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Nuclear News - 10/4/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, October 4, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  Submarine Dismantlement
    1. Italy to allocate 360m euro for submarine dismantling in Russia , Bellona Foundation (10/4/2005)
    2. Equipment installation began at reactor compartment storage facility in Sayda bay , Bellona Foundation (10/3/2005)
B.  Nuclear Terrorism
    1. Congressman Says U.S. Residents Should Get Training in Case of Nuclear, Radiological Attack, Joe Fiorill, Global Security Newswire (9/30/2005)
C.  G-8 Global Partnership
    1. Finland prepares to fund dismantling of Russian plutonium reactor , Bellona Foundation (9/30/2005)
D.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy
    1. State Department Cuts Arms Control Bureau, David Ruppe, Global Security Newswire (9/30/2005)
E.  US-Russia
    1. Russia Continues to Resist U.S. Access to Nuclear Sites Despite Security Cooperation, NNSA Chief Says, Global Security Newswire (10/3/2005)
    2. Russian MPs speak out against Swiss decision to extradite Adamov to U.S. , RIA Novosti (10/3/2005)
    3. Silent on Putin's Slide: Bush Ignores Russia's Fading Freedom, Fred Hiatt, Washington Post (10/3/2005)
    4. Swiss to Extradite Russia Nuclear Minister , Daniel Friedli, Associated Press (10/3/2005)
    5. US presses Russia to freeze Iran nuclear project , Irwin Arieff , Reuters (10/3/2005)
    6. NNSA Administrator Linton Brooks Visits Russia, DOE Weekly Report (9/30/2005)
F.  Russia-Iran
    1. Tehran ready to hear Russian proposals on nuclear program , RIA Novosti (10/4/2005)
    2. Russia complies with all norms in nuclear cooperation with Iran - official (Part 2), Interfax (9/30/2005)
G.  Nuclear Forces
    1. Russia Successfully Tests Intercontinental Ballistic Missile, MosNews (9/30/2005)
    2. Vice Admiral Vladimir Vysotsky Appointed Commander of Northern Fleet, DOE Weekly Report (9/30/2005)
H.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Unit 2 lifetime prolongation at Leningrad NPP , Bellona Foundation (9/30/2005)
I.  Official Statements
    1. Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Alexeyev Meets with US Ambassador to Moscow William Burns , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (10/4/2005)
    2. Russian MFA Information and Press Department Commentary Regarding Reports About Iran's Plans to Cease Application of the Additional Protocol to the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (10/3/2005)
    3. Statement By The Ministry Of Foreign Affairs Of The Russian Federation Regarding the Decision by the Swiss Federal Department of Justice to Extradite Ex-Head of the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry Yevgeny Adamov to the United States, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (10/3/2005)
    4. Midpoint Of The Successful Implementation Of The Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Agreement Between The United States And Russia, Sean McCormack, Spokesman, U.S. Department of State/Bureau of International Information Programs (9/30/2005)
J.  Items of Interest
    1. Russia drafts laws restricting foreign investment in defence industry , Ben Vogel, Editor, Janes (10/4/2005)
    2. Lugar Gets State Department Commitment on Weapons Destruction, Office of Sen. Richard Lugar (9/30/2005)



A.  Submarine Dismantlement

1.
Italy to allocate 360m euro for submarine dismantling in Russia
Bellona Foundation
10/4/2005
(for personal use only)


The Italian government approved an agreement with Russia concerning dismantlement of the Russian nuclear submarines and safe handling of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste.

The agreement stipulates allocation of 360m euro from 2005 to 2013. The Russian-Italian agreement is a part of the Italian Global Partnership pledge. The agreement was approved in June by the Russian Parliament. The Russian President signed it on July 1, ITAR-TASS reported.

Italian Sogin Spa Company will take part in the dismantling projects in Russia. The company provides safety at the four Italian nuclear reactors shut down in 1987 after the referendum. The Italian company will take part in the dismantlement of vessels, radioactive waste treatment, transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel, physical security measures, and infrastructure, ITAR-TASS reported.


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2.
Equipment installation began at reactor compartment storage facility in Sayda bay
Bellona Foundation
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


Installation of the equipment delivered from Germany has begun at the long-term reactor compartment storage facility in Sayda bay, Murmansk region.

The project is developed according to the agreement between the Russian Nuclear Federal Agency and the German Labour Ministry signed in October 2003, the chief engineer Rostislav Rimdenok said to Interfax. The German specialists are installing lifting equipment and testing it with light and heavy reactor compartments in various situations.

According to Rimdenok, Germany is delivering to Nerpa shipyard equipment for the effective submarine dismantling and the complete facility for long-term storage of reactor compartments. He added that nine submarines and 48 reactor compartments are stored today in Sayda bay. More than half of them is filled with solid radioactive waste. The lack of space for more reactor compartments can seriously hinder the whole process of the nuclear submarine dismantling process.

The date of start-up of the first part of the reactor storage facility is postponed from September until November 18. Such a decision was made at the meeting of the managing Russian-German Committee in August, Interfax reported. The initial agreement stipulated September 2005 as the completion date for the first part of the facility in Sayda bay. However, after geological research on the site, it turned out that the site is more complicated and therefore demands more work and money, Interfax reported referring to the source at the Nerpa shipyard. The first part of the facility should accommodate from 30 to 40 reactor compartments. The whole facility, which is to enter service in 2008, should contain 120 compartments as well as the waste from the nuclear service ships.


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B.  Nuclear Terrorism

1.
Congressman Says U.S. Residents Should Get Training in Case of Nuclear, Radiological Attack
Joe Fiorill
Global Security Newswire
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON -- U.S. residents should be better prepared for a nuclear or radiological attack, a House of Representatives member said yesterday.

Since terrorists with nuclear weapons are the United States� "No. 1 concern," Representative Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) said at a subcommittee hearing on counterterrorism, Washington should be preparing U.S. residents for such an occurrence by conducting attack drills and acquiring radiation countermeasures.

"We have to be more realistic and prepare our population on how to deal not just with hurricanes but with small nuclear weapons," said Sherman, the senior Democrat on the International Relations International Terrorism and Nonproliferation Subcommittee.

Sherman recalled Cold War bomb drills conducted in schools, saying such drills might have been pointless given the probable severity of any Soviet attack. He contrasted that potential with the current threat of a terrorist radiological attack. "Now is when such bomb drills might not be laughable," Sherman said.

In addition to drilling for an attack, Sherman said, everyone in the country should have on hand countermeasures such as potassium iodide, which prevents thyroid uptake of cancer-causing radioactive iodine. The failure to take such measures is a sign the country is seeking to "hide" from the threat, he said.

Sherman also said Washington should try to head off the possibility by stepping up efforts to persuade Iran to renounce any nuclear-weapon ambition and by courting Russia as a partner on non-nuclear matters as a way of building confidence for nuclear security operations.

Center for National Policy President Tim Roemer, a witness at the hearing, said al-Qaeda is determined to get nuclear weapons and the United States should react accordingly by doing more to lock down Russian nuclear materials.

"We know where they are, we know how to secure them, and we�re not doing enough of doing that," said Roemer, a Democratic former House member from Indiana and member of the Sept. 11 commission.


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C.  G-8 Global Partnership

1.
Finland prepares to fund dismantling of Russian plutonium reactor
Bellona Foundation
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


Finland prepares to participate in the funding of the closing of the plutonium reactor of a nuclear power plant in Zheleznogorsk, Russia.

Finland is thinking of spending 500,000 euros for the purpose, STT NewsRoom Finland reported.

Finland aims at reaching a decision with the United States by the end of this year. The project is part of the Global Partnership program of G8. The program aims at dismantling safely the arsenal of weapons of mass destruction dating to the Soviet era. Finland has participated earlier in the program by destroying chemical weapons and improving nuclear safety. The Siberian plant is to be closed down by the end of 2010.


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D.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy

1.
State Department Cuts Arms Control Bureau
David Ruppe
Global Security Newswire
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON -- The U.S. State Department this month quietly began implementing a major reorganization plan to eliminate its arms control and nonproliferation bureaus, despite a U.S. Senate hold on the plan.

An order eliminating the two bureaus and transferring their elements into a single bureau of international security and nonproliferation became "effective Sept. 13," a department official said.

The department has otherwise been tight-lipped about the move, but evidence also appeared in the form of a Federal Register notice this week signed by Stephen Rademaker, who was identified as acting assistant secretary of state in charge of the new bureau.

Republican and Democratic congressional offices said the move should not have been formalized and that as far as they are concerned the reorganization has not yet gone through.

"Our understanding is that it is not yet in place," said Andy Fisher, spokesman for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and its chairman Senator Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), who has endorsed the reorganization plan.

"It hasn�t as far as we�re concerned up here," said Norm Kurz, spokesman for Senator Joe Biden (D-Del.), the ranking Democrat on the committee.

"There�s a hold on it, from what I understand, on the matter of how it�s going to get reorganized. There are people who want to look at what are the implications instead of just marching ahead with this and so they�re trying to slow things down," he said.

The hold is particularly motivated by a concern that nonproliferation activities would not receive sufficient priority under the plan, Kurz said. "There are people who say, �What�s going to happen to the nonproliferation part of this?�"

Arms Control Dismantlement

The reorganization would effectively complete an eight-year, Republican-driven process of dismantling the State Department�s once sizable infrastructure dedicated to advocating, negotiating, implementing and verifying major arms control and nonproliferation agreements.

In 1999, the department disbanded its Arms Control and Disarmament Agency which had spearheaded U.S. policy on major Cold War arms control treaties, such as the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, and the now-defunct Antiballistic Missile Treaty, among others. In the 1990s, the agency had a $40 million budget and about 250 employees.

"The agency�s unique focus on arms control and nonproliferation issues provides a singular and invaluable perspective to the president, different from purely diplomatic, defense or other concerns," says an archived ACDA Web page published last decade at a time when the agency was fighting for its survival.

In 1997, pressured by then-Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Senator Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) but declaring the aim of "reinventing government," the Clinton administration announced it would eliminate ACDA and fold it arms control and nonproliferation components, and other pieces, into other State Department bureaus.

Now, under the Bush administration�s plan, elements of the department�s Arms Control and Nonproliferation bureaus, each run by an assistant secretary of state, would be merged into a new super-bureau for "International Security and Nonproliferation," according to an outline provided this year to Congress and obtained by Global Security Newswire.

The new bureau would incorporate elements of both bureaus, as well as other responsibilities, and be structured to reflect the administration�s priorities. The assistant secretary would oversee three deputy assistant secretaries, for: threat reduction, export controls and negotiations; counterproliferation; and nuclear nonproliferation policy and negotiations.

Apparently, the only senior State Department official with "arms control" in his title would be the director for the Office of Conventional Arms Control. That official, and other elements of the cancelled arms control and nonproliferation bureaus, would be located in a separate "bureau for verification, compliance and implementation."

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, announcing the plan on July 29, said the changes were needed to address the kinds of threats the United States is facing. "Today, protecting America from weapons of mass destruction requires more than deterrence and arms control treaties. We must also go on the offensive against outlaw scientists, black market arms dealers and rogue state proliferators."

"Today�s security threats still require a robust and competent arms control and nonproliferation and disarmament effort on the part of the U.S. State Department," said Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association, citing for instance "a need to get a handle on" thousands Russian of tactical nuclear weapons and negotiation of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty.

"We believe the reorganization will not be helpful but in the end the proof will be in the administration�s record," he said.

Rice vowed to "continue to work with Congress," on the plan. However, several days later, Global Security Newswire reported the department planned to begin after a mandatory 15-day congressional review period that happened to coincide with Congress�s August recess.

Later that month, the Washington Post reported that House International Relations Committee Chairman Henry Hyde (R-Ill.) had ordered the department not to move forward until his committee could be briefed on the details.

The chairman was soon after satisfied, said committee spokesman Sam Stratman. "The hold placed on that by Chairman Hyde was removed in August, following a detailed briefing," he said.

But some in the Senate still are not, Kurz said, and added, "There�s a larger question of accountability."


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E.  US-Russia

1.
Russia Continues to Resist U.S. Access to Nuclear Sites Despite Security Cooperation, NNSA Chief Says
Global Security Newswire
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia�s continued resistance to providing access to some nuclear installations is hampering joint efforts to improve security at such sites, the top U.S. nuclear safety official said Saturday.

The access requested by Washington is "very minimal, (but) I think from the Russian perspective it�s unprecedented and so we�re working these things out," U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration chief Linton Brooks told the Associated Press.

Officials must provide evidence that U.S. security funds are being spent properly so that Congress will renew the allocations, Brooks said.

Washington is attempting to shift the focus of U.S.-Russia nuclear security cooperation "from assistance to partnership," he said.

"One of the things we�re trying to do is not just put a bunch of bars on windows and install a bunch of alarm systems, but help Russia create a system that doesn�t depend on the United States for ensuring sustained security of weapons and materials," he said.

However, several bilateral nuclear security efforts continue to experience delays, AP reported. A number of Russia�s most sensitive nuclear installations remain completely off limits to U.S. nuclear security experts, including two weapons assembly sites, Brooks said.

In addition, a program to build U.S. and Russian plants to destroy weapon-grade plutonium by blending it into mixed-oxide fuel has been delayed due to funding difficulties for the Russian plant. Moscow is still awaiting several hundred million dollars in international aid, according to AP.

"We�re in the position that the Russians are reluctant to move forward until they see the rest of the international funding and I�m having trouble getting some of the rest of the international funding until people see the Russians are moving forward," said Brooks (Judith Ingram, Associated Press, Oct. 1).


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2.
Russian MPs speak out against Swiss decision to extradite Adamov to U.S.
RIA Novosti
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, October 3 (RIA Novosti) - A Russian parliamentarian criticized on Monday the Swiss Department of Justice's decision to extradite Yevgeny Adamov, a former Russian minister of nuclear power, to the United States, where he faces embezzlement charges. Vladimir Pekhtin, deputy speaker of the State Duma, the lower house of parliament, said Russia and Switzerland were signatories of an international extradition agreement, which meant that the ex-minister should have been sent to Russia after its Prosecutor General's Office filed an official request to do so in May.

"Russia and Switzerland have an international agreement on extradition and, correspondingly, the decision should be legal," Pekhtin said.

Other parliamentarians also voiced their disapproval. Mikhail Grishankov, deputy chairman of the Duma security committee, said Adamov knew top state secrets and his extradition to the U.S. could "damage Russia's state security."

Duma Deputy Speaker Vladimir Zhirinovsky said the U.S. wanted to obtain information from Adamov on Iran's capability to produce nuclear weapons. He also said corruption was to blame for Adamov's extradition to the U.S. In his view, as Adamov is a Russian citizen and Russia submitted its extradition request before the U.S., the ex-minister should have been sent to his homeland.

The head of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Power, Alexander Rumyantsev, said Russia should try to secure Adamov's extradition because he is a Russian citizen.


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3.
Silent on Putin's Slide: Bush Ignores Russia's Fading Freedom
Fred Hiatt
Washington Post
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


On Sept. 23, a week after President Bush had been "pleased to welcome my friend Vladimir Putin back to the White House," Putin took another step toward choking off political freedom in Russia.

He had already sent a message to business executives not to challenge him, by indicting oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky and destroying his company with tax bills, forced sell-offs and other tactics of selective justice. Now, hours after Khodorkovsky's appeal had been denied in a comically brief process, and an eight-year jail term affirmed, Putin went after the lawyers.

A Canadian lawyer working on the case, Robert Amsterdam, was rousted from his hotel room at 1 a.m. by agents of what used to be called the KGB and was given 24 hours to leave the country. More seriously, prosecutors said they would seek to disbar Russian lawyers who had defended Khodorkovsky -- and in Putin's Russia, prosecutors get what they seek.

It's tempting to call these tactics Stalinist, but Putin is both less bloody and in some ways more clever than Stalin. He doesn't have a lot of people killed. But he understands that he doesn't have to. He can reimpose authoritarian rule without a gulag, simply by spreading fear through example.

He can fire one editor for putting a negative story on the front page and other editors get the message. He can have one or two judges dismissed without pension and other judges toe the line. Threaten a few human rights organizations, allow the murders of a few journalists to go unsolved, open a criminal investigation of the one politician who mentions challenging you in the next election, throw a few businessmen into tuberculosis-infested prison cells -- and word gets around.

Amsterdam, who has worked in many countries euphemistically known as "emerging markets," told me after leaving Russia that he has never worked in a country where the fear was so palpable, and the political space so constricted, as in Putin's domain.

The Bush administration, after some zigs and zags on Russia, seems to have developed a fairly coherent strategy regarding Russia's slide from democracy: Ignore it. The National Security Council apparatus in the White House believes that what happens inside Russia is irrelevant to the United States; that the United States can't do much to influence domestic events in any case; and that dwelling on Putin's authoritarianism would compromise other U.S. interests in bilateral relations.

Because this strategy conflicts so baldly with Bush's democracy-promotion theme, administration rhetoric sometimes sounds fiercer than this strategy would suggest. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, for example, when she last visited Moscow, spoke frankly about democracy and human rights.

But if there is concern about the loss of freedom in Russia, it doesn't translate into policy. The administration reduces funding for democracy promotion inside Russia. It doesn't challenge Putin's standing to host the Group of Eight summit next year.

And judging by Bush's performance during Putin's most recent visit, he doesn't even feel obliged to pretend anymore. He checked off the democracy box in one sentence remarkably divorced from reality, saying that Russia "will be even a stronger partner as the reforms that President Vladimir Putin has talked about are implemented: the rule of law and the ability for people to express themselves in an open way in Russia."

Then Bush made clear that he doesn't really care whether Putin implements these reforms, which Putin has not, in fact, talked about: "And every time I visit and talk with President Putin, I -- our relationship becomes stronger, and I want to thank you for that."

You could argue that what the United States gets from that relationship is worth abandoning Russians who still dream of freedom: cooperation in securing nuclear materials, Moscow making less trouble than it might for the United States in Iraq and Afghanistan. And, as Bush noted, "they've got products that we want, like energy."

In fact, though, Bush doesn't seem to be getting all that much out of the relationship, and the closing of political space in Russia does affect U.S. interests, particularly as Russia's foreign policy becomes more nationalistic and belligerent toward its neighbors.

During the Cold War, too, human rights didn't always win out in U.S. policy over the desire for natural gas or progress in arms control. But in Soviet times, U.S. leaders had an understanding of the nature of the system they were confronting and generally weren't afraid to say so. What's striking is that for the first time in decades Russia is becoming less, not more, free, and Bush can't even bring himself to acknowledge what is happening.


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4.
Swiss to Extradite Russia Nuclear Minister
Daniel Friedli
Associated Press
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


Switzerland has decided to extradite former Russian nuclear minister Yevgeny Adamov to the United States rather than to his homeland, the Justice Ministry said Monday.

Russia has been fighting the U.S. extradition request for fear Adamov could reveal nuclear secrets while facing charges in the United States of stealing up to $9 million intended for improvements to Russia's nuclear security.

Adamov has 30 days to file an appeal with the Swiss supreme court, the ministry said in a statement.

Adamov has accepted extradition only to Russia. He started a hunger strike on Monday, ministry spokesman Rudolf Wyss said, without elaborating on the reason. It was unclear if the strike was meant as a protest against the extradition procedure, he said.

Swiss authorities arrested Adamov on a U.S. warrant on May 2, while he was visiting his daughter in Bern. A U.S. federal grand jury in Pittsburgh has since indicted the Russian on charges of conspiracy to transfer stolen money and securities, conspiracy to defraud the United States, money laundering and tax evasion.

U.S. authorities suspect Adamov of embezzling U.S. Energy Department funds and diverting them into private projects in the United States, Ukraine and Russia.

The U.S. extradition request was given priority over the Russian one, because "had priority been given to Russia, Adamov's Russian citizenship would have meant that he could not subsequently have been extradited onward to the (United States)," the statement said.

Russian news agency Interfax reported that Adamov was going on a hunger strike until a decision was made on his extradition to Russia or release.

"Not recognizing a single charge brought against me and having no other way to protest against my actually unlimited confinement, I declare a hunger strike until the (Swiss) Federal Office of Justice decides on my extradition or release," Adamov said Monday in a statement published by the Russian daily Izvestia.

The Russian embassy in Bern, Switzerland, was not immediately available to comment.

_____

Associated Press correspondents Bradley S. Klapper in Geneva and Judith Ingram in Moscow contributed to this report.


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5.
US presses Russia to freeze Iran nuclear project
Irwin Arieff
Reuters
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


UNITED NATIONS - The United States, in a message aimed at Russia, called on governments involved in nuclear projects in Iran to immediately freeze those projects.

Stephen Rademaker, the U.S. assistant secretary of State for arms control, said nations should tighten their policies following last month�s finding by the International Atomic Energy Agency that Iran should be reported to the U.N. Security Council U.N. Security Council because it failed to convince the international community that its nuclear program was entirely peaceful.

"We think it is self-evident, for example, that in the face of such a finding, no government should permit new nuclear transfers to Iran, and all ongoing nuclear projects should be frozen," Rademaker told the U.N. General Assembly�s disarmament committee.

Although he did not mention Russia by name, and later declined to elaborate on his remarks in any way, Moscow is building a $1 billion civilian nuclear reactor at Bushehr in Iran and has agreed to supply it with fuel.

In Moscow, a source in the Russian nuclear industry close to the Bushehr project said Rademaker appeared to be speaking for himself and not the Bush administration.

"This is obviously an opinion of an individual, not of the U.S. government. Officially the U.S. government has said many times it saw no problem with our Bushehr project," the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"Both (U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza) Rice and the IAEA have been positive about this project," the source said.

Rice, on a trip to Moscow in April, said that Russia�s handling of the Bushehr project had been helpful in terms of preserving the global nonproliferation regime.

Rademaker said he hoped the resolution adopted September 24 by the Governing Board of the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency would help persuade Tehran to return to negotiations with Britain, France and Germany.

"Should Iran decline to do so, however, the (IAEA) Board of Governors will have no alternative but to fulfill its obligation under the IAEA statute and the recently adopted board resolution to report the matter to the United Nations ," he said.

"In the case of Iran, IAEA investigations have exposed almost two decades of clandestine nuclear work, as well as a pattern of evasion and deception, that can only be explained as part of an illegal nuclear weapons program," he said.

The IAEA resolution, approved 22-1 with 12 abstentions, also highlighted the split between Western nations and others such as Russia, China and South Africa, which disagree with the three EU nations and Washington on how to deal with Iran.

The Security Council has the power to impose sanctions on Iran, but Russia and China, as permanent members with veto powers, could block them if they chose to.

Iran denies it is seeking atomic bombs and says its nuclear program is only for generating electricity. But it concealed its atomic fuel program from the IAEA for 18 years.

Rademaker�s comments were not the first time Washington has advanced the idea that governments should have to forfeit their right to a peaceful nuclear program if they seek nuclear arms.

John Bolton, now the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told a U.N. conference on nuclear proliferation in April 2004 that countries developing or acquiring atomic weapons should forfeit the right to nuclear technology for peaceful uses.

"The central bargain of the NPT (nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty) is that if nonnuclear weapons states renounce the pursuit of nuclear weapons, they may gain assistance in developing civilian nuclear power," said Bolton, who was undersecretary of state for disarmament at the time.


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6.
NNSA Administrator Linton Brooks Visits Russia
DOE Weekly Report
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


Ambassador Linton Brooks, Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration, visited Russia this week to participate in celebrations marking the 60th anniversary of the Russian nuclear industry, the commissioning of the Kola Technical Center, and to meet with senior officials from the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom) and the Russian Ministry of Defense.

Ambassador Brooks arrived on Wednesday and participated in the Rosatom nuclear industry celebration, congratulating Rosatom Director Aleksandr Rumyantsev on the occasion. On September 29, Ambassador Brooks met with Rosatom Director Aleksandr Rumyantsev, Deputy Directors Anatoly Kotelnikov and Ivan Kamenskikh, as well as former First Deputy Minister of Atomic Energy Lev Ryabev. In the afternoon, Ambassador Brooks met with General Yury Baluyevsky, Chief of Staff of the Russian Armed Forces, as well as with U.S. Ambassador to Russia William Burns.

On September 30, 2005, Ambassador Brooks joined Russian Ministry of Defense General Anatoly Kolomichenko, Kurchatov Institute Vice President Nikolay Ponomarev-Stepnoi, retired Admiral Nikolay Yurasov, and Northern Fleet Vice Admiral Simonenko to commission the Kola Technical Center. The Kola Technical Center is a unique training complex for nuclear security professionals, established in cooperation between NNSA and the Russian Ministry of Defense.


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F.  Russia-Iran

1.
Tehran ready to hear Russian proposals on nuclear program
RIA Novosti
10/4/2005
(for personal use only)


TEHRAN - Tehran is ready to consider Russian proposals to settle problems with Iran's nuclear program, an Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman said Tuesday. "If Russia wants to play a more effective role in settling the issue of Iran's nuclear program, it must present proposals on solving the problem in question," Hamid Reza Asefi said. "The Islamic Republic, in turn, is ready to consider these proposals."

On Monday, the Russian Foreign Ministry called on Tehran, which says its nuclear programs are peaceful, to adhere to an additional protocol to an agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN's nuclear watchdog.

"The continuation of Tehran's cooperation with the IAEA on remaining issues and Iran's observance of voluntary obligations, including the additional protocol to the IAEA Safeguards Agreement, will normalize the situation involving Iran's nuclear program," the ministry said.

The Iranian parliament is currently finishing work on a document that would force the government to terminate the validity of the protocol if external pressure were to be put on Iran to end its nuclear program.


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2.
Russia complies with all norms in nuclear cooperation with Iran - official (Part 2)
Interfax
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russia is complying with all international norms in its nuclear cooperation with Iran, head of the Federal Atomic Energy Agency Alexander Rumyantsev said on Ekho Moskvy radio on Friday.

Iran has, as a party to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, the right to use nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, including the corresponding nuclear fuel cycle, he said. However, "if a country has less than 10 nuclear power units, its own nuclear fuel production is not only economically unjustified but ruinous," he said.


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G.  Nuclear Forces

1.
Russia Successfully Tests Intercontinental Ballistic Missile
MosNews
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia has successfully completed a test launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile from a nuclear submarine.

The RSM-50 missile was launched from the St. George the Victorious sub from the Sea of Okhotsk on Friday and hit a target on the island of Kanin in the White Sea, AP reported.

It was the fourth test launch of a missile from a sea-based vessel this year.

The Russian strategic forces have conducted regular test launches of Soviet-built ballistic missiles to check their readiness. The post-Soviet funding shortage has left the military struggling to extend the lifetime of Soviet-built missiles, since the government lacks the funds to quickly replace them with new weapons.

The St. George is a Delta-III-class submarine, which is equipped to carry 16 R-29R nuclear-tipped missiles.


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2.
Vice Admiral Vladimir Vysotsky Appointed Commander of Northern Fleet
DOE Weekly Report
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


A Presidential Decree this week named Vice Admiral Vladimir Vysotsky as the new Commander of the Russian Navy's Northern Fleet. Admiral Vysotsky was born in 1954 in Lvov, Ukraine. He graduated from the Nakhimov Leningrad Navy School in 1976, and Naval Special Officer School in 1982. After graduation, Admiral Vysotsky served in the Pacific Fleet as a commander of a mine and torpedo anti-submarine unit. After that, he served as executive officer of the cruiser Admiral Senyavin, as well as the heavy cruiser Minsk. Before the collapse of the Soviet Union halted construction, Admiral Vysotsky served as commissioning captain of the aircraft carrier Varyag.

In 1994, Admiral Vysotsky was named as commander of a missile cruiser division in the Pacific Fleet. In 1999, he moved to the Northern Fleet, and later became commander of the Kola Squadron. He won the rank of Vice Admiral in 2003, and was named First Deputy Commander of the Baltic Fleet in 2004.


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H.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Unit 2 lifetime prolongation at Leningrad NPP
Bellona Foundation
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


Rostekhnadzor, Russian State licencing company, is preparing to prolong the service time of the second reactor unit at the Leningrad NPP, the head of nuclear sites safety department of Rostekhnadzor Valery Bezzubtsev said to Interfax.

The unit is currently being overhauled to get service time extension. It should be reportedly back in operation on May 28, 2006. So far, total five reactors at the Kola NPP, Leningrad NPP and Novovoronezh NPP were granted service time extension.

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I.  Official Statements

1.
Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Alexeyev Meets with US Ambassador to Moscow William Burns
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
10/4/2005
(for personal use only)


A meeting took place in Moscow on October 4 between Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Alexander Alexeyev and Ambassador of the United States of America to Moscow William Burns.

In the course of the conversation certain international issues of mutual concern, including nonproliferation problems, were discussed.


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2.
Russian MFA Information and Press Department Commentary Regarding Reports About Iran's Plans to Cease Application of the Additional Protocol to the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


According to incoming reports from Teheran, the Iranian parliament (Majlis) is finishing the elaboration of a document obliging the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran to terminate the validity of the Additional Protocol in the event of pressure being further stepped up on the IRI to give up the right to develop its own nuclear fuel cycle.

We presume that it meets the interests of normalizing the situation around the IRI's nuclear program, the continuation by Teheran of enterprising cooperation with the IAEA with a view to the soonest closure of the remaining questions about this program and for the purpose of Iran's abidance by the obligations it has voluntarily assumed, including the Additional Protocol to its IAEA Safeguards Agreement. The voluntary application by Iran of the provisions of this document, which it signed in 2003 but has not yet ratified, is an extremely important confidence-building measure, whose abandonment will not be conducive to the settlement of the Iranian nuclear problem within the IAEA.


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3.
Statement By The Ministry Of Foreign Affairs Of The Russian Federation Regarding the Decision by the Swiss Federal Department of Justice to Extradite Ex-Head of the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry Yevgeny Adamov to the United States
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
10/3/2005
(for personal use only)


Today it became known that the Switzerland's Federal Department of Justice had resolved on the extradition of Yevgeny Adamov to the United States.

This decision will take effect if within 30 days Adamov does not lodge an appeal to the Supreme Court of Switzerland. The Swiss authorities claim that only then will it become possible to prosecute Adamov whether in Russia or the US. Supposedly the US will be able, after completion the criminal prosecution of Adamov, to deport him to Russia. Whereas Russia, in case of extradition of Adamov to it, will not be able to extradite him to the US, as he is a Russian citizen.

This decision arouses bewilderment.

First of all, we presume that in the presence of competing well-substantiated extradition requests, the state of the citizenship of the person whose extradition is being requested has an advantage.

There also were other factors in favor of Adamov's extradition to Russia, which the Swiss side was well aware of. We, in particular, drew attention to the fact that as a former government member Yevgeny Adamov has immunity from criminal jurisdiction of a foreign state in respect of the acts committed by him in his official capacity. All the requested information was provided to the Federal Department of Justice by the Prosecutor General's Office of Russia, including that on cooperation by the Prosecutor General's Office with the US Department of Justice on this matter. The Swiss side was informed of the consultations that are due this week between the representatives of the Prosecutor General's Office of Russia and the US Department of Justice with regard to Adamov.

A few days ago Russia expressed the hope that the decision on Yevgeny Adamov's extradition would be legally, not politically motivated. Regrettably, that did not occur. Moscow is expressing concern over the fact that the Federal Department of Justice has taken a decision which is at variance with legal and objective circumstances.

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4.
Midpoint Of The Successful Implementation Of The Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Agreement Between The United States And Russia
Sean McCormack, Spokesman
U.S. Department of State/Bureau of International Information Programs
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)


The following is a joint statement of the Departments of State and Energy of the United States of America and of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Federal Atomic Energy Agency of the Russian Federation marking the successful midpoint of implementation of the HEU agreement:

September 2005 marks a significant milestone in the implementation of the HEU Agreement. Formally known as the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation Concerning the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium from Nuclear Weapons, dated 18 February 1993, the HEU Agreement is one of the most important instruments for cooperation between our two governments. Two hundred fifty metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU), equivalent to 10,000 nuclear warheads, have been converted to low enriched uranium (LEU). This accomplishment marks the halfway point towards the goal of eliminating 500 metric tons of HEU by 2013, when the Agreement is set to be fully implemented.

Under the HEU Agreement, the Russian Federation has agreed to process HEU extracted from dismantled nuclear warheads into LEU, which is used in the United States for the peaceful purpose of generation of electricity in commercial power reactors. To implement the HEU Agreement, the United States and the Russian Federation have entered into a number of additional agreements, including a package of agreements concluded on March 24, 1999, which established a mechanism for the disposition of the natural uranium component of the LEU. These agreements have been implemented, in part, through contracts between commercial companies, whose activities in implementation of these agreements are carefully managed and overseen, as appropriate, by the U.S. and Russian Governments.

Pursuant to the HEU Agreement and the implementing contracts, 30 metric tons of Russian HEU are converted each year into LEU for use as fuel in U.S. nuclear power plants, generating approximately 10% of U.S. electricity. A unique feature of the HEU Agreement is that it is designed to realize its nuclear threat reduction goals without cost to the taxpayers of the United States or Russia. The appropriate payments and the return of the natural uranium feed component received by the Russian Federation ensure the Russian Federation's continued conversion of HEU into LEU under the Agreement and the construction and operation of facilities for this conversion, as well as a variety of other valuable activities, such as nuclear safety upgrades, conversion of military facilities to peaceful uses, and environmental clean-up.

Moreover, as noted by delegates of the United States and the Russian Federation at the Seventh Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference held in New York in May of 2005, the HEU Agreement has played a valuable role in fulfilling the Article VI obligations of the United States and Russia under the NPT to pursue negotiations on nuclear disarmament.

The United States and the Russian Federation continue to support the HEU Agreement and its goals and recognize it as one of the most significant bilateral initiatives between our governments in the area of nuclear weapons dismantlement while attaining valuable energy and environmental benefits.

Consistent with the mutual policy of our governments to strengthen cooperation in this field, and considering the crucial role played by the HEU Agreement, the United States and the Russian Federation intend to ensure that the HEU Agreement is implemented successfully and without any hindrances to achieving this goal.


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J.  Items of Interest

1.
Russia drafts laws restricting foreign investment in defence industry
Ben Vogel, Editor
Janes
10/4/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.janes.com/defence/news/jdi/jdi051004_1_n.shtml


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2.
Lugar Gets State Department Commitment on Weapons Destruction
Office of Sen. Richard Lugar
9/30/2005
(for personal use only)
http://lugar.senate.gov/pressapp/record.cfm?id=246727


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