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Nuclear News - 10/25/2005
RANSAC Nuclear News, October 25, 2005
Compiled By: Julia Myers


A.  G-8 Global Partnership
    1. Canada to Give $47M to Russia for Chemical Weapons Destruction , AFP (10/21/2005)
B.  US-Russia
    1. USA and Iran Alternate in Moscow, Alexander Reutov, Kommersant (10/24/2005)
    2. Proliferation Analysis: Megatons to Megawatts , Ben Bain , Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (10/20/2005)
    3. Russian Non-Proliferation Delegates Visit National Labs and Meet U.S. Counterparts in Washington, DC Through Open World Program, PRNewswire (10/20/2005)
C.  Russia-Iran
    1. Russia tries to break impasse with Iran, Daniel Dombey, Neil Buckley and Gareth Smyth, Financial Times (10/25/2005)
    2. Russian, Iranian presidents favor political resolution of nuclear dossier within IAEA , RIA Novosti (10/25/2005)
D.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Natwar to push Russia on NSG , Dadan Upadhyay , India Express (10/24/2005)
    2. Russia resumes talks on building Myanmar n-facility, webindia123.com (10/23/2005)
    3. Russian company delivers 20 nuclear cartridges to Prague reactor , RIA Novosti (10/21/2005)
E.  Nuclear Safety
    1. European Commission to grant Armenia food and nuclear security aid , Gamlet Matevosyan, RIA Novosti (10/25/2005)
    2. Duma ratifies Convention on Safe Management of Spent Fuel, ITAR-TASS (10/21/2005)
F.  Official Statements
    1. Mikhail Kamynin, the Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Answers a Media Question Regarding Themes of the Talks Between Foreign Ministers Sergey Lavrov of Russia and Manuchehr Mottaki of Iran on October 24, 2005, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (10/25/2005)
    2. PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Meets with Stephen Hadley, Assistant to the US President for National Security Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (10/25/2005)
    3. Transcript of Remarks by Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov at Press Conference Following Talks with Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Manuchehr Mottaki, Moscow, October 24, 2005 , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (10/24/2005)
G.  Items of Interest
    1. Nuclear Official: �Everything Should be Transparent�: Grigory Pasko interviews Sergei Antipov, deputy head of Rosatom, Russia's federal nuclear-power agency, about the decommissioning of nuclear submarines and the role of civil society in the process., Grigory Pasko , Bellona Foundation (10/25/2005)
    2. Nuclear Confusion: Does George Bush want to curb proliferation or court allies? He can't easily do both , Economist (10/20/2005)
    3. Russian, U.S. admirals talk to save sub: KSG Executive Program forged ties that saved lives, Alvin Powell , Harvard University (10/20/2005)



A.  G-8 Global Partnership

1.
Canada to Give $47M to Russia for Chemical Weapons Destruction
AFP
10/21/2005
(for personal use only)


Ottawa -- Canada will give Russia $55 million dollars ($47 million U.S.) to Russia to help fund the destruction of Russian nerve agent-filled weapons that could wipe out the world�s population several times over, the foreign ministry said Oct. 21.

The aid will allow Russia to buy the essential equipment needed for the completion of a chemical weapons destruction facility for nerve agent-filled munitions at the chemical weapons complex near Shchuch�ye in central Russia, the ministry said in a statement.

"Foreign Affairs Minister Pierre Pettigrew today announced a contribution of 55 million dollars for the destruction of chemical weapons in Russia," the ministry said.

"This project will eliminate approximately 1.9 million artillery shells filled with highly lethal nerve agents," the ministry said.

The ministry said the Russian arsenal consists of 5,440 tons of the deadly nerve agents sarin, soman and VX, which are stored in more than 1.9 million artillery and rocket-launched munitions.

"The artillery shells pose a particular risk because they are small enough to be carried and are thus especially attractive to terrorists. The Shchuchye arsenal contains enough agents to kill everyone on earth several times over," it said.

Russia has the world�s biggest stockpile of chemical weapons -- more than 40,000 tonnes. The Russian government has pledged to progressively eliminate the stockpile, most of them left over from the Soviet era, by 2012.

The Shchuch�ye chemical weapons destruction facility is one of six being built in Russia, which currently has only one such facility, in the Saratov region.

The contribution announced Friday is part of Canada�s overall commitment of up to one billion dollars over 10 years toward the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, led by the Group of Eight leading industrialized countries, the ministry said.

At a G8 summit in Kananaskis, Canada, in 2002, the seven richest countries offered Russia up to 20 billion U.S. dollars to destroy stocks of military plutonium and chemical weapons and to secure weapons facilities.



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B.  US-Russia

1.
USA and Iran Alternate in Moscow
Alexander Reutov
Kommersant
10/24/2005
(for personal use only)


Today, Moscow is hosting the talks between Russian top officials, including President Vladimir Putin, and the U.S. president�s national security advisor Stephen Hadley. Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki also arrives in Moscow today. He will meet his Russian counterpart Sergey Lavrov. The overlapping of the two visits is no accidental. Washington is determined to convince Moscow that severe sanctions against Iran are necessary. Moscow, on the contrary, hopes to make Teheran compromise, which would deprive the United States of the reasons for anti-Iranian actions at the UN Security Council.

Washington is in a hurry. The Kremlin received the U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice less than a week ago, and now Stephen Hadley, another top-ranking official from the U.S. administration, arrives in Moscow. The talks will focus again on the Iranian nuclear crisis and Washington�s determination to act promptly against the country. The States plans to start from imposing strict international sanctions by the UN Security Council. But Russia may stand in the way as it has quite a tangible financial interest in Iran. Moscow has been executing a multi-billion-dollar contract since 1990s constructing a nuclear power plant in Busher.

Meanwhile, it is the Iranian nuke program that Washington uses as an illustration of Teheran�s aggressive intentions. The United States is convinced that Iranians are developing nuclear weapons under cover of the nuclear energy projects. The evidence is Teheran�s unwillingness to fully cooperate with the IAEA and the breakdown of the negotiations between Iran and Euro 3 (the UK, Germany and France). Europeans tried to convince Iran to give up their programs on the uranium enrichment at nuclear facilities in Natanz. A couple of months ago, when the negotiations between the Euro 3 and Teheran were in full swing, Washington made it clear that it views the resumption of the enrichment in Natanz as the bottom line in the Iranian issue. Teheran disregarded that warning, though. Iranians claim that the Natanz plant is used to produce nuclear fuel. However, the experts agree that the plant�s facilities can be used to output the filing for nuclear charges.

Basing on the information of the intelligence, Washington believes that Iran will be able to produce nuclear charges in a year or two. At the same time, Iran is developing means to deliver these charges. Stephen Hadley will probably present the Russian authorities today with the information on Iran�s development of weapons of mass destruction in an effort to persuade Moscow that if the international community does not take actions, a large part of the Russian territory will be soon at the aim of Iranian missiles.

Yet, Moscow is still skeptical about the American warning of the Iranian nuke threat. Russia likes to repeat that before the invasion in Iraq Washington also referred to its intelligence and scared the world with Saddam Hussein�s WMD which no one saw in the end. As yet, Russia seems to be even more active than Iran at defending the peaceful purpose of the country�s nuke program, and is coming up with initiatives that could shield Iran. For instance, as a compromise, Russia suggests that Teheran abandon the independent enrichment of uranium. Moscow is ready to set up a joint venture with Teheran in Russia, in exchange, to enrich uranium to supply the Iranian nuclear energy systems. The trouble is that Teheran has not been enthusiastic so far in the proposal and stands firmly on its right to produce nuclear fuel on its own.

Russia also hopes to get around Teheran to announce at least a partial cut in the uranium enrichment, for example a 50-70 percent, or even more. If the Iranians embrace the idea, Moscow is ready to promise Iran to expand the military and technical cooperation as a bonus, primarily, a deep modernization of the Iranian anti-missile aircraft system, as Kommersant learnt.

But still Russian experts admit that Iran�s half-and-half measures to cut the uranium enrichment will hardly be sufficient for the United States and the Euro 3 that has already lost patience. Consequently, sooner or later Teheran will have to agree to more drastic concessions, otherwise the situation will take a more dramatic turn. This idea will be a key one at the talks between the Russian authorities and Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki who arrives in Moscow today. Russia does not expect a quick answer to its suggestion, since Mr. Mottaki is at the bottom of the Iranian power pyramid and does not take any decisions. On the other hand, Teheran does not have time to ponder since the Unites States is going to send the question of the Iranian nuclear program from the IAEA�s competence to the UN Security Council.

Until then, as Kommersant learnt, Moscow intends to convince Teheran to compromise. Igor Ivanov, the head of the Russian Security Council, will visit Iran in two or three weeks. He will have to ask the question point-blank: if Iran does not compromise, Russia will wash its hands of it, and then no one will prevent the United States from carrying out its plan of the settlement of the Iranian nuclear crisis.

Washington, certainly, sees Russia�s financial interest in the Busher project and considers offering Moscow indemnity. Under the American scheme, Russia will back sanctions against Iran at the Security Council of the UN, but the resolution will mention that the embargo does not apply for the Russian project at the Busher nuclear power plant and Russian long-term plans to build other nuke power stations in Iran. Even if Stephen Hadley does not mention this at today�s talks, the Russian party might as well hint to Mr. Mottaki of this possible development of the events. So, by Igor Ivanov�s visit, Iranians may be already perfectly willing to crawfish.


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2.
Proliferation Analysis: Megatons to Megawatts
Ben Bain
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
10/20/2005
(for personal use only)


One-tenth of America�s electricity comes from fuel made from Russian nuclear warheads. The Megatons to Megawatts program converts highly-enriched uranium in Russian weapons into low-enriched uranium that is used in US civilian nuclear power reactors. The program reached an important milestone in early October - converting 255 metric tons of warhead material, the equivalent of over 10,000 weapons.

The goal of Megatons to Megawatts is to complete conversion of 500 metric tons of HEU. The program is set up to be commercially sustainable, thus taxpayers are not burdened with any costs. The nuclear warheads are dismantled, the HEU is diluted in Russia, and then the resulting LEU is purchased by the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) and distributed to various power utility customers who then use the fuel to generate electricity. The program is on schedule to complete its mission by 2015.

In addition, USEC has teamed up with the US Department of Energy for the conversion and sale to reactors of 64 metric tons of excess US military HEU. The US Megatons to Megawatts program is scheduled for completion in 2006. The LEU fuel converted from US weapons is enough to power a 1,000-megawatt reactor for about 52 years, generating enough electricity for a city the size of Boston for 43 years.

The Carnegie report Universal Compliance notes that the targeted Russian fissile material that has yet to be down-blended "remain[s] in weapon-usable form, to say nothing of the remaining Russian stockpile--which may amount to an additional 500 metric tons under uncertain security." The report recommends that "downblending needs to be accelerated to ensure the fastest possible elimination of this material. Russia and the United States should agree to double the pace from 30 to 60 metric tons of HEU per year."


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3.
Russian Non-Proliferation Delegates Visit National Labs and Meet U.S. Counterparts in Washington, DC Through Open World Program
PRNewswire
10/20/2005
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON -- A delegation of Russian nuclear energy researchers, practitioners and experts will visit Washington, DC from October 22 - 26 on the Congressionally sponsored Open World Program to learn about American nonproliferation activities and meet with U.S. Government specialists who work on nuclear weapons proliferation issues. Their arrival follows visits to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington State and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, where the delegates -- split into two groups -- met with their counterparts in the American nuclear science community from October 14 - 22.

The delegates range from state inspectors of nuclear facilities to civil engineers and researchers at security-focused think tanks. They come from a variety of locations within the Russian Federation and an array of professional institutions that includes government and private research organizations, non-governmental organizations and the media. Their visit is focused on issues such as nuclear materials monitoring techniques, international materials protection, control and accounting, environmental protection and clean-up, and economic diversification in communities once reliant on the government defense sector for their prosperity.

"Since the program's inception in 1999, Open World's primary goal has been to build mutual understanding between young political, civic and economic leaders in Russia and other participating countries and their American counterparts," said Aletta Waterhouse, Interim Executive Director of Open World. "By now helping to build bridges between the non-proliferation communities of Russia and the United States, our program adds a crucial new element toward forging a stronger understanding between our two countries on the whole."

While in Washington, D.C., the Russians will meet with staff of the Senate Foreign Relations and Armed Services Committees, the U.S. State Department, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Monterey Institute of International Studies and Russian American Nuclear Security Advisory Council to discuss the formulation and funding of government nonproliferation policy.

Battelle, which operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy, is coordinating the visit for Open World and leading an international partnership of organizations and individuals to create a high-impact program demonstrating and sharing the extensive U.S. experience of work in the field of nonproliferation with Russian counterparts. Each partner brings a particular expertise to the program, providing a diverse and interconnected view of this complex field of work. For more information about PNNL, please visit http://www.pnl.gov; for more information about ORNL, please visit http://www.ornl.gov.

Open World is a unique, nonpartisan initiative of the U.S. Congress that builds mutual understanding between the emerging leaders of participating countries and their U.S. counterparts while exposing delegates to ideas and practices they can adapt for use in their own work. Founded in 1999 with a focus on Russia, the program expanded in 2003 to include pilot exchanges with Lithuania, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. Delegates range from members of parliament to mayors, from innovative nonprofit directors to independent journalists, and from political party activists to regional administrators. The program's administering agency, the Open World Leadership Center, is a legislative branch entity with offices at the Library of Congress.

For more information on the Open World Program, please visit http://www.openworld.gov.
Press Release Source: Open World Program


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C.  Russia-Iran

1.
Russia tries to break impasse with Iran
Daniel Dombey, Neil Buckley and Gareth Smyth
Financial Times
10/25/2005
(for personal use only)


Russia said on Monday it would seek to resolve the impasse over Iran's controversial nuclear programme, in a sign of Moscow's increasing importance in international attempts to broker a deal with Iran.

On a day of intensive diplomacy in Moscow, Sergei Lavrov, Russian foreign minister, saw both Manouchehr Mottaki, his Iranian opposite number, and Stephen Hadley, the US national security adviser.

"We agreed to continue contacts on this question and work on a settlement together with other countries, in particular the EU3 [of France, Germany, and the UK]," Mr. Lavrov said after his meeting with Mr. Mottaki.

While the US and the European Union suspect Iran of seeking to develop nuclear weapons, Tehran denies having any such intention.

But negotiations between the EU3 and Iran broke down after Tehran rejected a European proposal in August and resumed work on uranium conversion, a preliminary part of the nuclear cycle it had previously suspended as part of a framework deal.

The prospect of direct EU-Iranian talks has since faded, because of disagreement over the Europeans' insistence that Iran stop all conversion once again. However, Iran has maintained a freeze on uranium enrichment a process that can produce weapons-grade material.

Attention has now shifted to Russia's attempt to break the deadlock.

Moscow has floated the idea that rather than use Iranian territory to carry out uranium enrichment, Tehran could do so as part of an international joint venture on Russian soil.

While the EU appeared to reject the Russian proposal several months ago, today they are asking for more details and even the US has indicated interest.

"The Russians...want to do what we all want to do, which is they want to pursue a diplomatic path and see if the Iranians will come along," said Condoleezza Rice, US Secretary of State, at the weekend.

However, it is by no means certain that the Russians can produce a mutually satisfactory solution.

On Monday Mr. Mottaki said that even if its nuclear programme was referred to the UN Security Council, Iran would continue to fight for its right to develop nuclear power.


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2.
Russian, Iranian presidents favor political resolution of nuclear dossier within IAEA
RIA Novosti
10/25/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The Russian and Iranian presidents stressed the importance of resolving the problem of Iran's nuclear dossier by political means within the framework of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Kremlin press service said Tuesday.

Vladimir Putin and Mahmud Ahmadi-Nejad discussed the issue by phone ahead of the upcoming session of the IAEA Board of Governors scheduled for late November.

"The Russian president spoke in favor of promoting Iran's cooperation with the [International Atomic Energy] Agency in order to resume negotiations," the press service said. "The sides said that further development of Russian-Iranian relations met the interests of the two countries and would help maintain regional and international stability."


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D.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Natwar to push Russia on NSG
Dadan Upadhyay
India Express
10/24/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, OCTOBER 23: External Affairs Minister Natwar Singh, who is arriving here on October 25, will ask Russia to persuade the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) to open the door to civil nuclear cooperation with India.

According to diplomatic sources here, Singh will urge Moscow ��to do its bit�� to help New Delhi, keeping in mind the ��breakthrough�� that has been achieved, in principle, between India and the US on the issue.

Singh will be here for four days to co-chair the 11th session of Indo-Russian Inter-Government Commission (IRIGC) for trade, economic, scientific-technological and cultural cooperation.

��All this time, the Russians have been telling India that it must talk to the US. Now India has talked to them and it has achieved the breakthrough. So India�s expectation would be that Russia along with France capitalise on this and accelerate, within the NSG, the process of thinking and decision-making,�� the sources stressed.

Singh is scheduled to call on Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov, to lay the agenda for Indo-Russian summit at the highest level, in early December.

At the IRIGC session on October 26, the two sides will focus on energy and IT sectors, as two key levers, in order to give a powerful thrust to bilateral trade and economic ties. Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Zhukov will lead the Russian delegation.

Singh will also represent India at the fourth session of heads of government of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), on October 26, at the President Hotel. He will also attend a dinner hosted by Russian PM Mikhail Fradkov. India was granted observer status, along with Pakistan and Iran, at the summit of heads of state, in Astana, the Kazakh capital, last July.


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2.
Russia resumes talks on building Myanmar n-facility
webindia123.com
10/23/2005
(for personal use only)


Guwahati -- Russia has resumed talks on helping Myanmar build a nuclear research facility even as the biggest Russian arms trader is firming up plans to set up an office in capital Yangon, according to Burmese media reports.

Russia's atomic energy ministry, or Minatom, has that it has resumed talks with Myanmar's military government on developing a nuclear research facility at Kyaukse in Mandalay division, The Mizzima Journal available here reported.

Plans for the facility, to be built by Minatom, were shelved early this year after Russian officials said Myanmar's generals could not afford the project.

Meanwhile, Russian arms trader Rosoboronexport plans to open an office in Myanmar before the yearend, Mizzima, a journal published by Myanmarese dissidents in India, said in a separate report.

The state-owned company had announced its intention to have an office in Myanmar in November last year when its director general Sergei Chemezov told reporters that new offices in Belgium, Myanmar, Italy and Venezuela were on the cards.

A spokesman for Minatom told Mizzima final discussions were being held on the price and financing of the nuclear research facility. "The government of Myanmar has enough money I think, so we will continue our negotiations," the spokesman said.

Minatom will not be involved in building the 10MW pool-type nuclear research reactor but will supervise and provide necessary fuel for it.

Myanmar's plans to build the facility were first announced in 2002 when former foreign minister Win Aung told BBC the country planned to build the reactor for medical purposes.

Most Asian countries have at least one research reactor - only Burma, Laos and Cambodia do not possess such facilities.

Mizzima, however, reported many international observers, including the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US were reportedly worried about Myanmar's ability to maintain such a facility to international safety standards.

Myanmar has had a long history of arms trading with Russian companies, buying fighter jets and hand-held weapons from various Russian dealers.


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3.
Russian company delivers 20 nuclear cartridges to Prague reactor
RIA Novosti
10/21/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Russian corporation TVEL delivered 20 cartridges of low-enriched nuclear fuel to the Vrabec research nuclear reactor in Prague, the company's press service said Friday.

The fuel will enhance the safety of the reactor, which is used by Czech university students and scientific personnel.

TVEL develops, produces, and sells nuclear fuel. It also runs sister affiliates, Russian nuclear cycle enterprises.


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E.  Nuclear Safety

1.
European Commission to grant Armenia food and nuclear security aid
Gamlet Matevosyan
RIA Novosti
10/25/2005
(for personal use only)


YEREVAN - The European Commission will donate $20 million to Armenia for the 2005-2006 Food Security Program, a senior European official said Tuesday.

Torben Holtze, the head of the European Commission delegation to the Caucasus republics of Armenia and Georgia, said the funds would be spent on agriculture, welfare, and statistical services. He said the commission had stopped funding Armenia's land reform because the five-year program to map the republic's arable lands had been completed.

Armenia has been receiving European grants under the Food Security Program, which covers four spheres - agriculture, land reform, welfare, and statistics - since 1996.

Another 5-7 million euros will be granted to Armenia in 2006-2007 to ensure the security of its nuclear power plant, Holtze said. Commissioned in 1980, the plant was shut down for political reasons in 1989 but reopened in 1995 during an acute energy crisis in Armenia.

Holtze said the commission was not insisting on closing the plant but rather enhancing its security, which has been the commission's policy toward all first-generation plants in other emerging democracies.

Outfitted with a Russian-made first-generation reactor, the plant's second unit generates up to 40% of Armenia's overall power output and can remain operational until 2016, experts estimate. Since 1993, the republic has received a total of $80 million to improve security at the plant.

Since September 2003, the plant has been run by an affiliate of Unified Energy Systems and Rosenergoatom, Russia's major electricity producers and its trust managers for a five-year period.

The EU has said the plant should be shut down temporarily and it would be willing to provide 100 million euros in funding. Armenian experts, however, said building alternative power facilities would require nearly a billion euros.


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2.
Duma ratifies Convention on Safe Management of Spent Fuel
ITAR-TASS
10/21/2005
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The Russian State Duma has ratified at its Friday plenary meeting the Joint Convention on the Safe Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste. President Putin had submitted a bill on its ratification to the lower house. On behalf of the Russian Federation the Convention was signed in Vienna on January 27, 1999. Its signatories today number thirty-four countries, including such leading nuclear powers as Great Britain, Germany, Spain, USA, Finland, France, Sweden, and Japan. Twenty-one of them have nuclear power plants.

Acting Head of the Russian Federal Ecology and Nuclear Control Service Andrei Malyshev stressed that this document "is called upon to provide effective means of protection from potential dangers at all the stage of the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste." The Convention, he noted, lists the obligations of all the sides concerned to guarantee the safe management of spent fuel from the nuclear plants used for peaceful purposes. Its ratification "will contribute to our broader interaction with foreign partners within the framework of international cooperation in the use of atomic energy," Malyshev stated.

At the same time, Head of the Duma Committee on Ecology Vladimir Grachyov noted that the Convention "could serve as the basis for drawing up Russian legal acts, relating to problems of guaranteeing the safe management of spent fuel, especially a bill "On the Management of Radioactive Waste."


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F.  Official Statements

1.
Mikhail Kamynin, the Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Answers a Media Question Regarding Themes of the Talks Between Foreign Ministers Sergey Lavrov of Russia and Manuchehr Mottaki of Iran on October 24, 2005
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
10/25/2005
(for personal use only)


Question: According to a report of the ITAR-TASS News Agency, citing a "diplomatic source," in the course of the talks held in Moscow on October 24 between the Foreign Ministers of Russia and Iran the question of constructing in Iran new nuclear power plants in the light of the adoption this past spring by the Iranian Majlis of a decision to build 20 new power units was expected to be discussed. How could you comment on this report?

Answer: In the course of the meeting between Sergey Lavrov and Manuchehr Mottaki this theme was not touched on. The content of the Russian-Iranian talks was reflected in the joint press conference of the Foreign Ministers of Russia and Iran immediately after their working meeting.


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2.
PRESS RELEASE: Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov Meets with Stephen Hadley, Assistant to the US President for National Security Affairs
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
10/25/2005
(for personal use only)


On October 24, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov received visiting Assistant to the US President for National Security Affairs Stephen Hadley.

The current international security agenda, inter alia nonproliferation, and some topical aspects of the situation in the world, including the Middle East region, were discussed. The sides also touched on issues in Russian-American relations from the angle of the development of the bilateral political dialogue and mutual engagement.


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3.
Transcript of Remarks by Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov at Press Conference Following Talks with Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Manuchehr Mottaki, Moscow, October 24, 2005
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
10/24/2005
(for personal use only)


Foreign Minister Lavrov: Esteemed colleagues,

In development of the meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in New York this past September we examined all the areas of Russian-Iranian bilateral relations, including the political dialogue as well as concrete aspects of our further trade-and-economic cooperation.

We discussed our further engagement in the Caspian, where the interests of Russia and Iran are very close or coincide. We want the Caspian to be a sea of cooperation, security and peace, and that any attempts at contraband be prevented in it, including contraband of sensitive and dual-use materials which may have a bearing on WMD development. We agreed on further steps to be taken in order to ensure such a regime for the Caspian by the forces of the Caspian states.

We also considered engagement within the framework of the SCO and exchanged views on the situation in the Middle East, in particular in Iraq, around Syria and Lebanon and in Afghanistan, where we are brought closer by our common objective of combating the narco-threat.

Of course, we discussed the situation around the Iranian nuclear program too. Our common position is that it is necessary to continue resolving all the questions that arose in this connection through the IAEA and thus search for a mutually acceptable solution which, on the one hand, would ensure the lawful rights of Iran as regards access to peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and on the other, would leave no doubts about the peaceful character of such activities. We agreed to continue contacts on this matter and to work on its solution together with other countries, including the European trio.


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G.  Items of Interest

1.
Nuclear Official: �Everything Should be Transparent�: Grigory Pasko interviews Sergei Antipov, deputy head of Rosatom, Russia's federal nuclear-power agency, about the decommissioning of nuclear submarines and the role of civil society in the process.
Grigory Pasko
Bellona Foundation
10/25/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.bellona.no/en/international/russia/nuke_industry/co-operation/404..


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2.
Nuclear Confusion: Does George Bush want to curb proliferation or court allies? He can't easily do both
Economist
10/20/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.economist.com/world/na/displaystory.cfm?story_id=5061437


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3.
Russian, U.S. admirals talk to save sub: KSG Executive Program forged ties that saved lives
Alvin Powell
Harvard University
10/20/2005
(for personal use only)
http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2005/10.20/01-sub.html


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