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Nuclear News - 10/18/02
RANSAC Nuclear News, October 18, 2002
Compiled by Wyatt Cavalier



A. Russia-U.S
    1. Russia Adheres To Its Former ABM Treaty Stand, Yelena Glushakova, Cristina Rodrigues, RIA Novosti, October 18, 2002
    2. North Korea Active On Nuke Programmes? Russia Hopes For U.S. Information, RIA Novosti, October 18, 2002
    3. Bolton Talks To Be Success, Hopes Russia's Foreign Ministry, RIA Novosti, October 18, 2002
B. Russian Nuclear Forces
    1. Walker's World: Remember Russia's Nukes, Martin Walker, UPI, October 16, 2002
C. Minatom
    1. Igor Borovkov Appointed First Deputy Atomic Energy Minister, Interfax, October 17, 2002
    2. Russia's Nuclear Centres To Be Declassified - Atomic Energy Ministry, ITAR-TASS, October 16, 2002
D. Russia-North Korea
    1. Russia Denies Allegations That It Helped North Korea Develop Nuclear Weapons, Associated Press, October 18, 2002
    2. Russia Does Not Help North Korea Develop Its Nuclear Programme, RIA Novosti, October 18, 2002
E. Nuclear Waste
    1. Russia's New Nuclear Threat, Brad Glosserman, PAC-NET Newsletter: CSIS, October 17, 2002
    2. Russians Probe For Nuclear Waste In Sea Of Japan, Space Daily, October 17, 2002
F. Missile Defense
    1. Anti-Missile Umbrella For Sale: Russia May Take Advantage Of The New Cycle Of The Arms Race, Vladimir Urban, Novye Izvestia, October 16, 2002
G. Russian Nuclear Power Industry
    1. Russia May Construct Nuclear Power Station In Vietnam, RBC, October 17, 2002
H. Announcements
    1. Alexander Yakovenko, the Official Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Answers Russian Media's Question Regarding Reports Concerning Nuclear Program Development in DPRK, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, October 18, 2002
    2. On the Consideration by UN General Assembly of a Russia-US Joint Draft Resolution Entitled "Bilateral Strategic Nuclear Arms Reductions and New Strategic Framework", Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, October 17, 2002
    3. USEC, TENEX and Megatons to Megawatts Program Recognized by International Peace Organizations, USEC, October 16, 2002
I. Links of Interest
    1. Communicating Nuclear Risk: Informing the Public about the Risks and Realities of Nuclear Terrorism, Tonya L. Putnam, CISAC, October 2002
    2. Weapons of Mass Destruction in Central Asia, Kenley Butler, NIS Nonproliferation Program: Center for Nonproliferation Studies, October 2002

A. Russia-U.S.

1.
Russia Adheres To Its Former ABM Treaty Stand
Yelena Glushakova, Cristina Rodrigues
RIA Novosti
October 18, 2002
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Now, three months after the USA's de facto withdrawal from the ABM treaty of 1972, Russia still considers that there were no serious grounds for abolishing this treaty, Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov said Friday at a press-conference in Moscow. He pointed to the fact that recent events testified to this thesis being justified. It is not from the sky that one is threatened but from acts of terrorists and crazy snipers that cannot be shielded by anti-missile defence, said the minister. One can build up defence muscles but is helpless in protecting oneself from such challenges as international terrorism, he added.

He found relevant however those decisions which were taken at the Moscow Russia-USA summit last May.

The signing of the START-3 was no compensation for the withdrawal from the ABM treaty of 1972 but we did not interrupt the talks and managed to come to adopt a very important document, said Ivanov.

"It was a valuable indication of a trend to follow," he concluded.
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2.
North Korea Active On Nuke Programmes? Russia Hopes For U.S. Information
RIA Novosti
October 18, 2002
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The USA suspects North Korea of illegally working on at nuclear programmes. Russia looks forward to get extensive information from John Bolton, Undersecretary of State, who is visiting Russia next week, Igor Ivanov, Russia's Minister of Foreign Affairs, said to a news conference in Moscow. Russia also hopes to receive related information from Pyongyang.

It takes comprehensive knowledge of the issue to make conclusions from a White House public statement on that score. Meanwhile, Russia knows only the facts the statement offers, remarked the minister.

Russia is consistently working for mass destruction weapons nonproliferation, and its efforts concern all countries without exception, stressed Mr. Ivanov.
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3.
Bolton Talks To Be Success, Hopes Russia's Foreign Ministry
RIA Novosti
October 18, 2002
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - Next week's Moscow negotiations with John Bolton, US Undersecretary of State, will come as part of regular bilateral exchanges on strategic stability in the context of presidential contacts at an upcoming APEC summit in Mexico's Los Cabos, Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs says in a statement before Mr. Bolton's routine visit of October 21-22.

The visitor will meet with Igor Ivanov, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and top officers of several Russian federal agencies. He will have consultations with Georgi Mamedov, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Vladimir Rushailo, Secretary of Russia's Security Council.

The negotiators will analyse compliance with bilateral Moscow and Kananaskis summit decisions to implement the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty. They will consider blueprints for the political and legal bases of ABM teamwork, and for launching a G-8 global partnership initiative against mass destruction arms and materials proliferation.

Developments round Iraq, in South Asia and in the Korean peninsula will be prominent on the agenda alongside other burning military-political issues of bilateral and global relations.
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B. Russian Nuclear Forces

1.
Walker's World: Remember Russia's Nukes
Martin Walker
UPI
October 16, 2002
(for personal use only)


WASHINGTON -- Under the command of the Russia's General Staff, the Strategic Rocket Forces mounted last Saturday their most ambitious nuclear and missile exercise since the fall of the Soviet Union.

They tested all three legs of the strategic triad, simultaneously launching three intercontinental ballistic missiles from land and from submarine and also delivered a nuclear strike by four strategic bombers firing standoff missiles.

Two of the bombers were Tu-95s, the old Soviet equivalent, at least in age, of America's B-52s. Dating from the 1950s, and powered by turboprops, they were known to NATO as the "Bear." The other two were Tu-160 Blackjack bombers, the equivalent of the American B-1.

No nuclear warheads were involved in the test, only the missiles that would deliver them. This was a command exercise, testing the countdown and failsafe and launch and control procedures, as well as the 4,500-mile trajectories of the ICBMs. All went according to plan, as monitored by the radars of Russia's new "Space Force," and by the Titov test center of Spacecraft Command.

They did not test the nukes; there is a Test Ban Treaty, after all. But then, the Russians have no shortage of nuclear warheads. At last count, they admitted to more than 7,000.

There have been few better demonstrations of the degree to which Russia remains a serious nuclear power, with military capabilities that put the other main nuclear pretenders, China and Britain and France, Israel, India and Pakistan, into suitably modest perspective. This was the biggest exercise for Russia's Strategic Air Force since the sudden cancellation on Sept. 11 last year -- in deference to American concerns after the terrorist attacks -- of a three-day exercise with the navy's Pacific and Northern fleets, operations that might have come uncomfortably close to U.S. territory in Alaska at a hypersensitive time.

In its own commentary on the exercise, the Russian newspaper Vremya Novostei proposed various theories to explain the timing, and the scale, of this exercise, which the Russian General Staff said was a relatively routine test of command procedures to wind up the summer training cycle.

One of the newspaper's sources said it was a none-too-subtle reminder to the West of Russian capabilities, in the month before the NATO summit at Prague formally accepts the enlargement of the alliance, and as the American forces gather around Iraq. Another source suggested that it was a preemptive response to U.S. plans, picked up by Russian intelligence, to reactivate an American nuclear test site. Yet another source, said to be close to Russian counter-intelligence, claimed that the highly expensive exercise was carried out at the suggestion of the United States to test "its own means of deterrent to the declining, but still adequate, nuclear might of the Russian Federation."

This instinctive Russian assumption that they remain such a great power that the Americans watch their every move, or that every Russian initiative has its American response (or inspiration) is touching, although possibly naïve. The U.S. military and intelligence, like their political masters, are spending less time and energy on Russia these days, and the Russian General Staff know it. The Americans also know how much expense and effort and staff time the Russians put into their exercises, and how seldom Moscow can afford to run them.

So it's tempting to think that if Russia was sending anyone a message with this reminder of its nuclear versatility, then the intended recipients were probably those to the south. The wretched performance of the Russian troops in Chechnya, along with Russian acquiescence in the installation of the U.S. military in Central Asia, has left Russia with an enfeebled image in the region.

And nukes matter. Just ask Saddam Hussein. Or consider the concern in Washington over Russia's construction of a nuclear power station for Iran at Bushehr. Periods of tension between India and Pakistan in the past attracted barely a fraction of the international alarm provoked over the last year by the tensions over Kashmir between the two new nuclear powers. So a reminder to Russia's Asian neighbors of Russia's full-spectrum nuclear capability could have its uses.

But the Russian nuclear exercise coincided with another important military test over the weekend, the fourth successful test in a row of the U.S. anti-missile defense program. A modified Minuteman ICBM target vehicle was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and the prototype interceptor was fired 22 minutes later and 4,800 miles away from Kwajalein atoll. Six minutes later, and 140 miles above the earth, the target was hit right on the nose.

As America's National Missile Defenses begin to look rather more credible, the real message of Russia's strategic exercise may have been to remind the United States, and to reassure itself, that even if the odd ICBM can now be shot down, an old and impoverished superpower that can still deliver nukes from land and sea and from the air must still be taken seriously.
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C. Minatom

1.
Igor Borovkov Appointed First Deputy Atomic Energy Minister
Interfax
October 17, 2002
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The Russian government has appointed Igor Borovkov as first deputy atomic energy minister, the government's information department reports.

The Atomic Energy Ministry told Interfax that Borovkov was most recently deputy chairman of the government's defense sector department. In 1982-1987, he worked at the Atomic Energy Ministry.

By a separate decree, Lev Ryabev was relieved of the post of first deputy atomic energy minister due to his retirement.
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2.
Russia's Nuclear Centres To Be Declassified - Atomic Energy Ministry
ITAR-TASS
October 16, 2002
(for personal use only)


Novouralsk: The Russian Atomic Energy Ministry does not rule out the possibility of lifting classification restrictions from Russia's leading nuclear centres.

"Russia's towns around facilities of the Atomic Energy Ministry will be opened in the near future," Atomic Energy Minister Aleksandr Rumyantsev said during a trip to the middle Urals on Wednesday [16 October].

He mentioned Novouralsk, Snezhinsk, Angarsk, Arzamas, Zelenogorsk and a number of other centres in the Urals and Siberia.

"This cannot happen instantly, though, because nuclear centres' products and the national defence complex form an integral whole," he said.
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D. Russia-North Korea

1.
Russia Denies Allegations That It Helped North Korea Develop Nuclear Weapons
Associated Press
October 18, 2002
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW - The Russian Foreign Ministry on Friday angrily denied allegations that Moscow was providing assistance to a nuclear weapons program in North Korea, which stunned the world by apparently acknowledging its determination to become a nuclear power.

"This has absolutely nothing to do with reality," Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Yakovenko said in response to the allegations that Russia and China were helping advance Pyongyang's drive to obtain nuclear weapons.

The New York Times reported that U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that Pakistan was a major supplier of equipment North Korea needed to restart its nuclear program, while China and Russia were less prominent contributors.

Yakovenko insisted that Russia had fully met its obligations under international agreements barring nuclear proliferation. "We even suspended our cooperation with North Korea in the area of peaceful use of nuclear energy after Pyongyang declared its pullout from the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty," Yakovenko said in a statement released to the media.

"We haven't had any contacts with North Korea in this area ever since," he added.

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State James Kelly led a delegation to Pyongyang earlier this month that confronted North Korean officials with information that Pyongyang was developing nuclear weapons in violation of its 1994 pledge to freeze its nuclear weapons program. At first, the North Koreans denied the allegation but then acknowledged that Kelly's contention was correct, according to Washington.
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2.
Russia Does Not Help North Korea Develop Its Nuclear Programme
RIA Novosti
October 18, 2002
(for personal use only)


MOSCOW -- Moscow categorically denies allegations of Western mass-media that Russia helps North Korea develop its nuclear programme., According to Russian Foreign Ministry official spokesman Alexander Yakovenko, "Russia, being a depositary of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), undertakes permanent measures at ensuring the Treaty's strategic stability." Alexander Yakovenko stressed that Russia had even "suspended its co-operation with North Korea for the peaceful use of nuclear energy in 1993, after Pyongyang had declared its abrogation of NPT, and has had no contacts with North Korea in this sphere ever since." At the same time, well-informed Russian experts claim that the only country that has continued its co-operation with North Korea in this sphere is the United States. To a certain extent, this is also true for Japan and South Korea. Experts are unaware of other possible partners of North Koreans in this sphere. Probably, a serious scandal is about to break out in the US itself, and someone is trying to avoid responsibility.

Experts stress that currently there is no much information about North Korea's nuclear programme, but it can hardly be a large-scale one, for merely technological and financial reasons. Experts do not rule it out that Pyongyang uses this information for diplomatic reasons. Neither is it ruled out that facts can emerge soon that will be confusing for private structures close to nuclear circles of the US, Japan, South Korea, if not their governments.

In this situation, it is apparently crucial to continue the process of negotiations between North Korea and the rest of the world. This can reveal the true meaning of many statements and facts.
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E. Nuclear Waste

1.
Russia's New Nuclear Threat
Brad Glosserman
PAC-NET Newsletter: CSIS
October 17, 2002
(for personal use only)


VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Hundreds of nuclear submarines float quietly at their berths throughout the Russian Federation. The end of the Cold War has not ended the threat posed by these sleek gray killing machines. Today, however, concern focuses on the environmental risks created by the decommissioning of these submarines. The disposal of their spent fuel and other forms of radioactive waste is a major environmental challenge for Russia and the entire region. International cooperation has played a critical role in the decommissioning process, but considerably more help is needed. Concerned governments will primarily contribute desperately needed funds; Russia can provide expertise and manpower, but first it must provide the basic infrastructure - most important, the rule of law - that will permit those resources to be put to their intended use.

The Soviet Union built nearly 250 nuclear submarines, never contemplating how they would be taken out of service. The fleet was bequeathed to the Russian Federation, which has struggled, largely unsuccessfully, with obsolescence. Old age, arms control treaties, and budget shortfalls have forced the Russians to pull a growing number of the submarines out of service. Currently, 190 nuclear powered submarines (NPS) are scheduled for decommissioning. Seventy-six submarines have had their reactors unloaded; 21 have been dismantled and another 55 are waiting to be decommissioned. Forty-two reactors are still loaded with fuel, some of which have been removed from the submarines.

The numbers are both confusing and unreliable. At a recent conference* hosted by Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy (MINATOM), attendees huddled regularly to compare figures and find out what the real numbers were. The above statistics represent the consensus view.

Despite the confusion, one thing is painfully clear: the number of subs to be decommissioned is far greater than Russia's ability to deal with them. Speaking at the MINATOM conference, A.I. Yunak, chief of technological safety of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, was explicit: "The recycling capacity of the navy ship repair yards and civil industry are low and do not meet the recycling rate." There is, he underlined, "the impossibility of timely recycling."

The numbers bear him out. By 2010, 131 submarines will still be waiting to be decommissioned. In the meantime, the subs sit at their berths, with their hulls rusting. There are many dangers: In addition to the risk of "a loss of buoyancy" (in plain language, they sink, which has happened to a couple of the subs), they tempt hard-pressed locals who will steal anything that can be resold. Several incidents have already been reported and a few serious mishaps narrowly averted. Although the theft of nuclear materials is possible, it is unlikely.

The greater danger is a radiological accident during the decommissioning process, which is long and complex. It involves moving the subs to a central facility, offshore defueling, storing the spent nuclear fuel and the wastes generated during that process, and the eventual removal and disposal of all wastes associated with decommissioning. No link in the chain is secure. Even the train lines needed to move materials from the Zvezda Far Eastern Shipyard in Bolshoi Kamen, a couple of hours north of Vladivostok, which is the chief recycling facility for Russia's Pacific Fleet, are in disrepair.

In addition to the "ordinary" risks, there are three submarines with damaged reactor cores that need special care in recycling.

Russian experts have highlighted "a number of urgent problems" in the decommissioning process. The train lines are one bottleneck, as is the lack of storage facilities on land and on water for low-level wastes.

A critical concern is the service vessels that are used to prepare the submarines for decommissioning. According to Russian sources, six of these "floating shops" are damaged and "of grave concern." "The equipment used in unloading and transportation operations is worn and needs overhaul, which has become one of the reasons of radioactive substances [have been] released into the environment in spent nuclear fuel unloading." Extensive use has turned these ships into "radiation hazardous objects." They are now part of the problem, and need to be recycled as soon as possible.

Russia estimates that the total cost of decommissioning the Pacific Fleet submarines is about $3.9 billion; $60 million is needed for this year alone. The international community has been helping. The U.S. provides some funds, but that assistance has been limited to strategic submarines: attack subs, which don't carry intercontinental ballistic missiles, are not covered. The U.S., Russia, and Norway cooperate in the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation Program, which addresses spent fuel nuclear and waste management and storage. As the name suggests, it has focused on submarines located in the Arctic, which excludes the Far East region. The International Atomic Energy Agency and NATO have cooperated with Russia in dismantling nuclear powered submarines and storing the spent fuel. Recognizing that dumping radioactive waste was a threat to its own environment, the Japanese government has provided funds too. Unfortunately, only one project has materialized over the last decade: the construction of Landysh, or Suzeran, a floating facility to process low-level liquid wastes.

At the MINATOM conference, Japanese and British officials expressed in unusually blunt language their frustration over the difficulties in helping the Russians. Diplomats explained that they had money, but they needed legal guarantees before they could commit funds, and they were not forthcoming. "We are not satisfied with the slow pace of implementation," complained one Japanese participant. The failure to move forward exacerbates the problems: not only does it increase the risk of an accident, but Zvezda, and facilities like it, are losing expertise as skilled individuals leave the region to find employment elsewhere. That means that when the money comes through, it may be too late.

In addition to tackling the nuclear waste problem directly, scientists from the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories, have proposed that the Zvezda site be monitored for radioactive emissions. CMC, in cooperation with the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP), provides similar data at its nuclear energy transparency web site [www.cscap.nuctrans.org]. That project is part of an ongoing attempt to create new norms of transparency regarding nuclear energy in the Asia Pacific region. Russia, along with the U.S., Japan, Korea, and Taiwan contribute real-time data on radiation emissions from various nuclear facilities. John Olsen, a senior scientist at Sandia and the author of the project, believes Japan should have a natural interest in supporting the program, especially since it could be effected by radiation emissions during the decommissioning process.

Russia is rightfully concerned about the submarine decommissioning problem, and has expressed both an understanding of the need and desire for international assistance to deal with this issue. To their credit, Russia's neighbors and other concerned governments have signaled their willingness to help. It is up to Moscow to lay the foundation for long-term collaboration.

*"Ecological Problems in Nuclear-Powered Submarines Decommissioning and the Development of the Nuclear Power in the Region," Sept. 16-20, 2002, Vladivostok, Russia.
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2.
Russians Probe For Nuclear Waste In Sea Of Japan
Space Daily
October 17, 2002
(for personal use only)


A Russian scientific inspection team has finished probing for nuclear waste in the Sea of Japan, where Russia's navy has been accused of dumping radioactive material, it was announced on Thursday.

The official team, which carried out its work from a scientific research ship, inspected two particular areas at a depth of 2900 metres (9,500 feet) and 3500 metres with remote-controlled radioactive monitoring equipment.

In addition to measuring the radioactivity levels in the zone, the scientists took samples of water and marine plants which are being tested in laboratories, emergencies ministry official Ilya Kozlov told the Interfax-AVN news agency.

"The research will be concluded as quickly as possible and the results of our work in the Sea of Japan will be available already in November," he added.

The official did not say how long the probe had lasted.

A investigative Russian journalist, Grigory Pasko, who exposed nuclear waste dumping by the navy, is currently serving a four-year sentence for treason in a penal colony in Russia's Far East.

A former naval officer, in 1993 he exposed illegal dumping of chemical and liquid radioactive waste by the fleet in the Sea of Japan, and handed over his expose to Japanese media.

Pasko was working in Vladivostok as a correspondent for the Pacific Fleet's newspaper, Boyevaya Vakhta.

Russia's human rights ombudsman Oleg Mironov has criticized the case against Pasko, saying that it was aimed at putting pressure on environmentalists was damaging Russia's image and discrediting its legal system.
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F. Missile Defense

1.
Anti-Missile Umbrella For Sale: Russia May Take Advantage Of The New Cycle Of The Arms Race
Vladimir Urban
Novye Izvestia
October 16, 2002
(for personal use only)


The US continues tests of its missile defense system. However, china is reported to have design a missile able to break through that shield. In this context, it is just the time for russia to offer some of its developments in the missile defense field for sale.

The Pentagon has announced the fourth test of the national missile defense system. Yesterday, an interceptor missile launched from the Ronald Reagan testing area in the Marshall Islands downed a training warhead of a Minuteman intercontinental ballistic missile. It was the first time that a destroyer participated in targeting a missile at the warhead of Minuteman. The destroyer was equipped with the Igis radar system. In the opinion of our source in the Russian general Staff, the US has made a principal decision to approach its nuclear shield to the borders of Russia and China. That is why the Pentagon has activated its tests of sea-based components of the missile defense system lately. Our source has noted in this connection that anti-ballistic missiles have been launched from the cruiser Lake Erie for several times. He has said in this connection, "The next test of destruction of a missile target will involve the aiming systems and the weapon system based on ships. As a result, Americans will give up the idea of construction of underground bases of the national anti- missile defense system and will construct them in the ocean, as close to the potential threat as possible."

Russia is unable to secure its entire territory against the American anti-missile system. The Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) treaty of 1972, from which the US withdrew this year, allowed Russia deploying anti-ballistic systems only around Moscow. However, even this system has not been modernized for almost one-fourth of the century. There are launchers for A-350 interception missiles at six positions here. However, on October 3, the Space Forces have conducted a successful test launching of an anti-ballistic missile at the testing area of Sary-Shagan, Kazakhstan. This missile had been delivered there from Russia, where it had been deployed for over 20 years. According to some sources, this test was aimed not only at proving the reliability of A-350 missiles but also at trying the systems before modernization of the anti-ballistic missiles. Thus, Russia, too, is trying to react to changes in the world caused by the abolition of the ABM treaty.

We are unable to adequately respond to the deployment of the national anti-missile defense system for financial reasons. However, Russia could make a lot of money from the anti-missile umbrella. Moscow and Washington have already been conducting unofficial negotiations on this topic for nearly a year.

According to the Pentagon's sources, China has already built a CSS-5 missile able to pierce the American missile defense system. During tests conducted last summer, a CSS-5 missile carrying a nuclear warhead over a distance of almost 2,000 kilometers successfully avoided several "airborne destructive objects". The US administration has sent a special memorandum on this topic to Taiwan and Japan, since this missile could well reach their coasts. This warning obviously has a specific aim: to share American anti-missile technologies. So far, the Pentagon believes that after its system is fully deployed in 2006, it will be able to intercept only two single-warhead ICBMs. But the new wave of the arms race has been launched, and Beijing seems to have accepted the Pentagon's challenge. It is time for Russia to offer its developments in the anti-ballistic field for sale.

(Translated by Kirill Frolov)
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G. Russian Nuclear Power Industry

1.
Russia May Construct Nuclear Power Station In Vietnam
RBC
October 17, 2002
(for personal use only)


The Russian Atomic Ministry is considering the possibility of constructing a nuclear power station in Vietnam, the press service of the Ministry told RosBusinessConsulting. Last week Russian Atomic Minister Alexander Rumyantsev and Vietnamese Industry Minister Hoang Trung Hai negotiated on financial terms of a project on constructing the station.

The Atomic Ministry pointed out that the project was "very promising". It may take some 12 years to put into operation one energy unit and its cost may be from $1bn to $1.5bn. Such countries as Japan, France, China and South Korea are also interested in constructing the station.

Russia and Vietnam signed an agreement on collaboration in the sphere of use of nuclear energy in 2001.
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H. Announcements

1.
Alexander Yakovenko, the Official Spokesman of Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Answers Russian Media's Question Regarding Reports Concerning Nuclear Program Development in DPRK
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
October 18, 2002


Question: Could you comment on Western media allegations that Russia and China were helping the DPRK with the development of its nuclear program?

Answer: This absolutely does not conform to the truth. Russia, as the depositary of the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT Treaty), has continually been exerting efforts to strengthen this important Treaty for the ensuring of strategic stability.

We even suspended our cooperation with the DPRK in peaceful uses of atomic energy in 1993 after Pyongyang's statement about its withdrawal from the NPT Treaty and have had no contacts with the DPRK in this area since.
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2.
On the Consideration by UN General Assembly of a Russia-US Joint Draft Resolution Entitled "Bilateral Strategic Nuclear Arms Reductions and New Strategic Framework"
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
October 17, 2002


In the First Committee of the UN General Assembly Russia and the United States introduced for consideration a joint draft resolution entitled "Bilateral Strategic Nuclear Arms Reductions and New Strategic Sramework."

The draft emphasizes, in particular, the great importance of the Moscow agreements signed by the presidents of the two countries in May, this year, evidencing the new character of the strategic relationship between Russia and the US, which will be shaped on the basis of the principles of mutual security, trust, openness and predictability.

As the general political debate that took place in the Committee has shown, all delegations noted the signing of the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty as the most important event of this year in the realm of arms limitation and disarmament and gave a positive assessment to the Russian-US agreements, regarding them as an important factor in the maintenance of strategic stability.

In this connection Moscow is looking for early ratification of the SOR Treaty simultaneously by the Russian and US parliaments.
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3.
USEC, TENEX and Megatons to Megawatts Program Recognized by International Peace Organizations
USEC
October 16, 2002


Bethesda, MD-USEC Inc., TENEX and the Megatons to Megawatts program were recognized for their contribution to world peace in a ceremony held Saturday in Switzerland.

The Megatons to Megawatts program implements a U.S.-Russian government agreement to convert 500 metric tons of Russian weapons-grade uranium-equivalent to 20,000 nuclear warheads-into clean-burning fuel for electric power plants. USEC and its Russian partner, TENEX, carry-out this 20-year, $8 billion program on commercial terms, at no cost to taxpayers.

Since 1994, the Megatons to Megawatts program has eliminated more than 150 metric tons of bomb-grade uranium-the equivalent of 6,000 nuclear warheads-and produced enough fuel to power a city the size of Boston for about 230 years.

USEC, TENEX and the electric utilities who use the Megatons to Megawatts fuel were among those honored during the Demiurgus Peace International Award Ceremony held in Zug, Switzerland on October 12. The event recognizes individuals and organizations for their outstanding achievements in strengthening peace among nations. The event is organized and sponsored by the World Council of Former Foreign Ministers and the Nuclear Disarmament Forum.

In recognition of their important contribution to the program, the U.S. electric utilities using the Megatons to Megawatts fuel were presented with an Isaiah Swords Into Plowshares Award by USEC. Nuclear Energy Institute President and Chief Executive Officer Joe Colvin accepted the award on behalf of these utilities.

USEC Inc. (NYSE: USU), a global energy company, is the world's leading supplier of enriched uranium fuel for commercial nuclear power plants.
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I. Links of Interest

1.
Communicating Nuclear Risk: Informing the Public about the Risks and Realities of Nuclear Terrorism
Tonya L. Putnam
CISAC
October 2002
(for personal use only)
http://ldml.stanford.edu/pubs.iis?-database=publ&-layout=view&-response=viewpub.html&-recordID=35737&-token.cntr=cisac&-search
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2.
Weapons of Mass Destruction in Central Asia
Kenley Butler
NIS Nonproliferation Program: Center for Nonproliferation Studies
October 2002
http://www.nti.org/e_research/e3_19b.html


DISCLAIMER: Nuclear News is presented for informational purposes only. Views presented in any given article are those of the individual author or source and not of RANSAC. RANSAC takes no responsibility for the technical accuracy of information contained in any article presented in Nuclear News.



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