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Nuclear News - 2/13/2004
RANSAC Nuclear News, February 13, 2004
Compiled By: Matthew Bouldin


A.  Nuclear Cities
    1. Russian Closed Cities To Produce Hi-Tech Civilian Products � Official, ITAR-TASS (2/12/2004)
B.  HEU Removal
    1. Experts: Program to Secure Enriched Uranium 'Slow', Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer, Philadelphia Inquirer (2/9/2004)
C.  Chemical Weapons Destruction
    1. Federation Council to discuss convention on prohibition of chemical weapons , RosBusinessConsulting (2/11/2004)
D.  Threat Reduction Expansion
    1. Pakistan May Sign NPT If Declared N-Power: Report , IRNA (2/13/2004)
    2. A Nuclear Mixed Message, Los Angeles Times (2/12/2004)
    3. Bush Proposes Strict Limits on Black Market Sale of Equipment to Make Nuclear Fuel, David E. Sanger, New York Times (2/12/2004)
E.  U.S. - Russia
    1. Moscow Is Dubious About US Global Missile Defense System, RIA Novosti (2/12/2004)
    2. Russia Seeks World�s Unity To Counter New Threats - Ivanov , ITAR-TASS (2/12/2004)
F.  Russia - Iran
    1. America Not To Elbow Russia Out Of Iran: Nuclear Power Minister, Alevtina Schepetina, RIA Novosti (2/12/2004)
    2. Iran, Russia Study Nuclear Cooperation , IRNA (2/12/2004)
    3. Russia's Nuclear Power Minister Puts Off Trip To Iran-For Technical Reasons, He Says, RIA Novosti (2/12/2004)
    4. Washington On Moscow's Decision, Alexander Bratarsky, RIA Novosti (2/12/2004)
G.  Russian Nuclear Forces
    1. Putin Insists On Necessity For Russia To Maintain Its Nuclear Weapons , RIA Novosti (2/12/2004)
    2. General Says Military Exercise Not Aimed at U.S., Associated Press (2/11/2004)
    3. Russian Armed Forces Continuing Command And Staff Drill, ITAR-TASS (2/11/2004)
    4. Russian Exercises Spurred by U.S. Nuclear Weapons Research, Russian General Says, Global Security Newswire (2/11/2004)
    5. Russia to Stage Nuclear Arms Safety Show for NATO , Reuters (2/10/2004)
H.  Russian Nuclear Industry
    1. Russian Specialized Concern Accomplishes 25 International Nuclear Security Projects In 2003, RIA Novosti (2/13/2004)
    2. Rosenergoatom Plans To Build Floating Nuke Station In China, ITAR-TASS (2/12/2004)
    3. Rosenergoatom, Electricite De France Implement 30 Big Projects, ITAR-TASS (2/12/2004)
    4. Ukraine, Russia To Extend Cooperation In Nuclear Power Industry , Interfax (2/9/2004)
I.  Nuclear Safety
    1. Containers Of Radioactive Cesium Discovered In Georgian City, ITAR-TASS (2/12/2004)
J.  Official Statements
    1. Article by Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov Published in the Newspaper Kommersant on February 13, 2004 under the Heading "Russia-USA: What Kind of Partnership?", Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (2/13/2004)
    2. Global Security in the 21st Century: New Challenges, New Partnerships (excerpted), Alexander Vershbow, Department of State (2/12/2004)
    3. On Russian President Vladimir Putin's Message to US President George W. Bush , Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (2/12/2004)
    4. Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Igor Ivanov Speaks to US Secretary of State Colin Powell by Telephone, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (2/12/2004)
    5. Fact Sheet: Strengthening International Efforts Against WMD Proliferation (excerpted), The White House (2/11/2004)
    6. Hoyer: President's Non-Proliferation Effort Requires More Than Rhetoric - The President's Budget Would Under-Fund Proven, Effective Non-proliferation Programs , Steny H. Hoyer , Office of the Democratic Whip (2/11/2004)
    7. Lugar welcomes President�s support of Nunn-Lugar expansion; Praises nonproliferation initiative (excerpted), Richard G. Lugar, Senator, Office of Sen. Richard Lugar (2/11/2004)
    8. Opening Statement for Hearing with Secretary Powell (excerpted), Richard G. Lugar, Senator, Office of Sen. Richard Lugar (2/11/2004)
    9. Remarks by the President on Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation (excerpted), The White House (2/11/2004)
    10. Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Igor Ivanov Speaks to Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Kamal Kharrazi by Telephone, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (2/11/2004)
    11. Ukrainian Foreign Ministry States That Al-Hayat Newspaper's Information about Ukraine's Turning Nuclear Ammunition over to Al-Qaida Terrorists is Absolutely Groundless, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine (2/10/2004)
    12. USA Suggests Compromise and Alternative Mode to Get Rid of Solid Propellents - George Bush's Letter, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine (2/9/2004)
    13. Ukraine-US Consultations On Non-Proliferation And Export Control Issues To Be Held Twice A Year, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine (1/28/2004)
K.  Links of Interest
    1. Saving Ourselves From Self-Destruction, Mohamed ElBaradei, New York Times (2/12/2004)
    2. MOX Plan Delayed By Bush Administration Budget Documents, Charles Digges, Bellona Foundation (2/11/2004)
    3. Upcoming EU Enlargement Revives Long-Standing Nuclear Battle, Soizick Martin; Charles Digges, Bellona Foundation (2/10/2004)



A.  Nuclear Cities

1.
Russian Closed Cities To Produce Hi-Tech Civilian Products � Official
ITAR-TASS
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


Moscow, 12 February: Quality civilian products will be produced in so-called "closed cities" of the Russian nuclear energy sector, Russian First Deputy Minister of Atomic Energy Igor Borovkov told an ITAR-TASS correspondent today after a visit to the Start production association in the town of Zarechnyy, Penza Region. According to Borovkov, the ministry set two tasks to the enterprise: "It should reinstate itself as the Atomic Energy Ministry's main enterprise implementing the state defence order, and the production of competitive hi-tech civilian products should be organized within the shortest possible deadline". In line with this approach the Atomic Energy Ministry "is also considering a merger of a number of enterprises in the town of Zarechnyy into a single scientific and production association which will manufacture hi-tech machinery and instruments". Borovkov stressed that one of the current global problems faced by the Start production association is "the lack of balance in the ratio of the main personnel and support staff". However, the Atomic Energy Ministry is against any reckless reductions in the personnel. "Not a single employee or worker in our sector will be left on their own and without our help," Borovkov said. Borovkov also said that during his trip to Zarechnyy "it was agreed with the region leadership that Start's redundant workers would be employed at industrial enterprises of the city of Penza, municipal enterprises of Zarechnyy and the chemical weapons destruction facility in the village of Leonidovka".

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B.  HEU Removal

1.
Experts: Program to Secure Enriched Uranium 'Slow'
Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Inquirer
2/9/2004
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON - A U.S. program to buy highly enriched uranium stockpiles from Russia is moving too slowly, experts warn, raising the specter of this material falling into the hands of terrorists.

"We are treating this in a workmanlike way, chipping away at the problem, when we should be racing towards a solution," said Michele Flournoy, a former Pentagon official who dealt with nuclear proliferation who is now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

To date, the U.S. has acquired about one-third of 500 tons of highly enriched uranium. Critics contend that the slow pace of the program accommodates commercial pressures at the expense of security.

Prominent scientists and nuclear experts believe the theft of this material would enable terrorists to construct with relative ease a nuclear bomb with the destructive force of the Hiroshima blast.

"The only barrier to producing a functioning nuclear bomb is the material," said Laura Holgate, a former Pentagon and Energy Department official.

The warning comes at a time when Pakistan is believed to have sold nuclear technology to Iran and while investigators for the International Atomic Energy Agency have said that Libya's hunt for nuclear weapons benefited from a black market that sold weapons designs, technical aid and critical hardware.

At the root of the problem is HEU - uranium in which the concentration of the isotope U-235 is 20 percent or more. As a practical matter, weapons grade HEU contains more than 90 percent U-235.

HEU, and not plutonium, is the only material that allows for the easy manufacture of crude nuclear explosives. Detection at border crossings or checkpoints is difficult due to the low levels of radiation emitted. For the same reason, the handling of HEU poses minimal health hazards.

"It is actually quite easy to manufacture a nuclear explosive device if there is a sufficient amount of HEU," said Francesco Calogero, a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Rome.

Calogero noted that, in contrast to a military weapon, a primitive nuclear bomb need not be transportable or sturdy or have any precise yield or security features.

One hundred kilograms of HEU "will be more than enough" to build a primitive device and smuggling this amount is relatively easy, amounting to less than 10 liters in volume - about the size of a small TV set.

Other experts say that about 50 kilograms is really all that is needed, and far less than that amount for a "very sophisticated" device. Such a device would have the destructive power of the 13-kiloton "Little Boy" bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.

Russia alone has more than one million kilograms of HEU.

Calogero and other well-known scientists, including Frank von Hippel of Princeton University, this month submitted a proposal to curtail the availability of HEU.

Albert Narath, former director of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., where nuclear weapons are manufactured, has written that only an effective worldwide system of controls of fissile materials can protect the world from nuclear terrorism.

"The technical barriers standing in the way of sub-national nuclear-weapon development are substantial but not likely to be insurmountable given sufficient time and resources," said Narath.

So what is being done to secure the world's stocks of HEU?

The largest amount of HEU that has not been used in a reactor is found in Russia, and the estimated stock is between 1,000 and 1,400 tons, or enough to make tens of thousands of nuclear warheads.

Less than 40 percent of the material potentially vulnerable to theft has been covered by physical security upgrades in Russia funded by the United States, according to a study by the federal General Accounting Office.

In 1993, the United States and Russia concluded an agreement whereby the United States agreed to buy 500 tons of HEU from Russia and dilute it to low-enriched uranium to be used as fuel in American nuclear reactors.

The program sputtered for the first several years - one official characterized its survival as akin to the "Perils of Pauline" movie serials - but finally got on track in 1998. About 170 tons of HEU - the equivalent of 8,000 nuclear warheads - has been converted, according to the Bethesda, Md.-based U.S. Enrichment Corp., a privatized company originally created by the government for this purpose.

Unfortunately, due to commercial considerations, the so-called "megatons to megawatts" program is stretched out over 20 years - concluding in 2013 - in order not to deflate the price of low-enriched uranium, Calogero said.

"It's the material, stupid," said Holgate, who now works for the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a non-profit foundation dedicated to reducing the threat from weapons of mass destruction.

Along with Russian and U.S. officials, NTI is exploring the possibility of taking another 30 tons per year of Russian HEU out of circulation, blending it down to below weapons-grade enrichment, and then storing it until it can be further de-enriched and sold to nuclear utilities worldwide. A decision on whether this is feasible is expected early next year, Holgate said.

Holgate frets that thieves or smugglers may eventually succeed in providing HEU to terrorists, who would certainly make a bomb.

"Terrorists like al-Qaida want to kill as many people as possible; they are not interested in a seat at the bargaining table," she said.

A senior administration official said that "hundreds of millions of dollars" would have to be allocated by congress to speed up the process. "We are doing as much as can prudently be done as a commercial matter," said the official.

A related but separate effort is being directed at the G-8's "Global Partnership," which pledged $20 billion over 10 years to prevent terrorists from acquiring weapons of mass destruction.

The process of moving from pledges to actual projects has been "frighteningly slow - a failure of political will by all parties," said Holgate.

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C.  Chemical Weapons Destruction

1.
Federation Council to discuss convention on prohibition of chemical weapons
RosBusinessConsulting
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


RBC, 11.02.2004, Moscow 09:57:22.Today, the Russian Federation Council will discuss the implementation of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, at its plenary meeting within a government hour. Deputy Prime Minister Boris Alyoshin is expected to deliver a report on this topic.

The upper house is also scheduled to consider a number of laws and amendments adopted by the State Duma.

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D.  Threat Reduction Expansion

1.
Pakistan May Sign NPT If Declared N-Power: Report
IRNA
2/13/2004
(for personal use only)


Islamabad, Feb 13, IRNA - Pakistan may consider signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) if the world community formally recognises Islamabad as the sixth member of the atomic club. "Islamabad`s entering into the international treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons as a non-nuclear state is out of question," reported The News daily in its Friday issues.

According to the paper, Pakistan is expected to be pressurised by the world community to sign the NPT in the backdrop of admissions thatsome of its nuclear scientists and officials had proliferated nuclear technology abroad.

The newspaper quoted an unnamed official source as saying that Pakistan could consider inking the treaty, provided it was given recognition as a declared nuclear power. Otherwise, there was no question of coming to the treaty fold.

The NPT acknowledges the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China as the nuclear weapon states called the atomic club. The treaty obligates these nations not to transfer nuclear weapons, other nuclear explosive devices, or their technology to any non-nuclear state.

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in a recent news conference had denied reports that Islamabad was under pressure to rollback its nuclear programme after disclosure of alleged leakage of N-assets abroad.

Contrary to that, some of the opposition parties in the Parliamentallege that the statesmen were in the process of rolling back the nuclear programme in order to remain in power.

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2.
A Nuclear Mixed Message
Los Angeles Times
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


In June 1963, John F. Kennedy famously declared that the United States would end above-ground testing of nuclear weapons and called for negotiations on a more comprehensive global test ban. "It would place the nuclear powers in a position to deal more effectively with one of the greatest hazards which man faces in 1963, the further spread of nuclear arms," he said.

President Bush offered a valuable reminder Wednesday that such weapons were "the greatest threat before humanity today" and far more widespread than in Kennedy's day, when the United States and the Soviet Union had the bomb and China soon would.

In a speech at Washington's National Defense University, Bush focused on the perils posed by governments like Iran's that may be seeking nuclear weapons but also by a more private black market impelled by "greed or fanaticism or both."

His speech will keep up the pressure on Iran to fully disclose its nuclear research and on Pakistan to unravel the network run by scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan, who was pardoned by President Pervez Musharraf after Khan admitted selling nuclear technology and knowledge. Bush also declared, "The world's leading nuclear exporters should ensure that states have reliable access � to fuel for civilian reactors, so long as those states renounce enrichment and reprocessing."

These proposals are beneficial, but their message is blurred because the administration is underfunding effective programs to curb proliferation. The 1992 Nunn-Lugar program of destroying Cold War-era Russian nuclear weapons to prevent them from falling into terrorist hands is scheduled in Bush's 2005 budget to drop to $409 million from $450.8 million this year.

The other side of the equation, upgrading U.S. weapons, is overfed. The administration wants to increase the potency of the nuclear stockpile, including development of "bunker busters" � battlefield nuclear weapons that would lower the nuclear-use threshold. The "Star Wars" missile defense system, unproven and concocted for a Cold War-style conflict, is to receive $10.7 billion. Neither would do anything to stop terrorists from detonating a nuclear bomb in a U.S. city.

The administration's National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction, released in December 2002, is based on the notion that the U.S. can enhance its missile force while asking the rest of the world not to build such weapons. But as nonproliferation expert George Perkovich notes in the current issue of Foreign Affairs, a double standard "seems destined to reduce international cooperation in enforcing nonproliferation commitments rather than enhance it."

After weeks of being pounded for intelligence failures, Bush wants to take the initiative again on foreign affairs. But he will have to think and act in larger ways to be effective in halting nuclear proliferation.

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3.
Bush Proposes Strict Limits on Black Market Sale of Equipment to Make Nuclear Fuel
David E. Sanger
New York Times
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON, Feb. 11 � President Bush on Wednesday proposed a seven-point plan to make it far more difficult to sell nuclear equipment on the black market, declaring that the ease with which North Korea, Iran and Libya received help from a Pakistani scientist showed that the United States must "prevent governments from developing nuclear weapons under false pretenses."

Speaking at the National Defense University, Mr. Bush described the network created by Abdul Qadeer Khan, a founder of Pakistan's nuclear program, more fully than any American official has in public. In doing so, the president broke years of official silence about a man who American intelligence agencies determined years ago was one of the world's most successful traffickers in nuclear technology.

"There is a consensus among nations that proliferation cannot be tolerated," Mr. Bush said in the half-hour speech, his most detailed yet about proliferation challenges. "Yet this consensus means little unless it is translated into action. Every civilized nation has a stake in preventing the spread of weapons of mass destruction."

But a crucial part of the seven-point plan led some critics to complain that Mr. Bush had not gone far enough. The president stopped well short of calling for an end to all trade in fissionable material � enriched uranium or reprocessed plutonium � saying his plan would only limit such shipments "to any state that does not already possess full-scale, functioning enrichment and reprocessing plants."

Those carefully chosen words would make Iran's current activities illegal, as well as North Korea's � provided the administration can persuade the country to dismantle its two nuclear weapons projects.

But his proposal leaves room for multibillion dollar fuel-reprocessing operations in many developed nations in Europe � and nonnuclear states like Japan � that supply nuclear power plants.

Several experts said they feared that the dual standard could undercut Mr. Bush's ability to sell his proposals among the members of the International Atomic Energy Agency, many of whom have long resented what they view as an effort by the five original nuclear weapons states � the United States, Russia, China, Britain and France � to extend their monopoly. Israel, Pakistan and India also have nuclear weapons capability, and North Korea is widely believed to possess several weapons.

Mr. Bush proposed a significant expansion of his Proliferation Security Initiative, a program to share intelligence among more than a dozen nations to intercept nuclear, biological and chemical weapons shipments � an operation that scored a major victory in October when it intercepted parts that Dr. Khan's network was sending to Libya. On Wednesday, the president said he wanted to "take direct action against proliferation networks," and he issued a warning akin to the one he has sent to terrorists.

"We will find the middlemen, the supplier and the buyers," he vowed, adding later, "We will find you and we're not going to rest until you are stopped."

Mr. Bush renewed a call for the United Nations Security Council to require all states to criminalize nuclear weapons proliferation � but he made no demand that Pakistan join the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty or allow international inspectors into the country. Pakistan's president, Pervez Musharraf, said last week as he pardoned Dr. Khan that he would never submit to international control over Pakistan's weapons program.

Mr. Bush, in one of his vaguer proposals, called for an expansion of legislation to retrain weapons scientists, saying the Nunn-Lugar program should be expanded from the former Soviet states to countries like Libya and Iraq.

Former Senator Sam Nunn, one of the legislation's authors, said on Wednesday evening that Mr. Bush "never mentioned resources" in his speech, noting that the government now spends $600 million to $800 million a year on the program, an amount he considers insufficient.

"The president said the terrorists are racing ahead" in their effort to obtain nuclear materials, Mr. Nunn said. "But we are walking."

Mr. Bush also said that starting next year he wanted to make sure no country shipped nuclear equipment to any nation that had not signed the "additional protocol" to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. That protocol gives expanded rights to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations' nuclear watchdog, to inspect a country's nuclear facilities.

Among those that have not yet adopted the protocol is the United States, and Mr. Bush called on the Senate to ratify it. It was a largely symbolic gesture because the United States is already a declared nuclear weapons state.

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E.  U.S. - Russia

1.
Moscow Is Dubious About US Global Missile Defense System
RIA Novosti
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, February 12, 2004. (RIA Novosti) - Russia is not certain that the creation of the global missile defense system by the USA is not aimed against Russia, Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov disclosed at his meeting with members of the State Duma Committee on International Affairs.

Ivanov stressed that Russia doesn't have the full image of what the USA do in this sphere, having stressed that the USA doesn't reject its plans, concerning the creation of the global missile defense system.

"We will be closely watching after all US steps in this sphere, so that they will be of no danger to our national interests. If such tendency is to emerge, we will take definite measures," Igor Ivanov stressed.

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2.
Russia Seeks World�s Unity To Counter New Threats - Ivanov
ITAR-TASS
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, February 12 (Itar-Tass) -- Efforts to strengthen the world community�s unity in resisting new challenges and threats will be one of Russia�s top foreign policy objectives this year.

Russia plans to implement a whole package of measures, geared to strengthening the regime of non-proliferation, preventing and settling regional conflicts and enhancing Russian-U.S. cooperation.

Equally important political tasks Russia will seek to cope with this year will be to promote integration processes in the CIS, advance strategic partnership with the European Union and NATO, exercise practical cooperation in peace-making and the struggle against terrorism and cooperation with countries in Latin America, the Arab world and the Asian region.

Ivanov was speaking in front of an audience of Russian legislators who discussed Russian foreign policy guidelines and cooperation by the Foreign Ministry and the State Duma.

Russia over the past few years gained a far stronger foothold in the international scene, Ivanov said. �This is a result of internal stabilization and the achievement of higher economic growth rates. A policy ensuring long-term vision of the national interests has been shaped. We can now safeguard our national interests through cooperation with other countries.�

Ivanov believes that many countries these days �see Russia as a major international partner.�

�Russia is greatly present in the search for solutions to the most acute regional and global problems, such as non-proliferation, Mideast problems and the settlement of nuclear disputes, including those involving North Korea and Iran.�

Ivanov criticized �interference in the internal affairs of sovereign countries on the excuse of struggle with terrorism.�

�Such a risk does exist. To forestall it we have been pressing for strengthening international law and the United Nations� role in the struggle with terrorism. As a result of continuous, systematic work we have been approaching a common understanding of what is terrorism. This issue is being discussed in the United Nations and we are hoping that a very clear definition of this term will be given soon.�

Relations between Russia and China have achieved the best level ever in history, Ivanov said. Russia�s multi-vector foreign policy is yielding tangible benefits.

�This is most graphically scene on the Asian track. Russia-China relations are at their best-ever level. Strategic partnership with India is growing stronger on the basis of a summit level declaration and other agreements. Cooperation with Japan is proceeding in the positive vein. It firmly relies on the bilateral action plan adopted last year.�

Russia will closely monitor the implementation of U.S. plans for deploying a global anti-ballistic missile defense system so as to prevent any harm to its interests, Ivanov said.

�The United States keeps financing this program. The implementation of these plans merely confirms Russia�s arguments were correct. A while ago we asked our U.S. partners to present evidence these plans pose no threat to Russia. We have no full picture to this day,� Ivanov said.

He described as useful the work being carried out on the basis of the Russia-U.S. strategic offensive reductions treaty and within the Russia-NATO Council.

�This work has a positive thrust, and we shall be closely following the implementation of plans for creating a strategic anti-ballistic missile defense to ensure our security be unharmed. If need be, we shall make a proportionate response.

Of late, there have been qualitative changes in Russian-U.S relations. They have become more stable and firmer.�

Ivanov noted the �successfully developing bilateral relations with Europe and constructive cooperation within the framework of Russia-NATO Council.�

At the same time Ivanov said that although the world has seen favorable changes over the past 10-15 years, it has not become a safer place to live in.

�The number of unsettled regional conflicts has been growing. Proliferation of arms and military technologies, including weapons of mass destruction, poses an ever-greater threat.�

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F.  Russia - Iran

1.
America Not To Elbow Russia Out Of Iran: Nuclear Power Minister
Alevtina Schepetina
RIA Novosti
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, FEBRUARY 12 (RIA Novosti correspondent Alevtina Schepitina) - Alexander Rumyantsev, Russia's Minister of Nuclear Power Industry, enthusiastically approves the US President on every point of his yesterday's address, where nuclear nonproliferation is concerned.

"I offer my support to Mr. Bush on every item," the minister said while commenting the President's emphatic warning against mass destruction weaponry falling into terrorist or rogue regime hands.

Mr. Rumyantsev described that as "an extremely serious statement, which demands discussion". "An international understanding must be worked out to prevent terrorist access to whatever fission materials," he emphasised.

When reporters asked the minister whether he thought President George W. Bush was referring to Russian-Iranian nuclear-oriented contacts, the reply was: "The United States is certainly criticising us, and does not think we ought to cooperate with Iran. As things really are, Russia has not trespassed any of its international pledges in its partnership with Iran, so we cannot agree to quit that market."

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2.
Iran, Russia Study Nuclear Cooperation
IRNA
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


Moscow, Feb 12, IRNA -- The Russian Federation Minister of Nuclear Energy Alexander Rumyantsev and Iran`s Ambassador to Moscow Gholamreza Shafei here Wednesday reviewed cooperation on peaceful use of nuclear energy.

At the meeting, the two sides stressed further expansion of nuclear cooperation particularly after signing up the additional protocol to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) by Iran. Return of spent nuclear fuel from Bushehr nuclear plant to Russia was one of the main topics of discussion between the two officials. The Russian minister also expressed hope that he could visit Iran soon.

Rumyantsev was scheduled to visit Iran on February 15 to inspect Bushehr nuclear plant as well as hold talks on nuclear cooperation with Iranian officials. However, his planned trip to Iran was postponed.

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3.
Russia's Nuclear Power Minister Puts Off Trip To Iran-For Technical Reasons, He Says
RIA Novosti
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, FEBRUARY 12, RIA NOVOSTI - Alexander Rumyantsev, Russia's Minister of Nuclear Power Industry, had scheduled a visit to Iran for February 15 into 18. The event has been postponed now-for technical reasons, the minister said in a Novosti interview.

There are no politics whatsoever behind the suspension. The Parties merely have not settled certain issues related to a bilateral treaty to be signed. It concerns restoration to Russia of spent nuclear fuel from the Bushehr nuclear power plant Russian experts are building on the Iranian coast of the Gulf. In particular, there are differences on pricing the fuel Iran will be purchasing, explained Mr. Rumyantsev.

The Parties made the visit schedule early last month. Russia hoped TVEL Co. and its partners would have signed all necessary papers by mid-February. Price disputes thwarted the signing, however.

Despite all that, the minister hopes the Parties will sign all papers within two weeks-that is, before the month's end. There will be no more obstacles to the visit then, he reassured.

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4.
Washington On Moscow's Decision
Alexander Bratarsky
RIA Novosti
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, FEBRUARY 12, 2004, /RIA-NOVOSTI CORRESPONDENT ALEXANDER BRATARSKY/ -- The US Administration is only partially satisfied with Moscow's decision to return spent nuclear fuel from the Bushehr nuclear power plant (NPP) now being constructed in Iran. This was stated here today by US Ambassador to Russia Alexander Vershbow.

This decision on Moscow's part means that Iran won't use spent nuclear fuel in its own uranium-enrichment program, Vershbow went on to say. He was speaking at the local International University.

Nonetheless, Washington has information to the effect that Iran keeps implementing its own uranium-enrichment program; consequently, this evokes some doubts concerning the Bushehr project on the part of the US Administration, Vershbow added.

We still have some doubts concerning the expediency of Russia's building the Bushehr NPP, Vershbow noted, while commenting on the forthcoming Iranian visit by Russian Nuclear Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev.

Rumyantsev postponed his Bushehr visit until late March because of the March 20 parliamentary elections in Iran.

Vershbow called on Russia to adopt a tougher stand on Iran.

A domestic struggle between reformists and hard-liners is obviously unfolding in Iran, Vershbow said, adding that hard-liners alone supported the Iranian nuclear program.

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G.  Russian Nuclear Forces

1.
Putin Insists On Necessity For Russia To Maintain Its Nuclear Weapons
RIA Novosti
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, February 12 (RIA Novosti) - Russia can and will maintain its nuclear power as an element of security on the planet, said Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Answering the questions of his authorized representatives, the Russian presidential candidate said nuclear deterrence forces' exercises will take place soon in Russia.

But we should not make other countries afraid of us, Putin said. However, he believes, Russia must support its nuclear power as an element of security on the planet. "We will maintain this power," Putin reassured.

As confirmation, he cited "the exercises of nuclear deterrence forces with other combat arms' participation, due to take place soon."

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2.
General Says Military Exercise Not Aimed at U.S.
Associated Press
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


A massive military exercise that will involve numerous launches of ballistic missiles and flights of strategic bombers is not aimed against the United States but reflects Moscow's concerns about U.S. plans to develop new types of nuclear weapons, a top general said Tuesday.

The exercise, which has been underway since late January at the headquarters level, will involve launches of an unspecified number of sea- and ground-based ballistic missiles and take strategic bombers to the air, said Colonel General Yury Baluyevsky, the first deputy chief of the General Staff.

Baluyevsky dismissed media reports that the planned exercise would closely resemble Soviet-era simulations of an all-out nuclear war with the United States, saying that it's not directed against any specific country.

"The enemy is imaginary," Baluyevsky said at a news conference. "There is no hint whatsoever that the enemy is the United States, or any other country. The United States holds a similar exercise each year and no one is making a fuss about it."

Baluyevsky said the exercise was prompted in part by Russia's concern about the development of low-yield nuclear weapons in the United States, which he described as destabilizing. "They are trying to make nuclear weapons an instrument of solving military tasks, lower the threshold of nuclear weapons use," he said. "Shouldn't we react to that, at least on the headquarters level? I'm sure that we should and we are doing that."

The maneuvers will also help develop weapons systems "capable of providing an asymmetric answer to existing and prospective weapons systems, including missile defense," Baluyevsky said.

Moscow informed the U.S. government in advance of the exercise, he said.

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3.
Russian Armed Forces Continuing Command And Staff Drill
ITAR-TASS
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, February 11 (Itar-Tass) - Russia's armed forces are continuing a strategic staff exercise. First Deputy Chief of the Russian General Staff Colonel-General Yuri Baluyevsky told a press conference in the Russian capital on Tuesday that the drill entered an active phase on February 10, while the preparatory phase began in the second part of January.

The purpose of the exercise is to provide practical training to the commanding structures of the strategic nuclear forces and to general-purpose units. A minimum number of forces are to be enlisted for the exercise, Baluyevsky said.

The Russian military command is planning to polish off during the exercise some elements of the concept of development of the Russian Armed Forces.

It will also check the capability of general-purpose forces to airlift troops and armaments to great distances with the subsequent fulfillment of combat exercise missions.

Chief of the Russian General Staff General Anatoly Kvashnin is personally directing the exercise and Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov is supervising it.

Besides general-purpose units, the drill involves all the component parts of the Russian nuclear triad and the space troops. The Russian strategic air force, including Tu-160 and Tu-95MS bombers, is to carry out flight missions during the exercise. They are to perform some combat exercise tasks with the launching of cruise missiles.

The strategic missile forces will carry out several launches of intercontinental ballistic missiles. A strategic submarine of the Russian Northern Fleet is to make an underwater launch of a ballistic missile.

On February 18, Russia will launch a �Molniya-M� booster rocket with a Cosmos-series military satellite on board.

The military command of the United States was notified about the upcoming exercise in conformity with the START-1 Treaty.

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4.
Russian Exercises Spurred by U.S. Nuclear Weapons Research, Russian General Says
Global Security Newswire
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


Gen. Yuri Baluyevsky, first deputy chief of the General Staff of the Russian military, said yesterday that a strategic military exercise that began yesterday reflected, in part, Russian concerns over U.S. plans to research new nuclear weapons (see GSN, Feb. 10).

The exercise is not directed against any specific country, including the United States, Baluyevsky said.

�The enemy is imaginary,� Baluyevsky said. �There is no hint whatsoever that the enemy is the United States, or any other country. The United States holds a similar exercise each year and no one is making a fuss about it,� he said.

Baluyevsky also said, though, the exercise was prompted, in part, by Russia�s concerns over U.S. plans to research low-yield nuclear weapons.

�They are trying to make nuclear weapons an instrument of solving military tasks, lower the threshold of nuclear weapons use,� Baluyevsky said. �Shouldn�t we react to that, at least on the headquarters level? I�m sure that we should and we are doing that,� he added (International Herald Tribune, Feb. 11).

Russia also plans to hold an exercise later this year to demonstrate to NATO that its nuclear arsenal is secure, Baluyevsky said yesterday.

�In April 2004 we will hold an exercise in the north to show the safety of stored nuclear arms,� he said. �We will invite our NATO colleagues to attend,� Baluyevsky added (Reuters/iWon.com, Feb. 10).

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5.
Russia to Stage Nuclear Arms Safety Show for NATO
Reuters
2/10/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW (Reuters) - A top Russian general said on Tuesday that Moscow planned to hold an exercise in April aimed at reassuring its NATO partners that its nuclear arsenals were in safe hands.

"In April 2004 we will hold an exercise in the North to show the safety of stored nuclear arms," first deputy chief of the General Staff Colonel-General Yuri Baluyevsky said.

"We will invite our NATO colleagues to attend," he told a news conference, but gave no further details about the exercise.

Russia has consistently denied Western suggestions that the instability of the early post-Soviet years had made its huge nuclear arsenals inherited from the Soviet Union easy prey for unstable states or terrorist networks.

An Arabic newspaper said last Sunday that some ex-Soviet tactical nuclear warheads, which Ukraine should have handed over to Russia after becoming a nuclear-free state, had got into the hands of the al Qaeda group blamed for the September 11, 2001, hijacked airliner attacks in the United States.

Baluyevsky echoed an earlier Ukrainian denial of the report.

"All weapons deployed in Ukraine were taken away to Russia. I am not aware of any event in which a single warhead went missing," he said.

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H.  Russian Nuclear Industry

1.
Russian Specialized Concern Accomplishes 25 International Nuclear Security Projects In 2003
RIA Novosti
2/13/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, February 13 (RIA Novosti) - The Russian specialized concern Rosenergoatom (the Russian state concern for generation of electric and thermal power at nuclear power plants) accomplished 25 international projects in the nuclear security sphere to the sum of 17 million dollars. All in all, the concern was involved in 152 projects as part of international nuclear security programs in 2003.

These programs imply supplies of equipment and technologies to Russia, the transfer of international experience and financing of Russian nuclear enterprises. The programs are carried out on the basis of intergovernmental agreements and are aimed at the increase of nuclear and radiation security at Russian power units.

Rosenergoatom as a recipient of technical assistance is involved in the following international programs: the TACIS program of the European Commission, the Swedish International Project, the US International Nuclear Security Program, the Nuclear Security Program of Great Britain, etc.

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2.
Rosenergoatom Plans To Build Floating Nuke Station In China
ITAR-TASS
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


NOVOVORONEZH, Voronezh region, February 12 (Itar-Tass) - Rosenergoatom concern has begun working on a project to create a floating nuclear station in China, said Anatoly Kirichenko, head of the department for Rosenergoatom�s international activity.

Kirichenko told Itar-Tass on Thursday this project �is ready. It is protected and licensed by the state supervision authority.� The infrastructure for the project is chosen, in particular the plants that will produce equipment. China will be the first country where a floating nuclear station will be built. �Corresponding agreements have been reached with Chinese structures � the government, financial organisations and a shipyard,� Kirichenko said.

The total capacity of two power units will reach 80 megawatt. The project is a breakthrough for Russian and world nuclear power engineering, Kirichenko stressed. �This is related not only to technologies but also to investments and cooperation of the two countries,� the official stressed.

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3.
Rosenergoatom, Electricite De France Implement 30 Big Projects
ITAR-TASS
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


NOVOVORONEZH, (Voronezh region), February 12 (Itar-Tass) -- The Russian atomic energy concern Rosenergoatom and the French energy company Electricite de France are implementing 30 big projects, chief of the Rosenergoatom international activity department Anatoly Kirichenko told Itar-Tass on Thursday.

According to him the cooperation of Russian and French specialists is characteristic of implementing �such European-scale projects that are important fro the point of view of working out the nuclear policy and its prospects.� In particular this is a joint project on improving the operation of reactors VVER-1000, which are the main in Russian atomic energy industry. Measures to increase security of the second reactor of the Kalinin nuclear power plant are taken as part of the project which cost is estimated at 30 million euros. �This project has already been put into practice, there are people that are engaged in it and working schedules are signed,� Kirichenko emphasised.

Electricite de France is the biggest world energy company producing electricity at nuclear power plants that has 59 reactors generating more than 400 billion kW/h, and therefore cooperation with it is �quite important for Russia,� the department chief remarked. The safe operation experience of Russian nuclear power plants is invaluable, he pointed out.

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4.
Ukraine, Russia To Extend Cooperation In Nuclear Power Industry
Interfax
2/9/2004
(for personal use only)


Ukraine and Russia are due to extend cooperation in the nuclear power industry in 2004. Ukraine's Energy Minister Serhiy Yermylov and Russian Nuclear Power Industry Minister Alexander Rumiantsev reached such an agreement in Moscow on February 5, reported the press service of the Ukrainian ministry Friday.

The minister agreed to draft a program this year on extension of cooperation between enterprises of the two countries in production of nuclear fuel.

The ministers adjusted volumes and conditions of nuclear fuel exports-imports and considered proposals on a number of other issues.

The parties signed a protocol on cooperation in peaceful use of nuclear power in 2004.

In addition, they decided to elaborate a program of long-term cooperation in exploitation, construction and decommissioning of nuclear reactors.

In this connection they proposed to continue work of an inter-governmental working groups on prolonging exploitation of nuclear reactors, and to continue bilateral consultations on completing construction of the third reactor of the Khmelnytsky NPP.

As reported earlier, the second reactor of the Khmelnytsky NPP is due to be commissioned this year. In October of 2003 President Leonid Kuchma ordered to continue construction of the third reactor of the Khmelnytsky NPP.

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I.  Nuclear Safety

1.
Containers Of Radioactive Cesium Discovered In Georgian City
ITAR-TASS
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


TBILISI, February 12 (Itar-Tass) -- Five containers filled with radioactive cesium-137, dangerous for human health, have been discovered at a gas filling station in the Georgian city of Kutaisi.

The station owners reported the incident to the Georgian State Security Ministry, asking to take away the containers that were used in industry more than 20 years ago.

The radiation at the station was about 1,000 milliroentgens a second, while the safe level is 10-20 milliroentgens.

The containers were transported away to a safe place.

An investigation into the incident has been launched.

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J.  Official Statements

1.
Article by Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov Published in the Newspaper Kommersant on February 13, 2004 under the Heading "Russia-USA: What Kind of Partnership?"
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
2/13/2004
(for personal use only)


Close contacts between the US Secretary of State Colin Powell and me have become a good tradition. Hardly a week or two pass without us discussing over the telephone various bilateral issues and international problems. These contacts do not only reflect the good personal relations that we have developed over the years of joint work, but are eloquent proof of the scale and new character of the relations existing between Russia and the US.

Another proof of this was the latest visit by Colin Powell to Moscow on January 26-27.

What made that trip different was that it took place against the background of the presidential election campaigns that had started in Russia and the US. So, naturally, people in our countries, when it comes to Russian-American relations, are asking what real achievements have been made in the past four years.

Opinions on that score vary widely. There are many who think that the relations between our countries have indeed attained a higher level characterized by greater mutual trust, pragmatism and predictability. But there is a rival point of view which, one must admit, has gained considerable currency in Moscow and Washington. It boils down to this, that present-day Russian-American relations are sustained by the personal sympathy between presidents Vladimir Putin and George Bush. But the partnership between the two countries is not being invested with real content and its base is not being strengthened. Hence the conclusion that these relations are shaky.

I hope that the results of Colin Powell's visit will help the skeptics to shed at least some of their doubts.

Of course, one cannot deny the special role of the presidents of Russia and the US in the development of bilateral relations. This has always been the case. Today, owing to many factors, the significance of that role increases many times over. It was the first meeting between Vladimir Putin and George Bush in Lubljana that set a new tone and gave the necessary impulse to progressive development of cooperation between our countries. In fact, that moment marked the start of painstaking work to build a relationship of a new type free of the Cold War cliches and oriented toward the 21st century. The work that has been pursued all these years and will continue in the coming period.

During the Camp David summit in September 2003 Vladimir Putin and George Bush made a comprehensive review of the state of bilateral relations and came to the common conclusion that they have reached the highest degree of maturity. The presidents issued concrete directives to build up cooperation over a wide spectrum.

These include issues of strategic stability, including the fight on terror, halting the transportation of WMD, cooperation in the military field, including anti-missile defense, etc.

It includes trade and economic relations, notably new investment projects, cooperation in the field of science and technology, high technology and agriculture.

It includes, finally, building up cooperation in the international arena.

As witnessed by the negotiations with Colin Powell, these directives of the presidents have been fulfilled or are in the process of being fulfilled. There hasn't been a rollback on any of the areas of cooperation.

Maturity and firmness of relations is usually tested when things get hard. Things got hard when the US unilaterally withdrew from the ABM Treaty. Things got hard when it launched the war in Iraq bypassing the UN Security Council. Nevertheless, our countries have managed through dialogue to prevent a return to confrontation and arms race, as happened more than once in the past. Common sense and the awareness that common strategic interests in fighting global threats and challenges outweigh any tactical differences gained the upper hand.

Does it mean that we won't have differences in the future? Of course not. Our countries are world powers with their histories and their own geopolitical and economic interests that cannot coincide everywhere and always. But the main thing is that we should also have mechanisms for resolving the contradictions that would allow us not to jeopardize Russian-American relations as a whole.

In the course of the Moscow talks Colin Powell in his typically polite manner expressed concern about some clouds which had appeared on the horizon of Russian-American relations and which, unless timely measures are taken, could mar their development, something the US administration would like to avoid. Among these "clouds" he mentioned some issues of Russian internal and external policy: the Yukos case, the past parliamentary elections in terms of compliance with democratic standards, the policy of Moscow with regard to Chechnya as well as with regard to its neighbors that were formerly part of the USSR (translation: Georgia).

We were appreciative to Colin Powell for such frankness because friends do not hide their grudges from each other. I think that Moscow provided frank and exhaustive answers to all the questions asked by the Secretary of State. Russia will under no circumstances be diverted from the path of market economy and democratic reform -- this was the main signal sent to Washington.

We hope that these clarifications, and most important, concrete deeds will help to dispel the clouds that the Untied States has spotted so that the sky over Russian-American relations should remain cloudless.

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2.
Global Security in the 21st Century: New Challenges, New Partnerships (excerpted)
Alexander Vershbow
Department of State
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


Today, I want to speak to you about global security in the 21st century, and in particular about the new and very different threats countries like the United States and Russia face in the post-Cold War era. I'd like to sketch briefly what I believe are some of the major challenges to global security today and explain what the United States is doing in cooperation with other countries to address such security challenges.

[�]

What are the problems that threaten global security and stability in the 21st century? Although they are many, I would like to briefly discuss five such threats: international terrorism; the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; the growing economic divide between developed countries and developing ones; failed governance, especially the failure of some states to guarantee the basic human rights and freedoms of their citizens; and the spread of virulent new diseases such as HIV/AIDS.

The attacks launched against the United States on September 11, 2001, convinced Americans that no nation was immune from the threat of international terrorism. Although terrorists have targeted Americans for several decades in various parts of the world, it literally hit home on that day. An outraged American public understandably wanted those responsible brought to justice, and future attacks on our homeland prevented. Thus, it is only natural that the war on terrorism has become the United States' number one foreign policy priority. But terrorism is not just America's problem; last week's tragic attack in Moscow again demonstrated that terrorism is, to quote President Putin, "the plague of the 21st century." The entire civilized world must unite against this plague, which knows no boundaries.

Muscovites know too well that terrorism threatens the most basic governmental function, which is to guarantee the physical integrity and safety of citizens. It often uses the intricate web of modern technology and communication that is a product of globalization to threaten the very civilization that made such advances possible. The threat of terrorism creates a common interest in cooperation among all countries that value peace, prosperity, and the rule of law. To quote Secretary Powell, "we must reassure people everywhere that the world has not just traded one kind of danger for another with the end of the Cold War. The victory of freedom will turn hollow if new fears replace old ones."

[�]

In his speech at the National Defense University in Washington yesterday, President Bush said: "The greatest threat before humanity today is the possibility of secret and sudden attack with chemical or biological or radiological or nuclear weapons." The thought that terrorists or their state sponsors could get access to weapons of mass destruction is indeed a terrifying one. That is why we view the spread of such weapons and related delivery technologies to be one of the most pressing threats to global security, a view that my government shares with yours. We have a unified stance against the two main challengers to the global nuclear nonproliferation regime, Iran and North Korea. We also hope that Russia will seriously consider joining the efforts of the United States and other leading European and Asian countries under President Bush's Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) to stem this threat by working together to intercept dangerous weapons and WMD technologies before they fall into the hands of states or terrorist organizations that mean us harm.

The United States and Russia already can look to some important achievements in our joint effort to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Thousands of former Soviet weapons scientists and technicians are making the difficult transition to civil, commercial and research applications of their skills, reducing the risk that a rogue scientist might sell his expertise to terrorists. Likewise, together we are working to secure nuclear material recovered from warheads demobilized under our arms control treaties. In these cases, by marrying American financial resources with Russian political will, we are helping to reduce the threat to the world at large.

Terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction represent two of the more immediate threats to global security, but there are many other, longer-term threats. Frankly, the growing economic, political and social divide between the developed and the developing world represents a long-term threat to global stability that we must address, not only out of a sense of moral responsibility, but also out of hard-nosed self-interest. The lack of economic security and human freedom across much of the globe creates fertile ground for religious fanaticism and political extremism, which in turn feeds terrorism

[�]

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3.
On Russian President Vladimir Putin's Message to US President George W. Bush
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin has sent a message to United States President George W. Bush expressing appreciation for the condolences and solidarity over the terrorist act that took place in Moscow, and noting that the sole response to the barbaric actions of terrorists should be a further building-up and deepening of the joint efforts in the struggle against this threat.

The message notes in part:

"Since our meeting at Camp David quite a lot has been done to advance cooperation between Russia and the United States in the areas outlined by us. I believe that the entirely pragmatic and systemic approach to organizing joint work, which we took as a basis at the summit, has fully acquitted itself. The 'Camp David checklist of tasks' has played an important mobilizing role: our agencies established close contacts, bilateral consultations intensified, and as a result things got moving.

"In each of the Checklist sections - security, scientific-technical and trade-and-economic cooperation, regional issues, ties between societies - concrete results are in evidence. Of course, the degree of progress in each case varies. Not all the assignments are fulfilled as of now.

"I think, however, that this should not be dramatized. The things being worked through, are fairly complex, and so they required our additional impulse and personal control. But the co-performers on both sides did the honest searching of a rapprochement of positions, realizing the full measure of their responsibility. I believe these endeavors deserve a positive appraisal. The most important thing is: in many respects we have succeeded, as we had in mind at Camp David, in cutting the distance between the political accords and their implementation. On the whole, this serves to strengthen the partnership between our countries.

"In our view, it is worthwhile making necessary specifications to the list and formulating new assignments in keeping with the reciprocal priorities. Then the list will be a 'living,' dynamic, forward-looking document."

Putin gave a high assessment to the outcome of the recent talks in Moscow with US Secretary of State Colin Powell and noted the effectiveness of the mechanism of consultations between senior officials from the administrations of the presidents of the two countries.

The message stresses further that a great deal has successfully been done since the first meeting with President Bush in Ljubljana to build qualitatively new relations.

"I am convinced that it is in our common interest to cherish the positive things that have been accumulated, and I think by practical actions we shall be able convincingly to show everyone that the partner foundations of our relations remain immutable and that any speculations about a 'cooling-off' between Russia and the United States are far removed from reality. Russia will remain a stable, reliable and predictable partner."

The message was handed over by Dmitry Medvedev, Head of the Russian Presidential Administration, who is staying on a working visit to the US.

The Kremlin, Moscow, February 11, 2004

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4.
Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Igor Ivanov Speaks to US Secretary of State Colin Powell by Telephone
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)


A telephone conversation took place on February 11 between Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Igor Ivanov and United States Secretary of State Colin Powell.

The heads of the foreign affairs agencies discussed a number of problems in bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the area of WMD nonproliferation. They also considered a number questions relating to the state of, and prospects for Middle East settlement.

February 11, 2004

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5.
Fact Sheet: Strengthening International Efforts Against WMD Proliferation (excerpted)
The White House
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

Expansion of G-8 Global Partnership

To ensure the nations of the world are doing all they can to secure and eliminate WMD and dangerous materials, the President proposes the expansion -- in funds, donors, and recipients -- of the G-8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction.

The Partnership originally provided $20 billion in nonproliferation assistance to the former Soviet Union, it should now also work to reduce and secure dangerous materials elsewhere in the world.

[�]

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6.
Hoyer: President's Non-Proliferation Effort Requires More Than Rhetoric - The President's Budget Would Under-Fund Proven, Effective Non-proliferation Programs
Steny H. Hoyer
Office of the Democratic Whip
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON, Feb. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer (D-MD) released the following statement this afternoon in response to President Bush's speech at the National Defense University on preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction:

"I have no doubt that President Bush wants to stop the spread of weapons of mass destruction. However, the truth is, there is a glaring gap between his statements today and the paltry funding for non-proliferation efforts that he has called for in his budget for next year.

"It's more than ironic that just last week, the President proposed cutting -- yes, cutting -- the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program by more than 9 percent, or almost $42 million. That program, named for Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN) and former Senator Sam Nunn (D-GA), has been tremendously successful in rounding up and securing nuclear weapons and fissile material in the former Soviet Union. In addition, the President's budget calls for a paltry 1.1 percent increase in funding for the Department of Energy's nuclear non- proliferation programs.

"It is simply inexplicable that the President has failed to match his rhetoric with funding requests for non-proliferation programs that are demanded by the threats we face in the world today. Experts both here and abroad recognize the greatest threat our nation faces today is the prospect of weapons of mass destruction falling into the hands of rogue nations or terrorist organizations. The question is not whether we can afford to fund vital non-proliferation programs, it's whether we can afford not to. The rogue nations of the world and international terrorist organizations are not going to be persuaded by tough talk alone."

CONTACT: Stacey Farnen of the Office of the Democratic Whip, +1-202-225-3130.

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7.
Lugar welcomes President�s support of Nunn-Lugar expansion; Praises nonproliferation initiative (excerpted)
Richard G. Lugar, Senator
Office of Sen. Richard Lugar
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

Today, President Bush announced his continued strong support for the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program in a speech at the National Defense University (speech scheduled for 2:30 pm today at Fort McNair, Washington, DC). In addition to expanding the Nunn-Lugar program, the President announced important steps to improve U.S. efforts to stop the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

�I welcome President Bush�s support for the expansion of Nunn-Lugar and praise the President�s new nonproliferation program. Keeping nuclear, biological and chemical weapons out of the hands of terrorists and rogue states is the world�s most dangerous and challenging security threat,� said U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Dick Lugar and co-creator of the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction program.

�Implementing the steps outlined today by President Bush will make great progress toward a safer world. I will work closely with the President in strengthening existing nonproliferation regimes such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group and the International Atomic Energy Agency.�

The President called for the expansion of the G-8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction. Senator Lugar praised the President�s efforts to expand the funds, participants and recipients of the �10 + 10 Over 10� program. President Bush�s hope to take the G-8 initiative outside the former Soviet Union, closely parallels legislation Senator Lugar sponsored, and which was passed by Congress last year, authorizing up to $50 million in Nunn-Lugar funds to be spent for proliferation emergencies outside the former Soviet Union.

The G-8 has already contributed to the Nunn-Lugar program, including the building of a chemical weapons destruction facility at Shchuchye, Russia and expanding the disarming of the Russian submarine fleet.

[�]

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8.
Opening Statement for Hearing with Secretary Powell (excerpted)
Richard G. Lugar, Senator
Office of Sen. Richard Lugar
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

In Russia, the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program and its associated programs continue to safeguard and destroy the arsenal of weapons of mass destruction built by the former Soviet Union. Through the G-8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction, we have secured $10 billion in commitments for this endeavor from our allies. Congress passed legislation that allows the Nunn-Lugar program to be used outside the states of the former Soviet Union, and with President Bush�s strong encouragement, chemical weapons destruction at Shchuchye in Russia has been accelerated. We must ensure that the funding and momentum of the Nunn-Lugar program is not encumbered by bureaucratic obstacles or undercut by political disagreements.

The United States also has moved forward in the area of arms control negotiations. Last year, at the request of the President, the Senate ratified the Moscow Treaty governing the strategic nuclear arsenals of Russia and the United States. In coming weeks, the Foreign Relations Committee intends to report the resolution of ratification of the IAEA Additional Protocol to the Senate. This Protocol will strengthen the international community�s ability to detect illegal weapons programs. Yesterday, President Bush called for immediate ratification of the Additional Protocol.

[�]

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9.
Remarks by the President on Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation (excerpted)
The White House
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

Third, I propose to expand our efforts to keep weapons from the Cold War and other dangerous materials out of the wrong hands. In 1991, Congress passed the Nunn-Lugar legislation. Senator Lugar had a clear vision, along with Senator Nunn, about what to do with the old Soviet Union. Under this program, we're helping former Soviet states find productive employment for former weapons scientists. We're dismantling, destroying and securing weapons and materials left over from the Soviet WMD arsenal. We have more work to do there.

And as a result of the G-8 Summit in 2002, we agreed to provide $20 billion over 10 years -- half of it from the United States -- to support such programs. We should expand this cooperation elsewhere in the world. We will retain [sic] WMD scientists and technicians in countries like Iraq and Libya. We will help nations end the use of weapons-grade uranium in research reactors. I urge more nations to contribute to these efforts. The nations of the world must do all we can to secure and eliminate nuclear and chemical and biological and radiological materials.

[�]

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10.
Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Igor Ivanov Speaks to Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs Kamal Kharrazi by Telephone
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)


A telephone conversation took place between Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Igor Ivanov and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Islamic Republic of Iran Kamal Kharrazi.

The ministers discussed problems in postwar settlement in Iraq, accentuating attention to the need for the United Nations' central role in this process. The sides also exchanged views regarding the situation around the Iranian nuclear program in the light of the upcoming session in March of the IAEA Board of Governors and touched upon topical issues in bilateral relations.

The conversation bore a business character and passed in the constructive and benevolent spirit intrinsic to the Russian-Iranian political dialogue.

February 10, 2004

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11.
Ukrainian Foreign Ministry States That Al-Hayat Newspaper's Information about Ukraine's Turning Nuclear Ammunition over to Al-Qaida Terrorists is Absolutely Groundless
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine
2/10/2004
(for personal use only)


As the Ukrainian Foreign Ministry stated on Monday, articles in Ukrainian and foreign mass communication media, with reference to the Al-Hayat newspaper, about Ukrainian scientists' turning nuclear ammunition over to Al-Qaida terrorists in 1998 are absolutely groundless. On Sunday, the pan-Arab al-Hayat newspaper quoted sources close to al Qaeda as saying the group bought the weapons in suitcases in a deal arranged when Ukrainian scientists visited the Afghan city of Kandahar in 1998.

Ukraine had no nuclear weapons in 1998 because the ex-Soviet republic had transferred all of them to Russia by June 1, 1996. All transfers were verified three times by Ukrainian and Russian officials. Ukraine had observed all agreements on giving up its share of the Soviet nuclear arsenal inherited after the 1991 break-up of the Soviet Union. Tactical weapons had been sent to Russia for destruction in 1992 and warheads from strategic missiles by 1996 -- in line with an accord signed with Moscow and Washington in 1994.

In 1993, Ukraine signed a pact with the United States and Russia volunteering to lay down its arsenal of some 1,900 nuclear missiles inherited from the Soviet Union. Ukraine conscientiously adheres to its obligations under the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty. Ukraine and USA cooperate on the constant basis holding joint working group sessions on non-proliferation and export control. The last one took place in January 2004. The Ukrainian Foreign Affairs Ministry is not ruling out the possibility of suing the pan-Arab Al-Hayat newspaper for publishing an article aimed at undermining Ukraine's image. According to Mr. Lubkivskyi, Ukraine "reserves the right to act in accordance with the situation" because a blow has been dealt to its international image.

He stressed that the newspaper's allegations has been rejected not only by officials at the Ukrainian Foreign Affairs Ministry, but also by a broad spectrum of the Ukrainian public, political scientists, and scientists. "It was misinformation, and the possibility of similar things happening in the future cannot be ruled out," Mr. Lubkivskyi said. According to him, detractors are attempting in this manner to weaken Ukraine's position not only in Iraq, but also on the international arena. Therefore, according to him, the Ukrainian Foreign Affairs Ministry will take all possible protective measures to "neutralize appearance of similar publications" in the future.

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12.
USA Suggests Compromise and Alternative Mode to Get Rid of Solid Propellents - George Bush's Letter
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine
2/9/2004
(for personal use only)


On Monday, February 9 a letter from US President George Bush reached President Kuchma's office, in which George Bush reaffirmed his Administration's unqualified support for the Program of generally diminishing threats in Ukraine and expressed his hope that, in addition to implementing new projects in this domain, the USA and Ukraine will succeed incarrying out the final task in getting rid of strategic arms on Ukraine's soil, that is, disposal of SS-24 ICBMs' solid propellents. However, in the US President's opinion, the mode of destruction of solid propellents, which the Pavlograd Chemical Works in Dnipropetrovsk region has practised and which was supported by both nations' governments, fails to met due safety standards, despite sizeable expenditures.

Which is why, the US President's message says, Ukrainian and American experts should find an "alternative method" to complete this important project. President George Bush's letter to President Leonid Kuchma was a response to Kuchma's letter to President Bush in late 2003, in which the Ukrainian Head of State raised the issue of the US party resuming financing of this environmentally harmless project to dispose of solid propellents.

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13.
Ukraine-US Consultations On Non-Proliferation And Export Control Issues To Be Held Twice A Year
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)


On January 26-27, 2004 the Washington session of Ukrainian-American working group on non-proliferation and export control was held.

The parties have discussed:

# measures on the further co-operation in the field of export control system;

# issues of co-operation with the United States in the field of solid propellant recycling for SS-24 rockets;

# regional context of military-technical co-operation and export control;

# issue of rendering assistance to Ukraine for the improvement of export control system and borders' security;

# destruction of excessive stocks of light weapon and ammunition;

# possibility for Ukraine to be granted the status of a recipient of

assistance within the framework of the Global partnership on prevention of proliferation of the weapon of mass destruction and related materials program, initiated by G-8.

The arrangement has been achieved to conduct consultations on these issues twice a year.

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K.  Links of Interest

1.
Saving Ourselves From Self-Destruction
Mohamed ElBaradei
New York Times
2/12/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.iaea.or.at/NewsCenter/Statements/2004/ebNYT20040212.html


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2.
MOX Plan Delayed By Bush Administration Budget Documents
Charles Digges
Bellona Foundation
2/11/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.bellona.no/en/international/russia/nuke_industry/co-operation/325..


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3.
Upcoming EU Enlargement Revives Long-Standing Nuclear Battle
Soizick Martin; Charles Digges
Bellona Foundation
2/10/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.bellona.no/en/international/russia/nuke_industry/co-operation/324..


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