Security Committee. "Progress and reform will continue, if we press forward ... it will collapse if we stall, or worse yet, withdraw."

The meeting will end with a plenary session on Tuesday, when Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and NATO Secretary-General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer will address delegates.

The event, which brings together parliamentarians from the 26 NATO member countries as well as 13 associated members to discuss security issues, will conclude the assembly's 50th anniversary year.


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C.  Russia-Iran

1.
Iran faces more heat to agree atomic deal
Gareth Smyth and Dan Dombey
Financial Times
11/13/2005
(for personal use only)


TEHRAN and BRUSSELS--Diplomatic activity over Tehran�s controversial nuc�lear programme is set to intensify this week in the run-up to the board meeting on November 24 of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which may debate referring Iran to the United Nations Security Council for possible sanctions.

During a weekend visit to Tehran by Igor Ivanov, Russia�s top security official, Iranian officials gave no clear reaction to a compromise proposal from Moscow to move the most sensitive part of Iran�s programme--uranium enrichment--on to Russian soil.

"If a proposal is presented that can facilitate the issue, it could be considered," Ali Larijani, secretary of Iran�s Supreme National Security Council, said on Saturday. Iranian media reported that Russian officials who accompanied Mr Ivanov would remain in Tehran "for a few more days."

There also has been speculation in Vienna that Mohamed El Baradei, the IAEA director-general, will visit Tehran in the coming days in an attempt to enc�ourage Iran to sign a compromise backed by both the European Union and US.

Any rejection by Tehran of Russia�s proposals is likely to be seen by the EU, which has led talks with Tehran over its nuclear programme, as bolstering the case for a UN referral. But the EU3 is hesitant on referral, which it sees as the last resort.

Manmohan Singh, India�s prime minister, said on Sunday that he would prefer the IAEA meeting to reach a consensus. "If it comes to [a] vote, I can�t predict what we will do," he said.

Mr Singh has faced domestic criticism since India voted in September with the US, Britain, France and Germany for an IAEA resolution finding Iran in "non-compliance" with the nuclear non-proliferation treaty.

Many European diplomats sympathise with the point of view of those close to Mr El Baradei that the most pressing need is for Iran to continue its suspension of uranium enrichment, undertaken as a goodwill gesture during two-year negotiations with the EU. Some diplomats fear hasty referral to the Security Council could prompt Tehran to resume enrichment.

Many European diplomats privately had doubted Iran would accept the Russian proposal but argue that diplomacy should be kept active for want of options.

Iran�s foreign ministry spokesman on Sunday dismissed a New York Times report that US officials gained access through a stolen laptop to Iranian designs for a warhead suitable for a nuclear device. "It is another fuss ahead of the IAEA board meeting to poison the atmosphere," said Hamid-Reza Asefi. "The baseless claim made us laugh. We do not use laptops to keep our classified documents."


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2.
Iran�s Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant 80% Completed � Russian Security Chief
MosNews
11/13/2005
(for personal use only)


The work to construct the Bushehr nuclear power plant in Iran has been over 80 percent completed, Secretary of the Russian Security Council Igor Ivanov said during his three-day visit to Teheran in an interview with Itar-Tass.

According to Ivanov, the Russian specialists are actively working at the facility. The Iranian side does not hide it is interested in totally completing the building work in the coming months.

Meanwhile, the new Iranian leadership has confirmed the continuity of the policy to develop good neighborly relations with Russia. In the course of the sides discussed a wide spectrum of the two countries� interaction both at the bilateral and regional levels. In the opinion of the Russian Security Council secretary, Russia and Iran have good prospects for expanding interaction not only in the atomic power industry, but also in the military-technical cooperation sphere.

Speaking about cooperation at the regional level Ivanov pointed out Russia has supported the Iranian request to be allowed to take part in the work of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) as an observer.

"We believe this participation is useful in view of the fact that we have specific interests as regards regional cooperation with Iran, which for its part also takes an interest in the expansion of cooperation of this kind," Ivanov stressed.

The Security Council secretary went on to say that Russia believes that the possibilities of the dialogue on the Iranian nuclear problem are not exhausted yet and is ready to assist the resumption of the negotiations between Iran and the European Troika.


"Russia is coming out for solving all the questions emerging in connection with this problem by way of a dialogue, though active interaction with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)," Ivanov said.

"We believe it would be useful to resume the dialogue in the previous format and we have not put forward any alternative formats and proposals," Ivanov said. "We exchange views with Iran and with our partners in the IAEA in order to reveal the possibilities that Russia could use for easing tension."

"The negotiating process should be continued for the sake of removing the remaining obstacles and for purposes of continuing cooperation in the implementation of nuclear programmes for peaceful purposes," he added.

Ivanov pointed out that in the course of his visit to Teheran the two sides did not discuss any specific Russian proposals as regards the Iranian nuclear problem settlement.


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3.
Russia believes Iranian nuke issue dialogue not exhausted-Ivanov
ITAR-TASS
11/13/2005
(for personal use only)


TEHERAN - Russia believes that the possibilities of the dialogue on the Iranian nuclear problem are not exhausted yet and is ready to assist the resumption of the negotiations between Iran and the European Troika, Secretary of the Russian Security Council Igor Ivanov who is winding up his visit to Teheran said in an interview with Itar-Tass.

"Russia is coming out for solving all the questions emerging in connection with this problem by way of a dialogue, though active interaction with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)," Ivanov said.

According to the Security Council secretary, "We believe it would be useful to resume the dialogue in the previous format and we have not put forward any alternative formats and proposals." Accoridng to Ivanov, �We exchange views with Iran and with our partners in the IAEA in order to reveal the possibilities that Russia could use for easing tension."

In the words of Ivanov, "The negotiating process should be continued for the sake of removing the remaining obstacles and for purposes of continuing cooperation in the implementation of nuclear programmes for peaceful purposes."

Ivanov pointed out that in the course of his visit to Teheran the two sides did not discuss any specific Russian proposals as regards the Iranian nuclear problem settlement.


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4.
Russia denies Iran nuclear deal
BBC News
11/12/2005
(for personal use only)


A senior Russian envoy, Igor Ivanov, has met Iranian officials but denied reports he had given them a proposal aimed at ending the nuclear standoff.
Russian officials had spoken of a plan that would allow Iran to engage in uranium conversion while shifting the process of enrichment to Russia.

But Mr Ivanov, on a visit to Tehran, told Iranian television that Russia had not put forward any specific proposal.

Tehran argues that it has a legitimate right to peaceful nuclear technology.

It has given no hint that it is willing to consider a compromise that moves the most sensitive part of nuclear fuel production - enrichment - to another country, the BBC's Frances Harrison reports from Tehran.

Mr. Ivanov's denial comes a day after Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told reporters that Russia expected a swift response to its nuclear proposal.

He said Moscow was working closely with Europe, the US and the UN nuclear watchdog to find a political resolution to the issue.

'Change of attitude'

Mr. Ivanov met Iran's top nuclear negotiator, Ali Larijani, on Saturday.

Mr. Larijani said afterwards that instead of new proposals, what Iran needed was a change of attitude so that Iran's rights were recognised.

He added that if any proposals were put forward, then Iran would take them into consideration.

The West fears that the enrichment process could enable Iran to produce nuclear weapons-grade uranium.

In August Tehran rejected European proposals for resolving the crisis and resumed the processing of uranium.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in September paved the way for Iran's referral to the Security Council - which could impose sanctions - but the agency has not set a date for this.

The agency's board of governors is due to discuss the issue on 24 November.


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5.
Bushehr power station to be implemented: Moscow
IRNA
11/10/2005
(for personal use only)


Moscow--Spokesman for the Russian Atomic Energy Agency Nikolai Shingarev said here Thursday that the project on Bushehr Nuclear Power Station is currently underway and is expected be completed on schedule.

Speaking to IRNA in an exclusive interview, he added that Bushehr Power Station is being constructed by the Russian enterprise, Energo Export, a contractor of Russia's nuclear power stations overseas.

Shingarev noted that the construction process of the project is supervised by the Russian Atomic Energy Agency and that there is no obstacle to its implementation.

Concerning Russia's proposal on uranium enrichment and the nuclear fuel cycle, he said that for the time being he is not in a position to elaborate on the issue.

Turning to the Wednesday remarks of the British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw concerning Europe's reluctance to refer Iran's nuclear dossier to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), he said, "It is up to the Foreign Ministry to make decision in this respect. It has repeatedly declared that there is no reason for referral of the case to the UNSC.

About the possible date of the visit to Tehran of the Head of Russia's Atomic Energy Agency, Alexander Rumyantsev, he said that he would certainly visit Iran either at the end of the current year or early next year.

The political circles in Russia's capital of Moscow have recently released reports on the country's proposed nuclear fuel cycle to Iran.


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6.
Russia proposes compromise over Iranian uranium plant
Guy Dinmore, Daniel Dombey, Roula Khalaf And Gareth Smyth
Financial Times
11/10/2005
(for personal use only)


LONDON, BRUSSELS , TEHRAN and WASHINGTON -- The European Union is considering a compromise Russian proposal on Iran's nuclear programme that would permit some nuclear processing on Iranian territory - even though the EU had previously ruled this out.

The Russian proposal to provide safeguards against the diversion of nuclear material for weapons production is to be put forward by Igor Ivanov, secretary of Russia's National Security Council, who begins a three- day visit to Iran tomorrow.

The proposal recognises Tehran's right to nuclear technology but stipulates that all uranium enrichment - which can produce weapons grade material - be done in Russia. In a key concession to Tehran, it would allow a plant at Isfahan to continue uranium conversion - an earlier part of the nuclear cycle.

The move comes as the UK, France and Germany, which have led EU negotiations with Iran, scramble to win international support for their stance ahead of a key vote at the United Nations' nuclear watchdog in two weeks' time.

Iran has previously warned that any steps to refer its nuclear dossier to the UN Security Council could lead it to lift its freeze on enrichment - the EU's greatest fear.

British officials said Russia's ideas would not be "ruled out". Europe could also consider a "role" for Isfahan facility, even though in the past the EU has called for its activities to cease.

"We need to make sure the arrangements are proliferation-free," said a British official. He suggested that if the proposal were deemed acceptable by European governments, the US would also back it. "If we can live with something the Americans can live with it," he said.

Yesterday, Sergei Lavrov, Russian foreign minister, said there was "no gap" between the EU and Russia on Iran.

But it is far from certain that the Russian offer will be enough for Tehran.

Although Ali Larijani, Iran's top nuclear negotiator, recently asked the Europeans to restart talks, there has been no sign of Tehran letting up on its long-held insistence on its "right" to full control of the nuclear fuel cycle, including uranium enrichment.

The Russian move comes as the governing board of the International Atomic Energy Agency prepares to meet on November 24 to consider whether Iran is responding to a September resolution that found it in "non-compliance" with its nuclear obligations. The IAEA resolution marked the first step towards reference to the UN Security Council.

In an effort to head off more international pressure Iran has stepped up its co-operation with IAEA inspectors, recently allowing them access to a military complex.

A western diplomat said the US and the three European states did not have the backing of China and Russia for a Security Council referral at present. Non-aligned members of the board, such as India and South Africa, were also reluctant, especially as Mohamed ElBaradei, the IAEA director general, reiterated in Washington this week the agency was making good progress with its inspections in Iran.

However, Iran's relations with western governments have been strained by the controversial comments of Mahmoud Ahmadi-Nejad, the new hardline president. His call for Israel to be "wiped off" the map was widely condemned.

Additional reporting by Guy Dinmore in Washington


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D.  Russia-North Korea

1.
No nuclear contacts with N. Korea for 10 years - Russian official
Alexei Berezin
RIA Novosti
11/10/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON - Russia has not had contacts with North Korea in the nuclear energy sphere for more than 10 years, the head of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Power said Thursday.

"Pyongyang has not contacted Russia [on the issue]," Alexander Rumyantsev told a news conference in the U.S. capital. "And even if it does, it will have to rejoin the Non-Proliferation Treaty to prove that it strictly observes all regulations."

"We have not had any contacts with North Korea [in the sphere of nuclear energy] for more than a decade," the official added.

Russia is party to six-nation negotiations, also involving North and South Korea, the United States, China, and Japan, which began in August 2003 and aim to persuade North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons development in return for economic and diplomatic rewards.

The fourth round of talks, held in September this year, ended with Pyongyang agreeing to dismantle its nuclear weapons program and abide by International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards in exchange for economic aid.

One day after the deal was struck, however, the North Korean leadership said they would begin disarmament only if the U.S. provided a light-water reactor for civilian use.



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E.  Nuclear Forces

1.
Russia to equip Topol-M systems with new warheads
RIA Novosti
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)


VLASIKHA (MOSCOW REGION)-- New warheads for the strategic missiles currently being tested will be installed on silo-based and mobile Topol-M missiles, the commander of Russia's strategic missile forces said Monday.

Colonel General Nikolai Solovtsov did not elaborate on the number of warheads slated to be installed, nor did he specify the deadline for installation.

Solovtsov said Russia and the United States would cut down their strategic nuclear stocks to 1,700-2,200 warheads under the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty by January 1, 2012.


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2.
Russia to order more strategic missiles
RIA Novosti
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)


VLASIKHA (Moscow Region)- Commander Colonel General Nikolai Solovtsov said Monday that Russia plans to expand its strategic missile forces.

"The state arms program envisages the number of launching sites and missiles provided by the [defense] industry to be raised by 10, 12, or 15," Solovtsov said, echoing Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov, who said earlier that he was sure the industry sector would manage to provide six intercontinental ballistic missiles for the forces in 2006.

"The main problem now is the funds needed for capital development," Solovtsov said referring to the construction of silos and infrastructure for missile units and formations, as well as roads, buildings, and facilities. "Introducing silo-based and mobile systems requires a lot of investment. This is a serious problem."


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3.
URGENT: Defense Minister to retain post, be appointed deputy PM - Putin
RIA Novosti
11/14/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russian Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov will retain his post and be appointed a deputy prime minister, President Vladimir Putin said Monday at a session with government members.

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F.  Official Statements

1.
PRESS RELEASE: On the Results of the First Session of the Fifth Round of Six-Party Talks on the Resolution of the Korean Peninsula Nuclear Issue
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
11/11/2005
(for personal use only)


The first session of the fifth round of the six-party talks on the resolution of the Korean Peninsula nuclear issue was held in Beijing on November 9-11. From the Russian side participating in the talks was a delegation led by Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Alexeyev.

The participants in the talks had a constructive discussion on the ways to implement the Joint Statement on the General Principles of Settlement adopted in September of this year after the fourth round. The sides confirmed their commitment to full and comprehensive compliance with the provisions of the Joint Statement, on the basis of the principle of "commitment for commitment, action for action" in order to achieve the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula as soon as possible.

Based on the results of the first session of the fifth round, the sides adopted the Statement of the Chairman, which expressed the participating countries' commitment to further work through enhanced mutual trust and the fulfillment of all obligations in different areas as well as a coordinated and timely approach, ensuring the balance of interests and the benefits for all.

The sides agreed to hold the second session of the fifth round at the earliest opportunity.

The Russian side will continue, in close coordination with other participants in the talks, working on the development of a package of concrete proposals that may in the future ensure full compliance with the provisions of the Joint Statement.


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2.
Briefing En Route Shannon, Ireland
Condoleezza Rice
U.S. Department of State
11/10/2005
(for personal use only)


***EDITED***

QUESTION: Madame Secretary, just on another subject, there's a report that there has been a solution that might be proposed to Iran involving the treatment of their fuel outside, perhaps in Russia, and that you have set a deadline of two weeks to give them to respond, according to the report. Can you respond, please?

SECRETARY RICE: Let me make a few comments about the story that was there this morning. The first thing is there is no U.S.-European proposal to the Iranians. I want to say that categorically. There isn't and there won't be. We are doing what we have been doing for some time, which is keeping our partners -- our diplomatic partners are keeping us apprised of their thinking about the future of their negotiations with the Iranians. It won't surprise you that we have constant contact with the European 3 about the kinds of ideas that are being explored. We also are discussing with the Russians ideas that they have had, but I want to underscore there isn't and there won't be a U.S. proposal. We are not parties to these negotiations and we don't intend to become parties to the negotiation.

We are supportive of a diplomatic solution to this problem but it has to be a diplomatic solution in which the Iranians do not acquire the technological capacity to break out and make a nuclear weapon. Now, in that regard, everybody is most concerned about enrichment and reprocessing, what the President has called a loophole in the NPT. But we are also concerned about other parts of the fuel cycle and I think it's fair to say that we would be very concerned if the Iranians were left with stockpiles of UF-6 that could be used in nuclear weapons. But I don't want to get any further into details about what may be being contemplated by other parties to the negotiations -- by the parties to the negotiations.

We do hope that if there is a way for the Iranians to accept a way forward that would give confidence that they are not, in fact, trying to seek a nuclear weapon under cover of a civilian nuclear program, that they would take that. And we've said that.

Now, we believe that we have the votes in the IAEA for a referral. As I've said before, we'll do it at a time of our choosing and it, of course, depends on what the course of the diplomacy looks like. So we're following it very closely. We're talking to people.

Finally, there was something about assured fuel supply. And we've been in discussions with a number of parties about assured fuel supply as a way to close the loophole in the NPT for some time. I think you'll remember that the President talked about potential assured fuel supply all the way back in his NDU speech. Mohamed ElBaradei has talked about that. We did indeed talk about that when I saw him. It is a very good way for countries to fulfill their needs for fuel for a civilian reactor without the kind of proliferation risk that's attendant to enriching and reprocessing. And the Russians structured the Bushehr nuclear deal in that way, and as we've said, we think there are favorable characteristics to the way that deal was structured. So that's what's going on.

***EDITED***


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3.
Nuclear Proliferation Cited as Top Security Concern; Policymakers discuss ways to prevent spread of nuclear weapons
Ryan Callanan
Washington File: U.S. Department of State
11/10/2005
(for personal use only)


Washington - Threat of nuclear proliferation should be the top security concern for the international community, says Mohamed ElBaradei, director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

He discussed some problems and goals of the IAEA at the November 7-8 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington.

Speaking at the conference November 7, ElBaradei said one of the main weaknesses of the IAEA is the ineffectiveness of nuclear verification. The annual budget of the IAEA is only $120 million, and the agency funds just 650 inspectors to work at more than 900 nuclear facilities in 71 countries, he said. Most countries, ElBaradei said, allow inspectors to look only into declared activities. Only about 70 countries have accepted the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty�s Additional Protocol, which allows for some inspections to look into undeclared activities.

One of ElBaradei�s goals for the IAEA is to institute a time-limited moratorium on new uranium enrichment and plutonium separation facilities. He also said he will encourage the United Nations Security Council to be more aggressive in its response to countries that violate the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

"To be effective, the U.N. Security Council must be ready at all times to engage, in order to cope with emerging threats to international peace and security," ElBaradei said.

For additional information on the NPT, see the State Department electronic journal, Today�s Nuclear Equation.

BUSH ADMINISTRATION NONPROLIFERATION POLICY

Robert Joseph, under secretary of state for arms control and international security, also speaking November 7, outlined the Bush administration�s strategy on nuclear nonproliferation during his keynote address at the conference. He said that the NPT has a weakness because it allows countries to develop nuclear weapons under the guise of a peaceful nuclear energy program.

The Bush administration�s proposal, according to Joseph, is to create a virtual fuel bank for the world. Working as an intermediary, the IAEA would guarantee a constant flow of nuclear fissile material by connecting buyers and sellers in times of market flux, he said.

The market for fissile material is providing the needed level of supplies at this time, but a guaranteed supply is necessary to convince states that a domestic reprocessing program is unnecessary, he said. Removing the need for domestic reprocessing programs would make it very difficult for rogue states to hide their intentions. The proposal also would mandate that all spent fuel be returned to the donor state, so that it could not be enriched to make nuclear weapons.

The text of Joseph�s remarks is available on the State Department Web site.

BALANCING SECURITY AND ENERGY NEEDS

Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman is a strong proponent of President Bush�s proposal to create a virtual fuel bank. He addressed the conference on the need to balance nonproliferation security measures with the nuclear energy needs of developing nations.

The Department of Energy�s Energy Information Administration, Bodman said, estimates that there will be a 50 percent increase in energy use around the world by 2025, with more than half of that growth coming in the world�s emerging economies.

"The need for peaceful nuclear power all over the globe has never been more apparent, while at the same time, the proliferation threat posed by nuclear materials and technology has never been more grave," said Bodman.

The energy secretary said President Bush�s proposal makes nuclear energy available to developing nations while at the same time aiding nonproliferation efforts. (See related article.)

IRAN AND NORTH KOREA

Ariel Levite, of the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission, spoke about the concealment and deception that has been a part of Iran�s nuclear program during a panel discussion titled "The Iranian Stalemate." He also said that if Iran became a nuclear power, other Middle Eastern countries such as Egypt and Saudi Arabia would be threatened and,in turn, might become nuclear powers. Levite said that the international community must unite to pressure Iran into halting its nuclear program.

Siegfried Hecker of Stanford University spoke at a November 8 panel discussion on North Korea, describing his tour of part of the nuclear facilities in Yongbyon. He said he suspected that the North Korean government allowed him to see the facilities as a way for them to show the United States that they have nuclear weapons. He said that North Korea has removed 8,000 spent fuel rods from the facility, and has increased efficency in reprocesssing by 30 percent. (See U.S. Policy Toward North Korea.)

"We have to assume that the North Koreans can and have made at least a few simple nuclear weapons," Hecker said.

COOPERATION WITH RUSSIA

The Nunn-Lugar program is one of the main ways in which the United States is working with Russia on nonproliferation issues. The program provides U.S. funding for Russia to use in its nonproliferation efforts. Both Senator Richard Lugar of Indiana and former Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia spoke November 8 at the conference. The funding is used to destroy some fissile material and to secure the rest. So far, 86 percent of Russian nuclear sites have improved security, and two Russian reactors are scheduled to shut down by 2008, said Linton Brooks, head of the National Nuclear Security Administration. But Nunn said much work remains to destroy or secure fissile material in Russia.

"We have made progress, but I still think that this is the greatest threat we face as a nation," said Nunn. (See related article.)

For additional information on U.S. policy, see Arms Control and Non-Proliferation.

More information about the conference is available on Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Web site.


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4.
State Department Official Touts Nonproliferation Policy; Joseph says one aspect was development of national strategy for WMD
U.S. Department of State/Bureau of International Information Programs
11/10/2005
(for personal use only)


Washington -- The current U.S. administration has undertaken more effective multilateral initiatives and more multilateral diplomatic efforts to block and roll back nuclear proliferation than any previous administration, a senior State Department official says.

"While we have clearly not solved all the problems, we are taking on the problems very directly, with realism and determination, and in league with our international partners," said Robert Joseph, under secretary of state for arms control and international security, at the 2005 Carnegie International Non-Proliferation Conference in Washington November 7.

Almost immediately on assuming office, Joseph said, President Bush realized that the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction required a new and comprehensive approach.

When the National Strategy to Combat Weapons Of Mass Destruction was promulgated in 2002, it "was really the first of its kind -- a broad, truly national and international strategy, which united all the elements of national power -- including diplomacy, intelligence, law enforcement, and military -- needed to counter WMD."

The strategy, Joseph said, rested on three pillars: prevention, protection and consequence management.

Prevention involves efforts to keep WMD and related materials and delivery systems from terrorists or rogue states. Protection refers to counterproliferation, he said, with capabilities to deter, detect, defend against and defeat WMD already possessed by terrorists or rogue states. Consequence management means reducing as much or as many consequences of WMD attacks at home or abroad as possible.

Joseph also spoke at some length about the U.S. administration's effective multilateral action against proliferation, including: Nunn-Lugar programs to secure or destroy at-risk nuclear weapons and weapons materials; the G8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction; the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and secure fissile and radioactive material worldwide; the Second Line of Defense and Megaports programs to install radiation detection capabilities at major seaports, airports and border crossings; redirection programs in Libya and Iraq to provide alternative employment for weapons scientists and engineers; and passage in 2004 of U.N. Security Council Resolution 1540.

Joseph also made specific reference to Iran and its pursuit of nuclear weapons. Iran, he said, "has pursued numerous routes to acquire an indigenous nuclear fuel cycle capability to provide it with fissile material for weapons," both via the use of plutonium and enriched uranium.

"All of these efforts involved a dizzying array of cover stories and false statements," Joseph said. "Iran's pursuit of nuclear weapons is real -- an issue the Bush administration takes -- and believes the international community takes -- very seriously."

Joseph's remarks are available on the State Department Web site.


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5.
Secretary Bodman, Director Rumyantsev Issue Joint Statement on Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiatives
U.S. Department of Energy
11/9/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON, DC--U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman and Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency Director, Aleksandr Rumyantsev today released a joint statement on the status of the Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiative.

The Bratislava Initiative was announced by President George W. Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin in February 2005 and aims, in part, to reduce the threat of nuclear and radiological proliferation.

"The United States and Russia bear unique responsibilities in the area of nuclear nonproliferation," Secretary Bodman said. "The Bratislava Initiative not only represents both the spirit and the desire of our nations to fight terrorism on a global scale, but demonstrates real progress in enhancing the security of the nuclear facilities in our two countries as well as around the globe. I look forward to presenting the first report of our working group to President Bush next month."

Joint Statement
On Status of Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiatives
By Chairmen of the Senior Interagency Group
Samuel Bodman, US Secretary of Energy
Aleksandr Rumyantsev, Director of the RF Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom)

During the February 2005 meeting in Bratislava, Presidents George Bush and Vladimir Putin recognized the special responsibility of both Governments to secure nuclear weapons and fissile material to prevent the possibility that such weapons or materials could fall into the hands of terrorists. The Presidents established a bilateral Senior Interagency Working Group to address issues of cooperation on nuclear security. That group is charged with reporting on the status of cooperation to the Presidents. The first report was issued in June of 2005 and the second is due in December.

Both the U.S. and Russian Chairs of this working group are pleased to announce that progress is being made under the Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiative and expect a full report to be completed for transmittal to Presidents Bush and Putin by 15 December 2005.

The report will reflect the progress of work to date and the implementation of tasks specific to the February 2005, Bratislava joint statement, as well as intentions for future activities in these areas.

The work being done under this initiative is of utmost importance for U.S., Russian and world security. It is the intention of both sides to continue cooperation under this Initiative for the foreseeable future and to provide the Presidents of the United States and the Russian Federation with periodic reports on progress made.

Media contact:
Bryan Wilkes (NNSA), 202/586-7371


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G.  Items of Interest

1.
Change of the Guard Raising Alarm Bells: As the Nuclear Workforce Ages, Concerns Rise About Preserving Knowledge
IAEA
11/11/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.iaea.org/NewsCenter/News/2005/change_guard.html


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2.
NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION: IAEA Has Strengthened Its Safeguards and Nuclear Security Programs, but Weaknesses Need to Be Addressed
GAO
10/7/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0693.pdf


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