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Nuclear News - 1/30/2004
RANSAC Nuclear News, January 30, 2004
Compiled By: Matthew Bouldin


A.  Threat Reduction Expansion
    1. United States Should Help Secure South Asian Nuclear Materials, Experts Say, Mike Nartker, Global Security Newswire (1/29/2004)
B.  Bioweapons
    1. Biological Terror. Real Not Imaginable Threat, RIA Novosti (1/28/2004)
C.  G-8 Global Partnerships
    1. Norway To Help Rehabilitate Radioactive Waste Sea Burial , Yekaterina Kozlova, RIA Novosti, RIA Novosti (1/28/2004)
D.  Strategic Arms Reduction
    1. Russia And USA Set Up Commission For Implementing Moscow Treaty , RosBusinessConsulting (1/30/2004)
    2. Russian-US Commission For START Implementation To Begin Functioning Soon, RIA Novosti (1/30/2004)
E.  U.S. - Russia
    1. Moscow, Washington See Eye To Eye On North Korea Issue, RIA Novosti (1/30/2004)
    2. Russia, US Discuss Cooperation In Nuclear Field, ITAR-TASS (1/30/2004)
    3. Russian Atomic Energy Minister, US Undersecretary Of State Discuss Nuclear Non-Proliferation In Moscow, RIA Novosti (1/30/2004)
    4. Russian Foreign Ministry: Talks With Bolton "Serious, Concrete, Pragmatic", RIA Novosti (1/30/2004)
    5. Russian And US Deputy Foreign Ministers Hold Consultations On Disarmament Issues In Moscow, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    6. Russian-American Non-Proliferation Consultations Open In Moscow, ITAR-TASS (1/29/2004)
    7. Experts Warn of Accidental U.S., Russian Missile Launches, David Ruppe, Global Security Newswire (1/28/2004)
F.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy
    1. Head Of Russian Atomic Energy Ministry Is For Preserving IAEA, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    2. Russia Views IAEA As Main Tool Of Non-Proliferation Control, ITAR-TASS (1/29/2004)
G.  Russia - Iran
    1. Russia Foreign Ministry Declares Bringing Closer of Russian and U.S. Positions On Iran's Nuclear Program, RIA Novosti (1/30/2004)
    2. Russia-Iran Nuclear Ties Fully Legal: Minister, AFP (1/30/2004)
    3. Rumyantsev To Discuss With Bolton Iranian Issue, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    4. Russia To Take Decision On Building Of 2nd Power Unit Of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant Soon, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
H.  Russia - China
    1. Russian Atomic Ministry To Take Part In All Tenders Announced By China For Construction Of A Nuclear Power Station, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
I.  Russian Nuclear Forces
    1. Russian Atomic Energy Minister: Russia's Nuclear Arsenal Is In Complete Order, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    2. Russian, French Subs To Conduct Joint Maneuvers, Interfax (1/29/2004)
J.  Nuclear Fuel Return
    1. Zheleznogorsk Combine Expects 13 Spent Nuclear Fuel Trains In 2004 , Bellona Foundation (1/29/2004)
K.  Russian Nuclear Industry
    1. No Shutdown For Armenian Nuke Plant: Russia's Vice-Premier, Hamlet Matevosyan, RIA Novosti (1/30/2004)
    2. Atomic Energy Minister Accuses Rivals Of Attempts To Compromise Russia At International Nuclear Market, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    3. Atomic Energy Ministry To Launch Corporatization In The Sector In 2007-2008, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    4. Lunar Helium-3 Production For Thermonuclear Plants To Become An Opportunity In Only 30 Years � Rumyantsev, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
    5. Russia Steps Up Nuclear Exports , RosBusinessConsulting (1/29/2004)
    6. Russian Atomic Energy Ministry To Decide On Building Of Floating Nuclear Power Plant In 2004, RIA Novosti (1/29/2004)
L.  Nuclear Safety
    1. EU To Provide Safety Equipment To Russian Nuclear Power Plant, ITAR-TASS (1/30/2004)
M.  Official Statements
    1. Biotechnology Cluster at Former Weapons Plant Needs $120 Million in Investment, Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan News Bulletin (1/30/2004)
    2. Press Release, Press Service of the Security Council of the Russian Federation (1/30/2004)
    3. Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Kislyak Meets with US Under Secretary of State John Bolton, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin (1/30/2004)
    4. Lugar Announces Collaborative Grant to Purdue University And Russian Scientists to Develop Chemical Warfare Agent Detection System, Office of Sen. Richard Lugar (1/29/2004)
    5. Daily Press Briefing (excerpted), Department of State (1/28/2004)
    6. Swiss Support For Chemical Disarmament In The Russian Federation, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland (1/28/2004)
N.  Links of Interest
    1. Domestic WMD Incident Management - Legal Desk Book, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (1/29/2004)
    2. Six Steps to a Safer America - National Security and the 2005 Budget: An Overview, Lawrence J. Korb, Center for American Progress (1/29/2004)
    3. The Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreement Between the United States of America and the IAEA, Linton Brooks, National Nuclear Security Administration (1/29/2004)
    4. Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy, Sen. Biden, Paul C. Warnke Conference on the Past, Present & Future of Arms Control (1/28/2004)
    5. Pakistan & India: Steps Toward Rapprochement, Michael Krepon, Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1/28/2004)
    6. Wanted: A New U.S. Policy on Russia, Sarah E. Mendelson, PONARS Memo (1/28/2004)
    7. Bellona's Kharitonov to Speak in Finnish Parliament, Rashid Alimov and Charles Digges, Bellona Foundation (1/26/2004)



A.  Threat Reduction Expansion

1.
United States Should Help Secure South Asian Nuclear Materials, Experts Say
Mike Nartker
Global Security Newswire
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON � The United States should launch an effort to help India and Pakistan prevent terrorists from stealing nuclear weapon or �dirty bomb� materials, experts told U.S. lawmakers yesterday (see GSN, Sept. 29, 2003).

The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee heard testimony yesterday from three U.S. experts on ways the United States could work to advance nuclear nonproliferation goals in South Asia and to aid the two countries in improving relations. According to Michael Krepon of the Henry L. Stimson Center, one way the United States can advance nuclear risk reduction in the region is by helping both India and Pakistan to secure both nuclear weapons materials and nonfissionable radioactive materials used for civilian purposes, such as in some medical devices.

�I think we can work together with India and Pakistan, because we all have this common problem of nuclear terrorism,� Krepon said.

He also said that such an effort could lead to expanded collaborative efforts to reduce nuclear dangers in South Asia.

�It�s the easiest way in,� Krepon said, noting the increasing concern in both India and Pakistan over the threat of terrorists developing radiological weapons. �I think this is the door that�s most ajar,� he added.

While agreeing that working to reduce nuclear terrorism in South Asia was important, Stephen Cohen of the Brookings Institution disagreed that the United States was the most appropriate country to provide such assistance.

�It will be seen as the camel�s nose in the tent by them into their nuclear establishment,� Cohen said.

During questioning, committee Chairman Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) expressed support for the idea (see GSN, Dec. 9, 2002). The senator was an architect of Cooperative Threat Reduction program, the U.S. effort to secure and dismantle weapons of mass destruction and related materials in the Soviet Union.

Lugar noted that Pakistan might be hesitant to support any such effort because of concerns that it would be a cover for U.S. intelligence.

�But leaving aside how they feel about it, over the course of time we might be able to demonstrate that there is real value in United States cooperation in helping to secure materials, both the weapons types and � in the laboratories and elsewhere, as we are finding in our own homeland security,� he said.

Dialogue

In his testimony, Krepon stressed the need for India and Pakistan to resolve their dispute over the Kashmir region, a frequent flashpoint between the two countries, to advance nuclear risk reduction in the region. To aid the process, the United States can offer increased financial assistance to both countries to improve the humanitarian situation in their sections of Kashmir and can offer to aid India and Pakistan in monitoring any agreements they might reach regarding the withdrawal of conventional forces along the Line of Control dividing the region, Krepon said.

�If they asked us, we ought to be prepared to help,� he said.

Next month, India and Pakistan are scheduled to hold three days of talks in Islamabad as part of a planned peace dialogue agreed to earlier this month by Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee and Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf. Both sides have expressed hope that the dialogue will lead to a resolution of the Kashmir dispute (see GSN, Jan. 27).

During yesterday�s hearing, though, experts offered differing assessments of the dialogue�s likely success. Former U.S. Ambassador to India Frank Wisner expressed confidence in the dialogue�s chances to improve relations between India and Pakistan, noting the political strength of both Vajpayee and Musharraf in their respective countries and the two leaders� increased commitment to and involvement in resolving their countries� lingering disputes.

Cohen, however, said he was �pessimistic� that the dialogue would be a success unless senior Indian and Pakistani officials maintained pressure on diplomats to complete the effort within a set timeframe (see GSN, Jan. 21). Otherwise, �the natural tendency for government officials in both countries is to do nothing,� he said.

In addition, the dialogue must also include a �reciprocal process of concession� by both India and Pakistan to avoid repeating the failures of past efforts, Cohen told the committee.

�So far, the history has been that one side has given something, the other side has not responded, and that�s the end,� he said. �If I were in public office, I wouldn�t bet my job on this reaching a successful conclusion,� Cohen added.

Wisner said the United States could aid the Indian-Pakistani dialogue by working behind the scenes to ensure that core issues are addressed and that the leadership of both countries remains engaged in the process (see GSN, Jan. 13).

�I know from first-hand discussions with leaders in New Delhi that this kind of quiet, purposeful American nudging is appreciated,� he said.

Wisner also called for an internal reorganization to consolidate and better coordinate U.S. foreign policy approaches to South Asia. He stopped short, though, of calling for the appointment of a U.S. special envoy to the region.

The United States should also work with its allies to use various aid packages to reward India, Pakistan and Kashmiri groups for progress made in negotiations, Cohen said. He also said that the United States should not take a position on the final shape of any Kashmir settlement, and should instead cast the whole issue as one of human rights.

�Pakistanis can claim in the end that their struggle resulted in a more humane treatment of the Kashmiri people, even if Kashmir is not joined to Pakistan. Indians will remove a blot on their democracy. And the Kashmiris, of course, will recover a semblance of normal life,� Cohen said.

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B.  Bioweapons

1.
Biological Terror. Real Not Imaginable Threat
RIA Novosti
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, JANUARY 28. /RIA NOVOSTI / -- Russia's chief state sanitary physician Gennadi Onischenko warns of a real threat of biological terrorism and is sceptical about medical successes gained in combating infectious diseases.

"We have reached only a modest success in combating infections. Actually, we have won only one infectious agent, smallpox virus", Onischenko said. Main is becoming more and more vulnerable, dependent on pathogenic /infectious/ microorganisms--carrying agents of infectious diseases. The problem of opposing the biological danger is gaining in topicality, he said.

"We must realise the global character of the biological danger in order to secure the vital activities of man, bar him from the negative effects of the biotic factors", said the Russian chief sanitary physician in the interview carried by the Thursday issue of the Russian Gazette.

To Onischenko, the largest biological threat to man, society in general, is borne by the natural reserves of microorganisms and the unchecked release or spread of living organisms, especially genetically modified, having unknown mechanisms of impact on the surrounding world. As dangerous are the massive outbreaks of infectious diseases of natural origin, accidents and acts of subversion at facilities where pathogenic microorganisms are under study, use of microorganisms for military and terrorist ends, including acts of subversion at biologically hazardous facilities.

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C.  G-8 Global Partnerships

1.
Norway To Help Rehabilitate Radioactive Waste Sea Burial
Yekaterina Kozlova, RIA Novosti
RIA Novosti
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)


MURMANSK, January 28, 2003. /RIA Novosti correspondent Yekaterina Kozlova/ -- Norway will allocate over 6 million kroner (approximately $900,000) to rehabilitate a radioactive waste burial in the Andreev bay in the Barents waters adjacent to Russia. Bilateral agreement has recently been inked in Kirkenes, Norway.

As reported by the administration of the Murmansk region, the first contract intends the holding of a comprehensive geological survey in the Andreev bay. So far, only trustworthy information is obtaining on the condition of radioactive waste on the surface of the burial and not more than 30 centimeters below the surface.

For an in-depth study a thorough geological survey has to be held.

Geological survey is also needed to create, on a longer perspective, an infrastructure in the Andreev bay. Such study will help to say where infrastructure facilities can be built, the administration said.

The second contract intends the formation of conditions for work of the personnel inside the sea storage of radioactive waste.

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D.  Strategic Arms Reduction

1.
Russia And USA Set Up Commission For Implementing Moscow Treaty
RosBusinessConsulting
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


RBC, 30.01.2004, Moscow 15:34:12.The bilateral commission on cooperation in implementing the Strategic Offensive Reduction Treaty (the so-called Moscow Treaty) will start functioning in the near future, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Kislyak told journalists today after his talks with US Under Secretary of State John Bolton. Kislyak pointed out that the treaty ratified by the Russian State Duma and the US Congress had already taken effect. It envisages taking a number of serious steps by both Russia and the USA, and setting up a Russian-US commission for ensuring the implementation of the treaty in particular.

Kislyak emphasized, however, that the establishment of the commission had been protracted as the sides had had different approaches to the commission's mandate and purview. At present, all contentious issues have been settled, and the commission will soon start operating, the official noted.

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2.
Russian-US Commission For START Implementation To Begin Functioning Soon
RIA Novosti
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 30 (RIA Novosti) - The Russian-American commission to oversee the implementation of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty will start functioning some time soon, a Russian Foreign Ministry source told RIA Novosti on Friday.

The opening of the commission was not delayed intentionally, insisted the source.

"We have worked out an approach to the mandate of this group. We have agreed that the commission should have a clearly worded mandate to promote the implementation of the treaty.

"The commission will start working one or two months behind schedule," said the source.
This may happen some time soon. "We will complete the process rather soon as we have agreed all major issues with our American colleagues," he said.

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E.  U.S. - Russia

1.
Moscow, Washington See Eye To Eye On North Korea Issue
RIA Novosti
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, JANUARY 30 (RIA Novosti) - Russia and the United States see eye to eye on the North Korea issue, a source at the Russian Foreign Ministry told the RIA news agency Friday.

According to the source, North Korea's nuclear weapons program was high on the agenda of Russian officials' latest talks in Moscow with John Bolton, US Undersecretary of State.

"The main thing that unites us today is the awareness of the fact that the problem needs a diplomatic solution and that there is nothing better than the existing format of six-party talks," with the participants being the two Koreas, the US, Russia, China, and Japan, our interviewee pointed out.

Also, both sides realize that there need to be prerequisites for North Korea to make a decision that would enable it to get back into the framework of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, with all ensuing implications in terms of the control over and the elimination of the potential for producing weapons of mass destruction.

"The settlement should bring us back to the concept of the nuclear-free Korean peninsula, with North Korea to be given guarantees of its security," the source pointed out. At the most recent consultations with Bolton, however, no specific date was given for a second round of North Korean talks, he added. The next round should be held not in the one-vs-five format, but with each of the six parties concerned to play its own particular role, said the Foreign Ministry official. Russia, China, Japan and South Korea are all interested in having the Korean Peninsula as a stable and predictable region. The United States wants North Korea to get rid of its nuclear potential and to rejoin the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. And North Korea seeks to get security guarantees for itself and conditions for its national development, he said.

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2.
Russia, US Discuss Cooperation In Nuclear Field
ITAR-TASS
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 30 (Itar-Tass) - - Russian Atomic Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev and U.S. Under-Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security John R. Bolton have considered issues of Russian-US cooperation in the nuclear field here.

As Itar-Tass learnt at the press service of the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry, during the meeting, the sides �discussed current issues of Russian-American cooperation in the nuclear field,� as well as problems related to non-proliferation of nuclear materials and technologies.

According to the press service, the sides also considered �topical problems of radiation and nuclear security in the world.�

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3.
Russian Atomic Energy Minister, US Undersecretary Of State Discuss Nuclear Non-Proliferation In Moscow
RIA Novosti
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 30, 2004. /RIA Novosti/. Russian Atomic Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev and US Undersecretary of State John Bolton discussed non-proliferation of nuclear materials and technologies and radiation and nuclear security in Moscow on Friday, said the press service of the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry.

In addition, they discussed current issues of Russian-US cooperation in nuclear sphere.

The meeting was held as part of regular consultations, the press service reported.

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4.
Russian Foreign Ministry: Talks With Bolton "Serious, Concrete, Pragmatic"
RIA Novosti
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, JANUARY 30 (RIA Novosti) - The Russian Foreign Ministry assesses the latest talks in Moscow with US Undersecretary of State John Bolton as "serious, concrete and very pragmatic," Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Kislyak told reporters after speaking with the American diplomat Friday.

According to Kislyak, the sides shared their views on issues relating to the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. "WMD black markets are becoming increasingly evident today, which poses a serious threat to the interests of our security," he pointed out.

In his words, the problem is all the more dangerous given the threat of global terrorism. "Any state in such a situation is interested in creating mechanisms to fight this phenomenon," he said.

The enhancement of the International Atomic Energy Agency's activity on the global arena and the compliance with the Chemical Weapons Convention and several other treaties related to the non-proliferation regime were also high on the agenda, Kislyak said.

Regional problems figured prominently, too, the deputy foreign minister reported. These included Libya's decision to suspend its weapons programs, to be examined at the IAEA board's March session; progress in the implementation of the IAEA resolution on Iraq, and North Korea's nuclear weapons ambitions.

According to Kislyak, due attention was also paid to the implementation of the US-Russian Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty and to the sides' collaborative efforts toward disarmament.

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5.
Russian And US Deputy Foreign Ministers Hold Consultations On Disarmament Issues In Moscow
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, JANUARY 29, 2004. (RIA NOVOSTI). Negotiations are being held at the Russian Foreign Ministry between Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Kislyak and US Undersecretary of State John Bolton on the issues of disarmament and non-proliferation of mass destruction weapons.

A source at the Russian foreign ministry told RIA Novosti that Moscow and Washington have large possibilities for joint work in this sphere.

In particular, the sides will discuss the implementation of the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty (SOR). The agency's interlocutor reported that the Treaty had come into force at the meeting of the two countries' presidents in St. Petersburg on June 1, 2003.

The implementation of the Treaty should now begin, with the plans of reductions coordinated, and a bilateral commission should harmonize the spheres of its terms of reference and a mandate, the source stressed.

The participants in the consultations should take into account the negotiations between the US Secretary of State Colin Powell and the Russian leaders which ended yesterday, the foreign ministry pointed out.

The sides are also expected to discuss Moscow-Washington cooperation in anti-missile defence. Russia declared more than once its readiness to cooperate with the United States in nonategic anti-missile defence projects.

The Russian and US deputy foreign ministers will also discuss regional problems, in particular the situation around Iran. The source pointed out that a tangible rapprochement between the Russian and US stances in this sphere has been observed of late.

"The Iranians themselves contributed to this in many respects when they agreed to the IAEA inspections and signed an additional protocol on guarantees," the interlocutor said. He believes such steps on the part of Iran and the removal of concern around the Iranian nuclear programme will allow Russia to more actively cooperate with Teheran in the nuclear sphere, including in building the atomic power plant in Bushehr.

The situation around the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is also expected to be discussed at the meeting. In particular, Russia and the United States stressed more than once their interest in the earliest possible holding of the second round of the six-sided negotiations on North Korea.

RIA Novosti was told at the US embassy in Russia that during his Moscow visit Bolton will also meet with Russian defence minister and visit the atomic energy ministry.

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6.
Russian-American Non-Proliferation Consultations Open In Moscow
ITAR-TASS
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29 (Itar-Tass) - Russian-American non-proliferation consultations opened in Moscow on Thursday.

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Kislyak and U.S. Undersecretary of State John Bolton are discussing the �implementation of the accords that were reached at the meeting of the Russian and American presidents, Vladimir Putin and George Bush, in Camp David on the development of interaction in the sphere of non-proliferation and disarmament,� an informed source in Moscow told Itar-Tass.

�The American side would want to discuss regional aspects of non-proliferation, the struggle against illegal shipment of arms and their components, as well as the implementation of the Global Partnership initiative,� the source said.

�The Russian side, for its part, has interest in exchanging opinions regarding the realization of the Moscow Treaty on strategic offensive reductions and general tasks of ensuring the non-proliferation regime.�

�The Moscow meetings are an extension of the working dialogue, now at a political level. Apart from the consultations in the Foreign Ministry, John Bolton is going to visit several Russian agencies that are engaged in these matters,� the source said.

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7.
Experts Warn of Accidental U.S., Russian Missile Launches
David Ruppe
Global Security Newswire
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON � The United States and Russia unnecessarily continue to maintain thousands of strategic nuclear missiles on high alert for mutual deterrence, heightening the possibility of a catastrophic, unintended launch, an expert said this week at a nuclear arms control conference here.

�All of the thousands of U.S. and Russian launch-ready weapons only represent an accident waiting to happen and a temptation to terrorists to gain control over them,� said Center for Defense Information President Bruce Blair, speaking Sunday at a conference sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Research Institute (see GSN, Jan. 26).

Blair said U.S. early warning and decision-making procedures and the weapons themselves have been kept on a �hair trigger.�

When U.S. satellites detect a possible rocket launch, U.S. crews at the North American Aerospace Defense Command near Colorado Springs, Colo., have only three minutes to determine if the incident is an actual missile attack or a nonmilitary event, such as a space launch, wildfire or solar reflection off of oceans or clouds, he said. Such nonmilitary events occur daily, he said.

If a strike is suspected, then the president and his top advisers convene a telephone briefing during which an officer is given 30 seconds to brief the president on his retaliatory options and their consequences, he said.

The president then would have a few minutes to select his response to ensure that U.S. nuclear attacks could be effectively launched by underground and undersea crews minutes later, Blair said.

The majority of U.S. missiles � deployed on land, in the air and at sea � are intended for mutual deterrence against a Russian or U.S. attack, a situation Blair said has been unnecessary since the end of the Cold War.

�The dirty little secret of America�s current nuclear policy is that 99 percent of the nuclear weapons budget, planning, targeting, and operational activities still revolves around this one anachronistic scenario,� he said.

�The rationale is a throwback to the Cold War, but however absurd, it still is the axis of current nuclear operations,� he said.

�Scratch Russia from the list of enemies, as it should be, and all justification for maintaining a large U.S. nuclear arsenal evaporates,� Blair said.

Blair and other experts charged that the size of the current U.S. arsenal was kept unnecessarily large in part because of persisting Cold War suspicions within the U.S. military and also because of institutional inertia.

�A small fraction of the current U.S. arsenal of 10,650 bombs would amply cover all plausible nuclear threats to the American homeland, U.S. allies and interests overseas, if only the idea of fighting a large-scale nuclear war with Russia received the ridicule it deserves,� Blair said.

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F.  Nonproliferation Diplomacy

1.
Head Of Russian Atomic Energy Ministry Is For Preserving IAEA
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29. (RIA Novosti). Head of the Atomic Energy Ministry Alexander Rumyantsev spoke about the necessity of preserving the IAEA as an authoritative international body in the nuclear power industry.

The existence of the IAEA, its activities over a lengthy period of time has confirmed the role of this organization in control over the use of nuclear energy for the peaceful purposes," he said on Thursday to journalists.

The Minister noted that the IAEA and the national administrations are constantly conducting a far from easy dialogue. However, this cannot serve as a proof that the IAEA can be replaced by somebody, " Rumyantsev said.

"Russia is abiding by all international principles and considers the IAEA to be an important supervising body over the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes," the minister said.

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2.
Russia Views IAEA As Main Tool Of Non-Proliferation Control
ITAR-TASS
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29 (Itar-Tass) - Russia's Atomic Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev said Moscow recognized the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as the main instrument of control over non-proliferation of nuclear weapons.

"The IAEA is a time-proven mechanism of control over proliferation of fission materials which developed in the course of a historical process," Rumyantsev told reporters on Thursday.

"Libya�s recent decision to open and make its nuclear programs transparent for IAEA inspectors was another proof of the effectiveness of the IAEA's operation," he said.

In the minister's view, the Agency, "over 50 years of its operation, has shown high professionalism and impartiality of its specialists and has done very much to halt the spreading of fission materials and mass destruction weapons over the world."

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G.  Russia - Iran

1.
Russia Foreign Ministry Declares Bringing Closer of Russian and U.S. Positions On Iran's Nuclear Program
RIA Novosti
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, JANUARY 30 (RIA NOVOSTI) - The positions of Russia and the United States on the Iranian nuclear program have become noticeably closer, said a source in the Russian foreign ministry.

It is seen, particularly, from the recent talks held in Moscow with the United States' Undersecretary of State John Bolton, the source said.

"We have worked out a position common not only for Russian-American relations but also in the multilateral format," the source continued. The matter today is not only how to combat the lack of transparency in the Iranian nuclear program but how the IAEA resolution on Iraq will in fact be implemented.

The source recalled that the international community has three basic demands to Iran, contained in the resolution of the IAEA board of governors. They are - Iran's provision of information on its former activities in the nuclear field, joining the IAEA additional protocol on guarantees, discontinuing the uranium enrichment program.

"Iran is to accept all the three decisions," the source said. To him, the next step is to be a report by the IAEA head Mohammed El Baradei at the March board-of-governors session. In his report El Baradei will say how the clauses of the resolution are being implemented.

The source has suggested that "Iran-IAEA cooperation will gradually be depoliticized and passed into the sphere of technical interaction."

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2.
Russia-Iran Nuclear Ties Fully Legal: Minister
AFP
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW (AFP) Jan 30, 2004
Russia's nuclear cooperation with Iran is fully legal and transparent, Russian Atomic Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev insisted ahead of talks Friday with top US arms control diplomat John Bolton.

"We keep to international law, our actions are fully legal and transparent for the International Atomic Energy Agency, and they have no complaints against us," Rumyantsev said as quoted by the Interfax news agency.

Rumyantsev is due to travel to Iran next month to discuss speeding up the construction of a nuclear plant at Bushehr, in the south of the country, a project Russia continues despite Washington's objections.

"We are building a nuclear station (in Iran), for money. This is not some kind of aid, this is a commercial project," Rumyantsev declared.

Non-proliferation of nuclear materials and technologies as well as nuclear security would be the main topic at the meeting, Rumyantsev said.

Nevertheless Russia's nuclear cooperation with Iran is high up on the agenda of Rumyantsev's talks with Bolton, a prospect Rumyantsev viewed with some humor.

"I always say that if we did not talk about Iran, it's as if we haven't met," the minister commented.

Uranium enrichment is at the centre of international concern that Iran may be capable of building an atomic bomb. Tehran has said it reserves the right to restart enrichment "at any moment."

Russia has made completion of the Bushehr nuclear plant conditional on Iran signing an undertaking to return the spent fuel.

Russia has overridden strong objections from the United States to maintain its nuclear cooperation with Iran.

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3.
Rumyantsev To Discuss With Bolton Iranian Issue
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29, 2004. (RIA Novosti) -- At their meeting on January 30th, Russia's Nuclear Power Minister Alexander Rumyantsev and US Under-Secretary of State John Bolton will also look at the Iranian issue, Rumyantsev told journalists on Thursday.

"I will meet Bolton, and he is certain to raise the issue," he said. "It ought to be said that our dialogue on Iran has made good progress since our last meeting. Iran signed an additional protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency. This is the result of our joint efforts with the US." Rumyantsev said that they would also discuss "the regular questions raised during meetings between US representatives and those of the Nuclear Power Ministry." "Our subjects will be non-proliferation of nuclear materials, their accounting and control, and return of spent nuclear fuel from Soviet-built reactors."

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4.
Russia To Take Decision On Building Of 2nd Power Unit Of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant Soon
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29 (RIA Novosti) - The Russian side is to take a decision on the building of the second power unit of the nuclear power plant in Bushehr.

The prospects will be clear after Russian Atomic Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev's visit to Iran.

"On returning from Iran we shall be more certain on our cooperation with Iran in respect of this station," Alexander Rumyantsev told journalists on Thursday.

The visit to Iran is scheduled for February 15, he said. The Russian delegation will include representatives of the Atomic Energy Ministry, the State Committee on Nuclear Safety and Atomstroieksport company.

"We go to Iran to hold a coordination meeting on the implementation of the instructions of Bushehr-1," the Russian Atomic Energy Minister noted.

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H.  Russia - China

1.
Russian Atomic Ministry To Take Part In All Tenders Announced By China For Construction Of A Nuclear Power Station
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29 (RIA Novosti) - The Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) of the Russian Federation has confirmed its participation in all tenders announced by China for the construction of a nuclear power station, the Russian Minister for Atomic Energy, Alexander Rumyantsev told journalists in Moscow on Thursday.

"We will take part in all tenders announced by China," he said. "Who will be our agent we'll decide later." Rumyantsev stressed that an agent should possess high-level qualities. He also said that at present Minatom is maintaining close cooperation with the Atomstroiexport organization. As possible other agents the minister named the Obyedinennye Mashinostroitelnye Zavody (United Engineering Works).

At present Russia is building two units of the Tianwan atomic power station in China.

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I.  Russian Nuclear Forces

1.
Russian Atomic Energy Minister: Russia's Nuclear Arsenal Is In Complete Order
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29, 2004. (RIA Novosti) - "Russia's nuclear arsenal is in complete order," Russian Nuclear Power Minister Alexander Rumyantsev told journalists.

Rumyantsev also said that Russia's potential in the construction of nuclear power stations abroad is far higher than that its current construction volumes.


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2.
Russian, French Subs To Conduct Joint Maneuvers
Interfax
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


Russian and French nuclear submarines will hold joint exercises in the Atlantic Ocean this summer, the Russian navy's chief of staff, Admiral Viktor Kravchenko, said on Thursday. Russia will assign a nuclear-powered submarine from the Northern Fleet and a surface ship for the exercises. "The same will be done by France," Kravchenko said.

After the exercises, the Russian vessels will visit the French naval base at Brest. The maneuvers are a continuation of joint naval exercises held in the Barents Sea in July 2003, French armed forces chief of staff Gen. Henri Bentegeat said in Moscow on Tuesday. "A similar drill will be held this summer," he said

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J.  Nuclear Fuel Return

1.
Zheleznogorsk Combine Expects 13 Spent Nuclear Fuel Trains In 2004
Bellona Foundation
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


13 shipments of spent nuclear fuel from Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian nuclear power plants are expected at the Zheleznogorsk-based Mining and Chemical Combine in 2004, Nuclear.Ru reported.

This year the plant is to refurbish the first layer wells of Severny site, assembly equipment at Shop no. 1 radwaste storage tanks and carry out pilot sludge extraction from them. The spent nuclear fuel storage facility�s safety improvement program requires completion of construction a connecting gallery between buildings no.1 1 and no.2 that is to expand storage capacity up to 9,000 tons.

In 2003 the plant received nine shipments (606 fuel assemblies) from Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian nuclear plants. Also the storage facility carried out operation on reloading fuel assemblies from 12-piece into 16-piece shrouds. Full replacement of 12-piece shrouds will increase the storage capacity by 33%. The construction of the connecting gallery between building no.1 and no.2 was started to improve storage safety. A large scope of work was done to set up a protected area around storage facility and to prepare the first layer of Severny site for solutions from radiochemical plant.

The radwaste storage tanks in shop no.1 were prepared for low-activity solution tests of pulp extraction equipment. The roof repair technology, which uses overlaying material instead of the previously used roofing felt, was developed and implemented to improve operating quality and durability of roofs. The work has been started to lay a fiber optic communications cable, which would improve communication between the plant's facilities. In 2003 the preparatory work for fuel dry storage facility construction has been started, reported Nuclear.ru.

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K.  Russian Nuclear Industry

1.
No Shutdown For Armenian Nuke Plant: Russia's Vice-Premier
Hamlet Matevosyan
RIA Novosti
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


YEREVAN, JANUARY 30 (RIA Novosti correspondent Hamlet Matevosyan) - To close down the Armenian nuclear power plant is the last thing Russia intends to do. On the contrary, the plant is in for improvements to increase its output, Boris Alyoshin, Russia's Deputy Prime Minister, said to the media in Yerevan, Armenian capital, today.

"Whatever ample room for progress nuclear power industry may now leave, it certainly has a fine future," he remarked.

The European Union insists on the plant, in its seismic zone, closed down as soon as possible, and is willing to donate 100 million euros for the purpose. Armenian authorities are of a contrasting opinion - the plant is to remain active till the country receives an equal and steadily supplied amount of electricity from other sources.

The Armenian government has empowered Unified Russian Power Grid company with plant management for five years, staring September last.

Armenian nuclear plant work was suspended, March 1989, to resume, November 1995, with a bad energy crisis. Its second unit, with a first-generation reactor VVER 440, of Russian design and manufacture, accounts for an average 30 to 40 per cent of Armenia's entire electricity. Experts think the plant can safely stay in action up to 2016.

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2.
Atomic Energy Minister Accuses Rivals Of Attempts To Compromise Russia At International Nuclear Market
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29, 2004. /RIA Novosti/. Russia's Atomic Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev said Russia's rivals are concerned over the growth in the export potential of nuclear power engineering in this country and are trying to compromise Russia.

"We have emerged on the international market to stay there. This causes concern among our partners and they are trying to compromise us," the minister told reporters Thursday.

According to Rumyantsev, Russia's export potential in nuclear power in 2003 increased by $400 million and amounts to $3 billion today.

"The increase in the export potential of Russia is associated mainly with enriched uranium, the supplies of stable isotopes and construction of nuclear power plants abroad, that is, with the entire spectrum of technical services that we provide abroad," the minister said.

According to him, "in 2004 the export potential will be less than in 2003." As regards the import of spent nuclear fuel to Russia, Rumyantsev noted that in 2003 "not a single gram or irradiated nuclear fuel was brought to the Russian market from abroad." "Import and storage of spent foreign nuclear fuel is a very profitable business, and now the leaders on this market are France and Britain," he said. "Today we are not let to enter this market, which is bad, because we have possibilities for this," Rumyantsev added.

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3.
Atomic Energy Ministry To Launch Corporatization In The Sector In 2007-2008
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29, 2004. (RIA Novosti) - The Russian Atomic Energy ministry will get down to corporatizing of the sector's companies no earlier than 2007-2008, Minister Alexander Rumyantsev told the media in Moscow Thursday.

"We won't start corporatization in 2004, because we don't have enough time to introduce relevant amendments to the exiting law," he added.

He also emphasized that the companies in the sector would be, "certainly reorganized." "We have to consolidate our defense industries, to perfect the legislation, and to analyze the atomic energy market," Rumyantsev explained.

The minister believes that the nuclear sector reform requires a careful and weighted approach. According to him, it would be most convenient for the sector's companies to operate as joint-stock companies, with 100 percent of their stock owned by the government.

"It will be the form of corporatization most of the companies will choose," he said. "JSCs will be much more preferable and effective than the federal government unitary enterprises (FGUPs) we have now."

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4.
Lunar Helium-3 Production For Thermonuclear Plants To Become An Opportunity In Only 30 Years � Rumyantsev
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, JANUARY 29 (RIA NOVOSTI) - Russian Nuclear Energy Minister Alexander Rumyantsev believes that the moon can be looked upon as a promising source of helium-3, from which energy may be produced in thermonuclear reactors. He said this to journalists in Moscow on Thursday.

"Yes, the moon can be a source of energy but not in the near future. Even after 30 years we may not be producing helium for thermonuclear stations," he said.

"The economy of today prevents the use of lunar rock for the production of heluim-3," he said. "Much tritium has been stockpiled in the world. It can well be used for such ends," added the energy minister.

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5.
Russia Steps Up Nuclear Exports
RosBusinessConsulting
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


RBC, 29.01.2004, Moscow 13:00:23.In 2003, Russian exports of nuclear fuel and equipment increased by $400m and reached $3bn, Russian Minister of Atomic Energy Alexander Rumyantsev announced at a press conference today. On the whole, industrial production in the atomic energy sector grew 11.3 percent, and respective investments stepped up 14.5 percent. Furthermore, in the reported period, Russian-produced fuel assembly sales rose by 24.8 percent.

The minister noted however that it was still too early to predict Russian nuclear exports for 2004, as they would strongly depend on market conditions, that were experiencing dramatic changes currently. In any event nuclear export growth will not be lower than last year, Rumyantsev said.

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6.
Russian Atomic Energy Ministry To Decide On Building Of Floating Nuclear Power Plant In 2004
RIA Novosti
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW, January 29 (RIA Novosti) - In 2004 the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry will take a decision on the implementation of the project of the building of a floating nuclear power plant, Minister Alexander Rumyantsev told journalists on Thursday.

"We shall take a decision on the prospects of this project in 2004. Its implementation needs political will and money. This project is under discussion now," Rumyantsev said.

According to him, many countries, including India, China and Indonesia, are interested in the Russian project of the building of a floating nuclear power plant.

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L.  Nuclear Safety

1.
EU To Provide Safety Equipment To Russian Nuclear Power Plant
ITAR-TASS
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


NOVOVORONEZH (Voronezh Region), January 30 (Itar-Tass) - Experts from the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant and the European Union have discussed here ways to modernise the control system of the station�s fifth one million kilowatt reactor. They signed an agreement on the delivery to the station of equipment to modernise its control system and to make the nuclear reactor safer, Deputy Director-General of the Power Plant Alexander Revin, who is in charge of economic contacts with foreign partners, told Itar-Tass on Friday.

This job is being done in keeping with the TACIS international cooperation program and is estimated at approximately fifteen million euros. To begin with, the French DS&S SAS company will deliver to the power plant a set of equipment, worth 7.5 million euros, to modernise the reactor�s control and safety systems. Besides Russian specialists, experts from the Gundreminngen nuclear power plant (Germany) will also took part in the drafting of the blueprints to manufacture this hardware, which is expected to make the station�s radiation protection much more dependable. It is envisaged, at the next stage, to install the latest types of emergency feed water and reactor shut down systems on the plant�s fifth generating unit.

Modernisation of the fifth reactor, which was commissioned in 1980, is intended to prolong its designed service life, which expires in 2010.

Today, there are two generators with a total capacity of 1,400,000 kilowatts in operation at the Voronezh nuclear power plant. The third VVER-440 reactor is now undergoing preventive maintenance to restore the temperature control of its turbine equipment. The radiation level at the station and in the adjoining territory is normal.

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M.  Official Statements

1.
Biotechnology Cluster at Former Weapons Plant Needs $120 Million in Investment
Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan News Bulletin
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


Nuraly Bekturganov, Deputy Minister of Education and Science, said the government�s plans to develop a cluster of biotechnological enterprises based on former bioweapons plant would require $120 million in investment.

Mr. Bekturganov spoke at the January 26 presentation of 12 investment projects for the Biotechnology Park at Stepnogorsk, home to the world�s largest anthrax production and weaponization facility during the Soviet times.

According to /Kazakhstan Today/ news agency (_www.gazeta.kz)_ , he said the projects would involve deep reprocessing of wheat and creating sophisticated products from it, such as vaccines, antibiotics, substances for further production of antibiotics, and others.

Products are meant to go for domestic and external markets to be used in industries such as food and pharmaceuticals, agriculture, mining, and oil production.

The technological park, called /Progress/, includes the Stepnogorsk-based /Biomedpreparat/ enterprise, /Biopromtechnolgiya/ Institute and medical and biological faculty. It is part of the industry-specific clusters the government is creating under the innovation strategy until 2015. Other clusters include software technological park in the outskirts of Almaty and the National Nuclear Center at Kurchatov, center of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

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2.
Press Release
Press Service of the Security Council of the Russian Federation
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


Translated by RANSAC Staff

30 January. Assistant Secretary of the Security Council of the Russian Federation Oleg Chernov met today in Moscow with Senior Assistant Secretary of State of the U.S.A. John Bolton, at his request.

During the course of the discussion, problems of international security were examined, and also the urgent questions of bilateral relations. With special attention the sides defined the cooperation of the two countries in support of strategic stability, foremost in the sphere of the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

Coordination of Russian the U.S. in this direction, emphasized Oleg Chernov, has key importance for the search for adequate answers to current challenges and threats. There are at present positive dynamics in the work of completing the mission of the presidents of the two countries, decided by them last year in the Camp David summit. Oleg Chernov also noted the necessity of further strengthening of the conditions for the liquidation of chemical weapons in the Russian Federation in bilateral and multilateral formats.

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3.
Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Kislyak Meets with US Under Secretary of State John Bolton
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Daily News Bulletin
1/30/2004
(for personal use only)


On January 29 Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Kislyak received US Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security John Bolton, who had arrived in Moscow for consultations.

During the talk, a number of urgent themes of Russian-American dialogue on the issues of strategic stability, arms control and the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, including in the context of the implementation of the agreements reached by Russian and US Presidents Vladimir Putin and George W. Bush at the summit in Camp David in September 2003, were considered substantively and the importance of building up joint efforts in this field was pointed out.

January 29, 2004

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4.
Lugar Announces Collaborative Grant to Purdue University And Russian Scientists to Develop Chemical Warfare Agent Detection System
Office of Sen. Richard Lugar
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)


U.S. Sen. Dick Lugar (R-IN), in conjunction with the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation, announced today a cooperative antiterrorism research grant of $80,000 to a joint team of scientists from Purdue University and the Institute of Energy Problems of Chemical Physics in Russia. The scientists will be working to develop a small portable instrument to measure trace levels of chemical warfare agents and explosives. The grant comes from the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF).

"Those of us in Indiana know that Purdue University is a leader in many areas," said Lugar, Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. "This joint research will further solidify that reputation, while also advancing our safety and security. Equipment to detect chemical warfare agents is a vital tool in our arsenal against terrorism."

The joint U.S.-Russian team is headed by Graham Cooks of Purdue University and his Russian colleague, Eugene Nikolaev. The scientists aim to develop a technology that will enable them to miniaturize and expand the detection capabilities of mass spectrometers, highly sensitive instruments that have the ability to rapidly identify and measure the presence of minute traces of compounds in the air.

"Mass spectrometers are particularly appealing for emergency on-site analysis due to their inherent speed, precision, sensitivity, capability for continuous real-time measurements, and fairly low maintenance requirements," said Dr. Cooks. "However, the threat of unpredictable terrorist acts involving chemical warfare agents and explosives presents an urgent problem that requires a system that can operate even faster and with a greater degree of mobility than is currently available."

"Both teams have researched several approaches to this challenge and this work is ongoing. The CRDF award will help us to combine our efforts to accelerate development of a technology that will further miniaturize the instrumentation and broaden the scope of the spectrometer's applicability. The Moscow group has particular expertise in ionization methods and data handling. We are looking forward to the mass spectrometer, science's most powerful analysis tool, being available in the Star Trek tricorder format. This will produce important applications throughout society, not least in the industrial hygiene and biological areas."

The grant is part of a series of awards that fall under the CRDF's Special Competition for Research on Minimizing the Effects of Terrorist Acts on Civilian Populations. Each grant provides nine months of support to joint teams of U.S. and former Soviet scientists working on finding innovative solutions to minimize the impact of terrorist threats. The competition is the foundation's response to the events of September 11, 2001 and was authorized by the CRDF Board of Directors as a meaningful and timely contribution to the fight against terrorism. Funding for the competition comes from the U.S. Department of State, National Science Foundation, and National Institutes of Health. The CRDF is currently completing its review of additional proposals and plans to announce further cooperative research awards in the near future.

Lugar has a long history of making the world safer from the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. Since 1991, the $400 million a year Nunn-Lugar program has deactivated 6,252 nuclear warheads. It has destroyed 527 ballistic missiles, 455 ballistic missile silos, 124 bombers, 462 submarine-launched missiles, 408 submarine missile launchers, and 27 strategic missile submarines. It has sealed 194 nuclear test tunnels. More than 20,000 scientists formerly employed in weapons of mass destruction programs have been employed in cooperative, peaceful endeavors.

The U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation is a private, nonprofit organization authorized by the U.S. Congress and established by the National Science Foundation in 1995. The CRDF supports scientific and technical collaboration between the United States and other countries, primarily the countries of the former Soviet Union, through grants, technical resources, and training. The foundation also promotes the transition of weapons scientists to civilian work to help reduce the global spread of weapons of mass destruction. The CRDF is based in Arlington, Virginia with offices in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia, and Kyiv, Ukraine.

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5.
Daily Press Briefing (excerpted)
Department of State
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)


[�]

QUESTION: Mr. Boucher, can you confirm the report on Under Secretary Bolton, he's going to go to Moscow this week?

MR. BOUCHER: He left yesterday.

QUESTION: And what's the purpose? Pushing Russian to join the (inaudible) PSI?

MR. BOUCHER: It's, I think, consultations on a variety of nonproliferation issues --

QUESTION: What about --

MR. BOUCHER: Including Proliferation Security Initiative.

Does anybody remember how long he's there for? Just for the day? I can't remember. It's one or two days.

Tom?

MR. CASEY: (Off mike.) I thought it was just for two days (inaudible).

MR. BOUCHER: Okay. Anyway, he's there today. Whether he's there tomorrow or not, I'll check.

QUESTION: Okay. And also, State Department to send anybody to China on this issue, floating the China to join the PSI?

MR. BOUCHER: You know, we've had consultations with the Chinese from time to time. I can't remember when Under Secretary Bolton was last there, but it wasn't too long ago.

QUESTION: Also on Russia?

MR. BOUCHER: Yeah.

QUESTION: As I understand it, a senior Russian official in Moscow today said that the Secretary in his meetings on Monday raised the issues mentioned in the Izvestiya commentary to Foreign Minister Ivanov and did not raise them in the meeting with President Putin.

Is there anything you can say about that? Would it be unusual for the Secretary not to raise them in a meeting with the President?

MR. BOUCHER: I think, first of all, the issues regarding progress in democracy in Russia were certainly discussed openly and fairly widely during the course of the Secretary's visit. He has made clear that we have strategic cooperation with Russia in any number of areas; we want to further that cooperation in all these areas, whether it's arms control issues or bilateral relations or economic relations or cooperation on regional conflicts, but also that progress towards solidifying democracy in Russia is also a strategic issue for us, where we want to be -- try to see the progress that the Russians are making as well. And so it has been, will be a subject of discussion in -- on an ongoing basis with Russia.

He certainly had hours, many more hours of discussion with Foreign Minister Ivanov, so I suspect he had time to get into things in more detail with the Foreign Minister. But if I remember correctly, it came up at his press conference after the meeting with President Putin as well.

[�]

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6.
Swiss Support For Chemical Disarmament In The Russian Federation
Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)


Today in Moscow Switzerland and the Russian Federation signed a framework agreement on Swiss support for chemical disarmament in the Russian Federation. Switzerland plans to spend a maximum of 15 million francs over a five-year period for this support in Russia

The framework agreement was signed in Moscow today by Anne Bauty, charg�e d'affaires (A.I.) at the Swiss embassy and Viktor Kholstov, General Director of the Russian Agency for Munitions. This agreement is in line with the decision by members of both chambers of the Swiss parliament on 3 March 2003 to spend 17 million francs on the worldwide destruction of chemical weapons. It was the parliament's wish that the bulk of this money was to be used for projects in the Russian Federation. The agreement sets out in detail the conditions for this co-operation.

Switzerland is internationally active in efforts to eliminate chemical weapons. It is a contracting party to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) of 1993, which states that all chemical weapons must be destroyed by 2012 at the latest. Delays in the disposal of 40,000 tonnes of chemical weapons in the Russian Federation are endangering the punctual implementation of the convention. Several countries have therefore made funds available to facilitate the destruction of these weapons.

Promotion of disarmament is a central element of Swiss security policy. The stockpiling of chemical weapons is a threat to international security because of the risk of certain substances falling into the wrong hands, for example those of extremist groups. There is also a considerable risk of contamination of the environment as a result of leaks from chemical weapons.

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N.  Links of Interest

1.
Domestic WMD Incident Management - Legal Desk Book
Defense Threat Reduction Agency
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.dtra.mil/news/deskbook/index.html


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2.
Six Steps to a Safer America - National Security and the 2005 Budget: An Overview
Lawrence J. Korb
Center for American Progress
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.americanprogress.org/AccountTempFiles/cf/{E9245FE4-9A2B-43C7-A521..


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3.
The Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreement Between the United States of America and the IAEA
Linton Brooks
National Nuclear Security Administration
1/29/2004
(for personal use only)
http://foreign.senate.gov/testimony/2004/BrooksTestimony040129.pdf


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4.
Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy
Sen. Biden
Paul C. Warnke Conference on the Past, Present & Future of Arms Control
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)
http://biden.senate.gov/pressapp/record.cfm?id=217522


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5.
Pakistan & India: Steps Toward Rapprochement
Michael Krepon
Senate Foreign Relations Committee
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)
http://foreign.senate.gov/testimony/2004/KreponTestimony040128.pdf


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6.
Wanted: A New U.S. Policy on Russia
Sarah E. Mendelson
PONARS Memo
1/28/2004
(for personal use only)
http://csis.org/ruseura/ponars/policymemos/pm_0324.pdf


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7.
Bellona's Kharitonov to Speak in Finnish Parliament
Rashid Alimov and Charles Digges
Bellona Foundation
1/26/2004
(for personal use only)
http://www.bellona.no/en/international/russia/npps/leningrad/32360.html


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DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of RANSAC. RANSAC takes no responsibility for the technical accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.

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