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Nuclear News - 6/8/2004
RANSAC Nuclear News, June 8, 2004
Compiled By: RANSAC Staff


A.  G-8 Global Partnership
    1. A Test of Leadership On Sea Island , Sam Nunn and Michele Flournoy, Washington Post (6/8/2004)
    2. Mechanism of G8 financial assistance to countries wrong - Kremlin, ITAR-TASS (6/7/2004)
    3. Russians Protest Plutonium Program at U.S. Embassy, MosNews (6/7/2004)
    4. We Need a Global Attack on Nuclear Proliferation, Madeleine Albright and Robin Cook, Los Angeles Times (6/7/2004)
    5. G8 Summit to Discuss Nuclear-Safety Issues , RIA Novosti (6/5/2004)
B.  G-8 Summit Nonproliferation Agenda
    1. G8 Summit Likely to Tighten Curbs on Nuclear Arms (excerpted), Caren Bohan, Reuters (6/8/2004)
    2. Russian Foreign Ministry: G8 Decisions on WMD Non-Proliferation Should Not Draw New Separating Lines, RIA Novosti (6/7/2004)
    3. US President Wants to Change G8 Summit's Format , RIA Novosti (6/5/2004)
C.  Counterproliferation
    1. Editorial: WMD effort enhanced by Russian cooperation , San Antonio Express-News  (6/6/2004)
D.  Threat Reduction Expansion
    1. Seoul wants Kyiv's experience in giving up nuclear weapons, Interfax (6/8/2004)
E.  US-Russia
    1. Russian-US Leaders May Discuss Any Topics, Condoleeza Rice , RIA Novosti (6/7/2004)
F.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy
    1. Putin: Moscow, Mexico City share approaches to int'l relations (excerpted), ITAR-TASS (6/8/2004)
G.  Russia-Iran
    1. Ambassador says military cooperation with Russia is defensive, Interfax (6/7/2004)
H.  Russia-India
    1. Russian help has guaranteed �high quality� in TN power plant, India Express (6/5/2004)
I.  Nuclear Industry
    1. Putin and Fox pledge to increase trade and cooperation (excerpted), Morgan Lee, Associated Press (6/8/2004)
J.  Nuclear Forces
    1. Russian strategic bomber to visit U.S. for first time, Interfax (6/4/2004)
K.  G-8 Summit Statements
    1. Interview Granted by Alexander Yakovenko, the Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to Foreign Correspondents Accredited in Moscow Concerning the Upcoming G8 Summit at Sea Island (excerpted), Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (6/8/2004)
    2. Press Briefing by Jim Wilkinson, Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Communications, and Barry Bennett, Deputy of Communications, G8 Summit Planning Organization (excerpted), The White House (6/8/2004)
    3. Press Briefing by Jim Wilkinson, Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Communications and Barry Bennett, Director of Communications, G8 Summit Planning Organization (excerpted), The White House (6/7/2004)
    4. Press Briefing by National Security Advisor, Dr. Condoleezza Rice on the G8 Summit (excerpted), The White House (6/7/2004)
L.  Official Statements
    1. Fact Sheet: Open Skies Treaty -- First Russian Observation in the United States, Bureau of Arms Control, Department of State (6/7/2004)
    2. Opening Remarks by Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov at the Regular Session of the Russian MFA Scientific Council "On the Urgent Foreign Policy Tasks of Russia" Held on May 31, 2004 (excerpted), Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (6/7/2004)
    3. Outcomes of the ROK-Ukraine Foreign Ministers' Talks (excerpted), Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea (6/7/2004)
M.  Links of Interest
    1. [The Global Partnership in a Crowded G-8 Agenda], Vladimir Orlov, PIR-Center for Policy Studies in Russia (6/8/2004)
    2. A Nuclear Nonproliferation Strategy for the 21st Century, Center for American Progress (6/7/2004)
    3. The Bush Administration's Nonproliferation Policy: An interview with Assistant Secretary of State John S. Wolf, Arms Control Today (6/7/2004)
    4. The Proliferation Security Initiative: Can Interdiction Stop Proliferation?, Jofi Joseph, Arms Control Today (6/7/2004)
    5. Nuclear Nonproliferation: DOE's Effort to Close Russia's Plutonium Production Reactors Faces Challenges, and Final Shutdown Is Uncertain, General Accounting Office (6/4/2004)
    6. The Sea Island Agenda, Center for Strategic and International Studies (6/4/2004)
    7. Assessing the International Response to the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator , Brett L. Marvin, Strategic Insights (6/1/2004)
    8. Statement to the 2004 Nuclear Suppliers Group Plenary Meeting, John Bolton, Department of State (5/27/2004)



A.  G-8 Global Partnership

1.
A Test of Leadership On Sea Island
Sam Nunn and Michele Flournoy
Washington Post
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


The Group of Eight leaders who are meeting in Sea Island, Ga., this week face a historic test of leadership. In the wake of the Madrid bombings and warnings that al Qaeda is planning attacks in the United States, this summit must produce more than the usual photo opportunities and joint statements. Its success should be measured in large part by whether the G-8 leaders take concrete and urgent steps to reduce the risk of catastrophic terrorism.

Unfortunately, the risk that terrorists could acquire and use nuclear, chemical or biological weapons is all too real. Over time, and without our decisive intervention, al Qaeda could become the world's 10th nuclear power. The terrorist organization has made several attempts to acquire uranium that could be used to make a crude nuclear device, and documents discovered at an al Qaeda safe house in 2001 showed an understanding of nuclear weapons design. The hardest part for the terrorists is getting the plutonium or highly enriched uranium necessary to build a bomb. Making that impossible should be our goal.

At their 2002 summit the G-8 leaders launched a Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, in which they pledged $20 billion -- $10 billion from the United States, $10 billion from others -- over 10 years to reduce the risk of catastrophic terrorism. Two years after this global security breakthrough, they are $3 billion short of their pledges, and only a tiny fraction of the $17 billion pledged has been appropriated for programs. Disputes between Russia and donor countries over tax issues, liability questions and site access have slowed implementation.

As a result, less than one-quarter of Russia's nuclear bomb-making materials -- hundreds of metric tons of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) -- has been adequately secured against theft or diversion. Globally, there are still more than 130 nuclear research reactors and other facilities in 40 countries using or storing weapons-usable HEU, and many of these facilities have only the most rudimentary security measures.

The problem is not confined to unsecured nuclear materials. Millions of portable artillery shells and hundreds of missile warheads filled with deadly nerve agents await destruction at dilapidated facilities in Russia. Construction of a U.S.-funded destruction plant was delayed for three years by political and compliance disputes, and current destruction plans will take more than a decade to implement. In the meantime, one stolen shell could be used to kill tens of thousands of people in Washington, New York, London, Paris, Tokyo or Moscow.

In addition, Russian military and civilian research facilities still have deadly pathogen collections; we don't know exactly what kind they are, how many there are or how secure they are. Thousands of former weapons scientists and workers in Russia remain underpaid or unemployed, making them more vulnerable targets for recruitment by terrorist organizations.

Although significant work has begun in all these areas, projected completion dates stretch into the next decade and beyond. Given the concerted efforts of al Qaeda and possibly other terrorist groups to acquire nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, there is now a dangerous gap between the pace of our progress and the urgency of the threat. We are not accelerating these programs as if our lives depended on it. They do.

There are at least 10 steps that G-8 leaders could take at Sea Island to give us a chance of winning this race against terrorism:

1. Appoint a senior official in each government, with direct access to the president or prime minister, who is responsible and accountable for ensuring that terrorists do not acquire weapons of mass destruction. Empower this senior official to eliminate all obstacles to cooperation as quickly as possible.

2. Announce an intention to increase pledges to the global partnership above the $20 billion goal. This goal should be treated as a floor, not a ceiling.

3. Expand the global partnership to include all nations with weapons capability and weapons materials, specifically Pakistan, India, Israel and China.

4. Accelerate efforts to consolidate and secure weapons-usable nuclear materials worldwide.

5. Accelerate the demilitarization of Russia's stockpile of 40,000 tons of chemical agents and strengthen the security of all chemical weapon stocks awaiting destruction in Russia.

6. Take immediate steps to account for and secure dangerous biological pathogen collections across Russia and the former Soviet Union.

7. Initiate a global effort to combat both infectious diseases and biological terrorism.

8. Expand efforts to employ former weapons scientists and personnel in the former Soviet Union.

9. Presidents Bush and Putin should pledge to bilaterally increase the transparency, safety and security of all tactical nuclear weapons in and around Europe.

10. Bush and Putin should also announce a new initiative to make U.S. and Russian biological defense research efforts bilaterally transparent as a confidence-building measure to enable greater cooperation in the biological arena.

This is not a list of impossible dreams; these are global security imperatives. Taking these steps will require the personal commitment and persistent action of the presidents of the United States and Russia, the leaders of the G-8 and other countries around the globe. The clock is ticking.


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2.
Mechanism of G8 financial assistance to countries wrong - Kremlin
ITAR-TASS
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


The leaders of the G8 countries at the June 8-10 summit will, by tradition, make decisions to disburse several hundred million dollars in aid to other countries. However, there are no clear liabilities as to the amount of aid each of the G8 member-states is expected to provide.

�If there is consensus, the leaders of the world�s leading industrialized nations must contribute certain shares, and not throw in as much as each individual country deems enough,� a source in the Russian presidential staff said.

The official described the established practice as very wrong.

�Initiatives are many, it might be a good idea to think up a rational criterion to compute each country�s contribution to the common cause, for instance the size of the GDP, level of development, government incomes, etc,� the Kremlin official said.

However, none of such proposals has met with a favorable response from the other members of the G8 group.

�Naturally, each country, although all of them are in the same club, have their own national interests, and this is precisely why one country participates actively in this or that initiative, and the other shows little interest, if at all,� the source said.

Due to this type of approach far from all programs are implemented to the full. For instance, the global partnership program, adopted in Kananaskis two years ago, provides for the disbursement of 20 billion dollars over a period of ten years to help Russia eliminate weapons of mass destruction and delivery vehicles.

The funds that have been made available so far constitute a mere seven percent of the funds due to have been transferred. Germany has been the most active financier of this program. The United States� financing is very moderate.

This summit is expected to decide to allocate 200 million dollars for the full elimination of poliomyelitis in the world.


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3.
Russians Protest Plutonium Program at U.S. Embassy
MosNews
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


Russian ecologists protested Tuesday�s G8 meeting in front of the U.S. Embassy Monday, calling on the United States and Russia to abandon a plan for plutonium utilization between the two countries.

The protesters, numbering up to ten people, briefly protested outside the embassy at about noon Monday, holding up banners calling on the G8 not to finance plutonium production.

Several dozen journalists were also present, a MosNews correspondent reported. Police became involved in the demonstration soon after it started, confiscating the banners. They took two demonstrators aside for questioning, but they were released.

The demonstration lasted several minutes before the police intervened.

Ecologists from the �Ecoprotection� group are concerned that the $8 billion joint program will increase the risk of nuclear disasters and plutonium contamination. They also fear the plutonium may get into the wrong hands and be used by terrorists.


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4.
We Need a Global Attack on Nuclear Proliferation
Madeleine Albright and Robin Cook
Los Angeles Times
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


The time has come to prevent the nightmare scenario of a nuclear attack. The rhetoric of international leaders about the spread of nuclear weapons and materials has not been matched by enough concrete action, even as Osama bin Laden declares that it is his "religious duty" to acquire and use a nuclear weapon against the West.

When the G-8 leaders meet Tuesday in Sea Island, Ga., we urge them to put aside their differences over Iraq and unite to implement a comprehensive nonproliferation strategy that includes concrete steps and increased financial commitments to control the spread of bomb-making materials and thwart the ambitions of those who would acquire them.

First, the G-8 nations � Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, Britain and the United States � must fulfill their pledge to raise $20 billion to fund the G-8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction. Still $3 billion short, this important effort helps Russia and other countries safely store and dispose of chemical and nuclear weapon materials.

Even if the pledges were fulfilled, there still would not be enough money to get the job done. Securing the nuclear legacy of Russia alone will cost $30 billion, and there are other stockpiles of inadequately secured highly enriched uranium and weapons-grade plutonium around the world.

Presidents Bush and Vladimir V. Putin have launched a program designed to secure fissile materials around the world. But their plan will take 10 years to complete, during which time terrorists will still be able to collect fissile materials for a bomb.

Our second recommendation therefore is that the G-8 should commit to a far more aggressive timetable � within the next four or five years � for completing this important work.

Third, the G-8 nations must bring to bear all the incentives and sanctions they have at their disposal to stop proliferation. This includes closing the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty loophole that enables states like North Korea to develop nuclear weapons under the cover of programs to produce nuclear energy.

Fourth, the G-8 leaders should pledge themselves to active, person-to-person diplomacy that can help reduce the regional tensions that could lead to the use of nuclear weapons. For example, the scaling back of the nuclear threat between India and Pakistan may have opened the door to further steps to reduce the risks of a nuclear exchange.

Fifth, the leaders must commit their nations to develop and maintain a global network linking intelligence and export control efforts with border, port and airport security to ensure that nuclear materials and technology cannot be moved undetected.

Finally, although France, Russia, Britain and the United States have taken good steps to reduce their nuclear arsenals, more must be done. A failure in this regard would encourage states that do not have nuclear weapons to rebel against nonproliferation norms out of dissatisfaction with what they perceive to be a double standard: Some states get nuclear weapons, while others do not. We call on President Bush and the United States, therefore, to stop developing new nuclear weapons such as the so-called bunker buster. The United States should also sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Together, the United States and Britain should support a fissile materials cutoff treaty that would end the production of fissile materials for use in nuclear weapons.

Given their nuclear weapons capacities, the U.S. and European countries have a special responsibility to ensure that these terrible weapons do not spread further. Before they can fulfill this responsibility, however, they must be seen as credible proponents of nuclear nonproliferation.

The steps described here would help restore credibility to the calls for global nuclear nonproliferation, and enable the U.S. and Europe to exercise the leadership that is so desperately needed to fight proliferation.

Imagine the G-8 meeting that would follow a nuclear incident. The leaders of the industrialized world would be compelled to explain how such a terrible tragedy could have happened. It is their challenge � and responsibility � to take the necessary steps now to protect us all.


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5.
G8 Summit to Discuss Nuclear-Safety Issues
RIA Novosti
6/5/2004
(for personal use only)


Denmark, Ireland, New Zealand and some other countries will join the G8 initiative aiming to help Russia ensure the safety of its nuclear materials.

This was disclosed to RIA Novosti here the other day by a high-ranking US Administration spokesman, who is taking part in pre-summit preparations. The forthcoming G8 summit will be held on Sea Island, Georgia.

The decision to increase the number of donor countries will be announced during a summit session dealing with non-proliferation issues, the Administration spokesman added.

This program, i.e. global partnership against the spread of weapons and materials of mass destruction, was first announced at the G8's Kananaskis summit in Canada (June 26-27, 2002).

At that time, G8 countries agreed to set aside $20 billion for Russia over a ten-year period, so that Moscow could ensure safe storage of nuclear, chemical and biological materials, also disposing of them properly. The United States was supposed to provide $10 billion, with all other member-countries contributing the rest.

Russia itself plans to set aside $2 billion for this program within the next decade.

Evian in France hosted the previous G8 summit in the summer of 2003, with G8 leaders agreeing to expand the number of global-partnership participants by incorporating interested donor countries, which are not G8 members, and which are ready to accept Kananaskis-summit documents.


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B.  G-8 Summit Nonproliferation Agenda

1.
G8 Summit Likely to Tighten Curbs on Nuclear Arms (excerpted)
Caren Bohan
Reuters
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


Leaders of the industrial world meeting for their annual summit are close to agreement on a plan to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, a senior U.S. official said Tuesday.

The official who spoke on condition of anonymity said a deal was "imminent" on a proposal that would, among other things, suspend for one year all new transfers of equipment for uranium enrichment and reprocessing.

The Group of Eight summit, hosted by President Bush behind moat-like security on Sea Island off the Georgia coast, is likely to be dominated by the future of Iraq and a U.S. push to promote democratic and economic reforms in the Middle East.

The official told reporters the weapons deal would include endorsement of a U.N. resolution to criminalize proliferation activity and would suggest reforms at the International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.N. nuclear watchdog.

Concern over the adequacy of current measures to prevent the spread of nuclear technology were raised earlier this year when it emerged that A.Q. Khan, the father of Pakistan's nuclear bomb, had helped North Korea, Libya and Iran with their arms programs.
The Bush administration aide said the deal agreed by the G8 -- the United States, Britain, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Japan and Russia -- would "suspend for one year all new transfers of enrichment and reprocessing technology (and) work to implement more permanent controls before the 2005 G8 summit."

At a separate briefing earlier, Jim Wilkinson, U.S. deputy national security adviser for communications, said the Sea Island summit would strengthen the IAEA watchdog role.

"I think you'll see that we're very close to agreement on new initiatives to dramatically expand the international community's efforts to go after (weapons of mass destruction)," he said.

"You will see an expansion of the PSI (proliferation security initiative)," he said. Under this initiative, law enforcement agencies of PSI countries would board suspect ships on the high seas and raid laboratories to seize possible caches of illegal weapons.

Although many of the G8 leaders will not arrive in Sea Island until later Tuesday, their aides have been hammering out the language of several initiatives.

[�]


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2.
Russian Foreign Ministry: G8 Decisions on WMD Non-Proliferation Should Not Draw New Separating Lines
RIA Novosti
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


G8 decisions in the area of mass destruction weapons (WMD) non-proliferation should not draw new separating lines, believes Alexander Yakovenko, Russian Foreign Ministry official spokesman.

Speaking with reporters, he pointed out that the G8 summit in Sea Island would allow the priority tasks on strengthening the applicable non-proliferation policies to be solved.

"It is important to implement them in such a way that they may not be interpreted by other countries as separating lines between the industrial and developing states, but on the contrary, that they unite the countries towards a common goal of preventing WMD spread, which equally threatens everybody", stressed the diplomat.

According to Mr. Yakovenko, in the face of new challenges and threats of great importance is establishment of additional effective barriers on the way of WMD spread in order to prevent terrorists' getting in possession of such weapons or their components.

Besides, Russia is striving for making this summit contribute to upbuilding the joint counter-terrorism potential. According to Mr.Yakovenko, a number of draft documents have been developed, which will increase the G8 joint efforts efficiency in the counter-terrorism area.

"In particular, it will relate to specific measures to counter transport terrorism and bioterrorism", said Mr.Yakovenko.

"I would like to mention that Russia has been actively participating in the development of a document on safe and simplified international travels procedures, which along with facilitation of the formalities involved in crossing the G8 national borders provides for introduction of the new generation of anti-terrorism security measures", added the Foreign Ministry spokesman.


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3.
US President Wants to Change G8 Summit's Format
RIA Novosti
6/5/2004
(for personal use only)


President George Bush Jr. of the United States, who will preside over the forthcoming G8 summit on Sea Island, Georgia, wants to change its format.

This was disclosed to reporters here the other day by a high-ranking US Administration spokesman, who is taking a direct part in pre-summit preparations.

The US President wants to lead the process of G8 summit away from the old-time paradigm, the spokesman told those present, also reminding his audience that previous G8 summits had issued some 30-40 concluding communiques each; one such document dealt with 70 to 80 issues.

This time, President Bush wants to scale down the summit agenda considerably, the Administration spokesman added.

We believe that the G8 summit should focus on a narrow range of issues, which have tremendous significance for the global situation, he stressed.

According to the spokesman, the US President believes that the G8 summit should be filled with real content, also aiming to implement specific action programs. The summit should mostly feature informal opinion exchanges.

Unlike previous G8 summits, the Sea Island summit will pass fewer documents.

Among other things, several action plans dealing with specific aspects of G8 work, i.e. the non-proliferation of mass destruction weapons, counter-terrorist operations, assistance to Third World countries, promoting Mideastern reforms, AIDS-prevention measures, etc., are to be drafted at the summit.

The summit president will issue a brief statement, as well, the spokesman noted in conclusion.


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C.  Counterproliferation

1.
Editorial: WMD effort enhanced by Russian cooperation
San Antonio Express-News
6/6/2004
(for personal use only)


A year ago in Krakow, Poland, President Bush announced a new international effort to halt the spread of weapons of mass destruction.

The Proliferation Security Initiative is now supported by more than 60 nations committed to stopping the flow of WMD technology in the air, on land and on the high seas.

Intelligence sharing and cooperation under the PSI is credited with rolling up the illicit network of Abdul Qadeer Khan. Khan, the father of Pakistan's nuclear bomb, is accused of selling WMD technology to Libya, North Korea and Iran.

The PSI also enabled the international effort that led Libya to renounce its WMD programs.

The great fear is that weapons of mass destruction will fall into the hands of non-state actors, terrorist groups intent on recreating the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States or the March 11 attacks in Madrid on an even more catastrophic scale.

The technology to create chemical, biological and nuclear weapons is menacingly accessible. In many countries it can be purchased off-the-shelf.

Russia's recent decision to join the security initiative, therefore, is an important development in the global effort to halt trafficking in WMD technology. The PSI will also be a major subject of discussion at next week's Group of Eight major industrialized countries meeting at Sea Island, Ga.

If Bush deserves the blame for misperceptions about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, he deserves credit for catalyzing the international community into action and forging a multilateral effort with the security initiative.


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D.  Threat Reduction Expansion

1.
Seoul wants Kyiv's experience in giving up nuclear weapons
Interfax
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


South Korea wants to study Ukraine's experience in becoming nuclear weapon free, South Korean President No Mu-hyon said at a meeting with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Kostyantyn Hryshchenko.

"We know Ukraine as a country that voluntarily gave up nuclear weapons, and we want to study your experience," spokesman for the Ukrainian Foreign Ministry Markiyan Lubkivsky quoted the Korean president as saying.

No Mu-hyun believes this experience could be used in the negotiating process on settling the nuclear problem on the Korean Peninsula, Lubkivsky told Interfax.

The Korean president praised Ukraine's achievements in building its economic and political systems, he said.

In the course of the talks, the parties agreed to intensify political dialogue at the top level and make efforts to expand cultural and humanitarian interaction, including to help preserve the cultural identity of ethnic Koreans living in Ukraine.


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E.  US-Russia

1.
Russian-US Leaders May Discuss Any Topics, Condoleeza Rice
RIA Novosti
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


The relations between the leaders of Russia and the US allow them to discuss any issues, US National Security Adviser Condoleeza Rice said. That was her comment on what topics could be raised at a meeting between Vladimir Putin and George Bush as part of the G-8 summit.

When speaking at a briefing in Savannah, Rice said that the two leaders had established very good relations. This is a great advantage that makes it possible to solve any questions, she added. Thus, she said, practically any topic can be discussed at the meeting.

Rice said Bush might necessarily want to be told about the successes Russia has had on the path of the economic reform at a meeting with the Russian leader.

On the whole, Rice said, the US is having good relations with Russia and Washington and Moscow are involved in a constant dialogue. She noted that Russia was a partner of the US in the anti-terrorist fight and in the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Russia, in particular, has played a major part in settling the dispute around North Korea's nuclear problem, the US National Security Adviser said.

Rice added that the US was interested in developing the energy dialogue with Russia who is a major supplier of energy resources.


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F.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy

1.
Putin: Moscow, Mexico City share approaches to int'l relations (excerpted)
ITAR-TASS
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

Mexico and Russia "will prioritise efforts to achieve further concrete results in the field of disarmament, specifically, in matters concerning weapons of mass destruction (WMD) as well as non-proliferation and arms control," says one of the joint statements signed here by Vladimir Putin of Russia and Vicente Fox Quesada.

The statement emphasises, "Proliferation, in all its aspects, of all types of WMD bring about a threat to peace and international security".

The sides reaffirmed, in particular, "The great importance of achieving universality and full implementation of the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and the entering into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty".

[�]


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G.  Russia-Iran

1.
Ambassador says military cooperation with Russia is defensive
Interfax
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


Russian-Iranian military cooperation is purely defensive in nature and has no aggressive goals, said Iranian ambassador to Russia Gholam Reza Shafei in an interview with Interfax on Monday.

"Military cooperation between our countries is conducted purely in the framework of the defensive doctrine of the Islamic Republic of Iran and for preserving the country's readiness to defend and ensure its national interests, and by no means has any aggressive intentions," Shafei said.

"As for nuclear weapons, here, as I already said, we have no intention of moving in this direction, or in having access to it," he said.

Shafei said that Russian and Iran are continuing their cooperation in nuclear energy and military sales in accordance with international norms and agreements.

"Certainly, such cooperation is accepted in the modern world, and is implemented within the natural right of countries to meet their needs, and these needs should be met by countries that have a higher technological potential," Shafei said.

"Tehran attaches great importance to relations with the Russian Federation," he said.

"It is also important because Russia has an independent position based on its national interests and opposes politicized and unrealistic approaches to world issues," Shafei said.

"Today we see that Russia's position is correct," he said.

"Another reason for developing relations between our countries is to oppose the use of double standards and the politicization of various issues arising in the world," he said.


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H.  Russia-India

1.
Russian help has guaranteed �high quality� in TN power plant
India Express
6/5/2004
(for personal use only)


Participation of Russian specialists in the construction of the USD three billion Kundankulam nuclear power plant in Tamil Nadu "guarantees high quality of work", an official supervising the project said today.

Under the joint effort, engineers from India go to Russia for further training and till now, they have showed "excellent performance", Director of the Kundankulam project Purohit said in Moscow after a meeting of a Russian-Indian coordination committee for training of specialists for the nuclear power plant.

Besides, over 300 highly experienced contractors from Russia are actively engaged in the project, Purohit said in an interview to Itar-Tass news agency.

The plant will meet most severe safety requirements, he said, adding, a special "trap" for localisation of radiation leaks will give the station the capability of internal self-protection.

Russian enterprises have already begun to supply equipment to the plant and the project is expected to get completed "according to schedule", Purohit added.


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I.  Nuclear Industry

1.
Putin and Fox pledge to increase trade and cooperation (excerpted)
Morgan Lee
Associated Press
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


Vladimir Putin, the first Russian head-of-state to visit Mexico, said Monday the two major oil producing nations should share knowledge on oil exploration and the energy sector.

Putin said his nation's trade with Mexico is below what it should be and there was potential for cooperation also in nuclear energy and Russian help in building hydropower stations.

[�]


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J.  Nuclear Forces

1.
Russian strategic bomber to visit U.S. for first time
Interfax
6/4/2004
(for personal use only)


The Russian TU-95MS Bear strategic bomber will conduct a flight to the U.S. for the fist time, Colonel Alexander Drobyshevsky, head of the Air Force press-service, told Interfax-Military News Agency on Friday.

According to him, the strategic bomber's flight is timed to the 100th birthday of famous Russian test pilot Valery Chkalov to be celebrated on June 15-21.

"The ferry flight will be conducted along Chkalov's route from Russia to the U.S. via the North Pole," Drobyshevsky said.

He also noted that the TU-95MS would be refueled in the air over the Arctic Ocean outside the Novaya Zemlya archipelago by the IL-78 Midas tanker.

The TU-95MS is to fly from the Russian Air Force base in Engels to Portland, while the IL-78 from Anadyr airbase to Portland. The IL-78 will carry a delegation of Russian Air Force officials and various equipment for the bomber.

"It will be the first time Russian aircraft of this type visit the U.S.," he emphasized.


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K.  G-8 Summit Statements

1.
Interview Granted by Alexander Yakovenko, the Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to Foreign Correspondents Accredited in Moscow Concerning the Upcoming G8 Summit at Sea Island (excerpted)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


Question: What do you perceive as the principal tasks of the upcoming G8 Sea Island Summit?

Answer: The upcoming summit on June 8-10 at Sea Island, USA, of the leaders of the world's leading industrial nations is called upon to give new impetus to the cooperation of the Group of Eight in such priority areas for the world community as the fight against international terrorism, the strengthening of the WMD nonproliferation regimes, the settlement of international conflicts and assistance to sustainable economic development and to the solution of other global problems.

[�]

Russia is striving to ensure that the summit should also help to build up the joint potential of struggle against terrorism. In this connection a number of draft documents have been prepared that will help increase the effectiveness of the G8's common efforts on the antiterrorist front. In particular, we are talking about concrete measures to combat the threat of terrorism in transport as well as bioterrorism. I would like to note that Russia actively participated in the elaboration of a document on the secure and simplified procedure of international trips, which along with the facilitation of the formalities in crossing the national boundaries of the G8 countries also envisages new-generation antiterrorist security measures.

The Sea Island meeting can also help solve the immediate tasks in strengthening the existing nonproliferation regimes. It is important to so implement them that they are not perceived by other countries as the dividing lines between industrial and developing countries, but, on the contrary, unite countries in solving the common task of preventing the spread of WMDs, which is equally threatening all.

In the light of the challenges and threats, it is particularly important to create additional effective barriers in the path of the proliferation of WMDs with a view to preventing such weapons or their components getting into terrorists' hands.

[�]


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2.
Press Briefing by Jim Wilkinson, Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Communications, and Barry Bennett, Deputy of Communications, G8 Summit Planning Organization (excerpted)
The White House
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

Finally, on the issue of nonproliferation, you'll hear -- as a matter of fact, let me point out, you'll hear on all these issues today extensive briefings from our policy experts, for those of you who choose to attend.

On the issue of nonproliferation, I think you'll see we're very close to agreement on new initiatives to dramatically expand the international community's efforts to go after WMD. You will see an expansion of the PSI Initiative. You will see G8 leaders working to strengthen the IAEA with some reforms there. A lot of the things the President talked about in his February 11th speech on reforming our antiquated nonproliferation laws and statutes and organizations to address the global threats of the A.Q. Khan network and other global black market networks and regimes who choose to development these weapons in secret. You'll see a lot of these steps agreed to on that issue. I'll let Mr. Bolton make the news on that today.

[�]

Q Do you expect agreement on nonproliferation before Thursday?

MR. WILKINSON: Yes, it could have even happened overnight.

[�]


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3.
Press Briefing by Jim Wilkinson, Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Communications and Barry Bennett, Director of Communications, G8 Summit Planning Organization (excerpted)
The White House
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

On the issue of nonproliferation, you're all familiar with the PSI, the Proliferation Security Initiative the President has announced that led to great successes, including the success in intercepting the ship, the BBC China, which was full of the weapons bound for Libya. Those weapons components now sit safely in Oak Ridge, Tennessee at the Y-12 complex.

This week, we expect the G8 leaders to finalize new initiatives to counter the proliferation of WMD, including an expansion of the President's PSI initiative, which, as you know, would enhance military intelligence and law enforcement cooperation to shut down these proliferation networks.

You're all familiar with the AQ Khan network. We'll have Mr. Bolton from the State Department here and Bob Joseph as well from the NSC will be down here to do one-on-one interviews with you to talk about this issue. It's a very significant issue.

[�]


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4.
Press Briefing by National Security Advisor, Dr. Condoleezza Rice on the G8 Summit (excerpted)
The White House
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

Q A follow-up -- what issue do you expect to be raised in your bilateral meeting with President Putin in the coming few days, and what of those issues -- will be discussed in the broader --

DR. RICE: Well, we have a very good relationship, of course, with Russia, and we have a broad agenda. We have the strategic dialogue with Russia that covers a variety of issues. I think you can expect the two Presidents to talk about the importance of the war on terrorism. Russia has been one of the countries that understands fundamentally the war in which we find ourselves, because Russia has suffered at the hands of extremism in its very core, in Moscow. And so we will have that discussion.

We have very good work to do together on proliferation. Russia is a member of the six-party talks on North Korea and has been a good partner in that. We, of course, will have discussions of the energy dialogue. Russia is a major energy producer and, of course, we have had a very good dialogue, not just on production of fossil fuels, but also alternative sources of energy and the problems that arise for proliferation out of certain kinds of civilian uses of nuclear energy.

But the interesting thing about the relationship with Russia is it's so broad and so deep, the Presidents could talk about just anything on the map, and they probably will. They have a very good relationship. I think the President will want to hear from President Putin about his thinking about where Russia goes now on its domestic path. Obviously, there have been some very impressive economic gains and economic reforms made. The President has said on a number of occasions to President Putin that the democratic development of Russia is also extremely important to the future deepening of our relationship with Russia. And I would think that the two of them will have a discussion of what is happening to institutions in Russia as Russia tries to chart a path to a more democratic future.

[�]

Q Sure. We're hearing that Yasser Arafat has told Hosni Mubarak he accepts his demands for Palestinian security reforms. What's the significance of this? And also, could we draw you out a little bit about this counterproliferation initiative you talked about? Is that an expansion of the PSI, or what exactly?

DR. RICE: On the PSI, what we're really talking about is that, of course, we believe that Russia has made clear its intention to be involved in the core group. That's a very, very good step forward. There are also some steps being made by the leaders here at the G8 to work forward from the agenda the President put out when he spoke at the National Defense University a couple of months ago, on how to close the gap that is left -- the loophole that is left in the nonproliferation treaty by the fact that many states sign on to the nonproliferation treaty, pursue what are supposedly civilian uses of nuclear power, but, in fact, use that as a cover for producing or for pursuing military uses and perhaps nuclear weapons development. And the President had a number of agenda items about that; they're going to discuss that. I won't -- I don't want to prejudge or preempt what they're going to talk about, but I think you will see that we'll make some progress on the issues that the President raised at the National Defense University.

[�]


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L.  Official Statements

1.
Fact Sheet: Open Skies Treaty -- First Russian Observation in the United States
Bureau of Arms Control
Department of State
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


During the week of June 7, 2004, the Russian Federation and Republic of Belarus will conduct its first Open Skies Treaty observation mission over the territory of the United States. The Open Skies Treaty entered into force on January 1, 2002. Since entry into force, this is the first observation mission the U.S. is hosting under the Treaty. To date, the U.S. has conducted 10 observation missions over the territories of the Russian Federation and Republic of Belarus. Russia and Belarus are scheduled to conduct two observation missions over the U.S. this year.

The Russian TU-154 is an unarmed aircraft that was recently certified in accordance with Treaty provisions. It will arrive at Travis AFB, California (a designated point of entry into the U.S.), and the mission will commence from Elmendorf AFB, Alaska.

A U.S. escort team from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) will accompany the Russian team throughout the mission, including on-board the aircraft during the observation flight.

The Russian aircraft is equipped with optical cameras. The U.S. will receive a copy of the imagery collected during the mission. Other Open Skies States Parties may also purchase copies of the imagery from Russia.

The Russian team will negotiate a mission route of up to 3,750 kilometers. The Treaty allows Russia, as the observing Party, to image any point on the territory of the U.S. along the agreed flight plan.

For further information, please see fact sheets on the Open Skies Treaty at www.state.gov/t/ac or www.dtra.mil.


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2.
Opening Remarks by Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov at the Regular Session of the Russian MFA Scientific Council "On the Urgent Foreign Policy Tasks of Russia" Held on May 31, 2004 (excerpted)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

The developments around Iraq do not make for the strengthening of the unity of the antiterrorist coalition and they put many additional problems on the agenda, let alone the undermining of the foundations of the present world pattern, which rests on the Charter of the United Nations. There are ever more signs of the fact that many people are not averse from the around-Iraq events, or from the influence which the situation in Iraq exerts on present-day international relations, to draw the conclusion about the onset of an era of conflicts of civilizations. For our country such trends are extremely dangerous. In the same context new threats are emerging in the field of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, including those in direct proximity to our borders. It is necessary to search for a way out of this situation exclusively on a collective basis, without alienating any country but, on the contrary, carrying on our President's line on developing partner relations with all states which are interested in this and on achieving our aims through dialogue, not confrontation. Of course, this presupposes further efforts jointly with the leading countries of the world, aimed at collectively tackling world problems, which presupposes having the United States of America necessarily enlisted in collective actions as well.

[�]


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3.
Outcomes of the ROK-Ukraine Foreign Ministers' Talks (excerpted)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)


1. Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ban Ki-moon, held the ROK-Ukraine Foreign Ministers' Talks with Foreign Minister of Ukraine, Kostyantyn Ivanovych Gryshchenko, on June 7, and discussed ways to promote substantial cooperation between the two countries, the situation on the Korean Peninsula and major international issues of concern.

[...]

4. Minister Ban explained the situation on the Korean Peninsula including the North Korean nuclear issue, and Minister Gryshchenko explained Ukraine's experience in nuclear dismantlement and its foreign relations such as the recent situation in the CIS. The two ministers agreed to make mutual cooperation for the reconstruction and stability of Iraq.

[...]

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M.  Links of Interest

1.
[The Global Partnership in a Crowded G-8 Agenda]
Vladimir Orlov
PIR-Center for Policy Studies in Russia
6/8/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.pircenter.org/cgi-bin/pirnews/getinfo.cgi?ID=1329


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2.
A Nuclear Nonproliferation Strategy for the 21st Century
Center for American Progress
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.americanprogress.org/atf/cf/%7BE9245FE4-9A2B-43C7-A521-5D6FF2E06E..


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3.
The Bush Administration's Nonproliferation Policy: An interview with Assistant Secretary of State John S. Wolf
Arms Control Today
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2004_06/Wolf.asp


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4.
The Proliferation Security Initiative: Can Interdiction Stop Proliferation?
Jofi Joseph
Arms Control Today
6/7/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2004_06/Joseph.asp


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5.
Nuclear Nonproliferation: DOE's Effort to Close Russia's Plutonium Production Reactors Faces Challenges, and Final Shutdown Is Uncertain
General Accounting Office
6/4/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.216.119.87.134/documents/d04662.pdf


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6.
The Sea Island Agenda
Center for Strategic and International Studies
6/4/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.csis.org/features/040604_seaisland.pdf


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7.
Assessing the International Response to the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator
Brett L. Marvin
Strategic Insights
6/1/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.ccc.nps.navy.mil/si/2004/jun/marvinJun04.asp


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8.
Statement to the 2004 Nuclear Suppliers Group Plenary Meeting
John Bolton
Department of State
5/27/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.state.gov/t/us/rm/33121.htm


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DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of RANSAC. RANSAC takes no responsibility for the technical accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

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