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Nuclear News - 08/14/02
RANSAC Nuclear News, August 14, 2002
Compiled by David Smigielski



A. Cooperative Threat Reduction
    1. Long-Awaited US Waiver Releases Millions In CTR Funds - Temporarily, Charles Digges, Bellona, August 10, 2002
B. Spent Nuclear Fuel
    1. Zheleznogorsk Mining And Chemical Combine Receives Spent Fuel From South Ukraine NPP, Bellona, August 14, 2002
    2. First Container For Used Nuclear Fuel Built In Zaporizhzhya, Interfax, August 13, 2002
    3. Bulgaria Signs Spent Nuclear Fuel Housecleaning Deal With Russia, Charles Digges, Bellona, August 13, 2002
    4. Russian Atomic Ministry To Launch New Reactor By 2012, Interfax, August 12, 2002
    5. A Consignment Of Spent Nuclear Fuel Arrives From Ukraine At Chemical Processing Works Near Krasnoyarsk, Boris Ivanov, RIA Novosti, August 12, 2002
    6. Ukraine And Russia Negotiate Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments, Bellona, August 7, 2002
C. Russian Nuclear Power Industry
    1. Russia's Nuclear Energy Utility To Apply For Loan In Commercial Banks, Bellona, August 14, 2002
    2. Russia Plans Building Of Floating Nuke Reactor, Associated Press, August 13, 2002
D. Russia-Iran
    1. Atomic Energy Ministry Prepares Documents On Returning Spent Nuclear Fuel To Russia From Iran, Interfax, August 13, 2002
E. Nuclear Smuggling/Terrorism
    1. Second Stage Of Program To Search For Radiation Sources In Georgia Begins, David Imedashvili, RIA Novosti, August 12, 2002
F. Announcements
    1. Russian Deputy Minister Of Foreign Affairs Yuri Fedotov Meets With Jayantha Dhanapala, The UN Under-Secretary-General For Disarmament Affairs, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, August 14, 2002
    2. Under-Secretary-General To Visit Central Asia For Talks On Nuclear-Weapon Free Zone, United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs, August 12, 2002
    3. Russian Minister Of Foreign Affairs Igor Ivanov Speaks To US Secretary Of State Colin Powell By Telephone, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, August 12, 2002
G. Links of Interest
    1. Facts About "Dirty Bombs" For Industrial Hygienists, AIHA, August 2002
    2. No SORT Of Verification, Nikolai Sokov, Trust and Verify, July/August 2002
    3. USEC Reports FY 2002 Financial Results, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, July 31, 2002

A. Cooperative Threat Reduction

1.
Long-Awaited US Waiver Releases Millions In CTR Funds - Temporarily
Charles Digges
Bellona
August 10, 2002
(for personal use only)


US President George Bush signed a temporary waiver this week that willallow millions of dollars to be released to programmes aimed at reducingthe threat posed by Russia's deteriorating nuclear, biological andchemical weapons infrastructure.

But the flow of non-proliferation cash will run dry again on Oct.1unless congressional proponents of the so-called Nunn-Lugar act -officially known as the Cooperative Threat Reduction act, or CTR - canrally enough support in Congress to turn what is currently an annualcertification process into a permanent waiver, a congressional aide toldBellona web Friday.

Under current legislation, the Pentagon must "certify" Russia ascommitted to non-proliferation, or else roughly one-third of CTRactivities controlled by the US military shuts down. That certificationprocess is run on a fiscal-year basis, which is why the waiver thatPresident Bush signed Wednesday - 11 months into the 2002 fiscal year -is valid only for slightly more than a month and a half.

The administration of Bill Clinton signed the certification every year.But last spring, the Pentagon and the Bush administration told Russianot to expect certification because the Kremlin was allegedlywithholding information about its chemical and biological warfareinfrastructure.

The US administration was further concerned that Russia might still bedeveloping unconventional weapons, and thus decided not to grantcertification, administration sources said at the time. Instead, theadministration asked Congress to permit President Bush to waive thecertification on grounds that the CTR programmes were in America'snational interest.

The denial of certification also meant - rather embarrassingly for theBush administration that the warhead cuts agreed to at the May summit inMoscow between Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin, could notbegin to be realized, even though orders for warhead decommissioningbegan to pile up with the US Defence Department several days before thesummit, one government official said.

The current waiver, which was signed by President Bush on Wednesday,according to the congressional aide, will release some $450 million inUS Defence Department-managed funding and $70 million worth ofprogrammes run by the State Department that have been affected by theimpasse.

Between now and October - when Congress will debate on whether thecertification process will continue annually, or will receive apermanent waiver as part of the US Defence Appropriations bill - thecongressional aide told Bellona Web that CTR will pour the newlyreleased funding into a number of new programmes that were stalled bythe US administration's decision not to certify CTR last Spring.

The source said these new projects will include: security enhancementsat 10 Russian weapons sites; training to enhance the reliability ofguards at storage sites; the decommissioning of two missile submarines;the decommissioning of 30 sea-to-land ballistic missiles (SLBMs); thedecommissioning of an unspecified number of SS-24 and SS-25 missilesthat are loaded on trains and shuttled around the countryside; and averification visit by US officials to the Mayak Chemical Combine, whichis approaching completion of a CTR-funded weapons-grade plutoniumrepository.

Conservatives in Congress have resisted granting the latitude that apermanent waiver would carry, citing suspicions that Russia may still bedeveloping germ and chemical weapons in military labs that remain closedto foreigners.

But both former Senator Sam Nunn, a Democrat from the state of Georgia,and Senator Richard Lugar, a Republican from Indiana, who created theCTR programme 11 years ago, this week separately welcomed thePresident's signing of the waiver. But they also warned that theprogramme would be in constant jeopardy unless Congress granted apermanent waiver.

"Getting the permanent waiver is crucial. Otherwise we'll get boggeddown in this re certification every year, which puts six, eight, 10months' gaps in the programme," the congressional aide told Bellona Web.

"My guess is that we will get the permanent waiver, but Congress isgoing to have to work hard for it," he said.

The temporary waiver came as Russian scientists, attending a smallpoxconference in Lyon, France, disclosed new information about a suspiciousoutbreak of that disease in 1971 that some experts say was caused by aSoviet biological weapons test on an island in the Aral Sea in the nowindependent Kazakhstan, the New York Times reported.

The congressional aide, however, said there was "no connection at all"between the statements made by the Russian scientists in France andBush's signing of the temporary waiver.

Nevertheless - because the Bush Administration's initial reasons for notsigning the CTR certification centred around doubts about Russia'sforthrightness regarding its biological and chemical weaponscapabilities - officials at the Lyon conference said that Russia'swillingness to discuss the incident showed progress, the Times reported.

At the conference, the Russian scientists said they had destroyed sometissue samples and biological material, which the United States hadhoped might shed light on the outbreak that killed two children and ayoung woman before it was contained, the paper said.

The Russian delegation said in informal discussions that they consideredthe outbreak in Aralsk to have been of natural causes, which is at oddswith a report about the incident, released last June by the MontereyInstitute of International Studies.

According to the Times, the Monterey report said that the outbreak beganafter a ship doing ecological research in the Aral Sea sailed too closeto Vozrozhdeniye Island, where a military smallpox test then under waysent out a deadly plume of germs, infecting a crew member, who carriedthe virus back to the city.

Although officials in Kazakhstan have investigated the epidemic'sorigins, Moscow has never acknowledged that it happened or that smallpoxwas ever tested in the open air, the paper reported.

But the Monterey researchers asserted that the strain of smallpox virusin Aralsk appeared to have been unusually potent, raising questionsabout whether America's smallpox vaccine would work in the event of anoutbreak of this particular strain there, said the Times.

The Russians said, according to officials familiar with the discussionsin Lyon, that although clinical tissue samples from those infected inAralsk had been taken at the time, the material was destroyed whenRussia quietly moved its smallpox strains from a lab in Moscow to theVector Institute in Siberia, where the country's large collection ofsmallpox strains is now stored, the Times reported.

The Russian scientists also reported that there was nothing irregularabout the tissue samples removed from Aralsk, but this was viewed withwide scepticism at the conference, the Times said.
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B. Spent Nuclear Fuel
1.
Zheleznogorsk Mining And Chemical Combine Receives Spent Fuel FromSouth-Ukraine NPP
Bellona
August 14, 2002
(for personal use only)


A train laden with spent nuclear fuel from South-Ukraine NPP arrived toZheleznogorsk, Central Siberia, on August 12th. The train is comprisesof seven cars with a load capacity of six tones each. No incidentsduring transportation were reported. The train was guarded by InteriorMinistry troops and Zheleznogorsk combine representatives. The unloadingis to take place shortly into a wet storage facility for VVER-1000 whichwas originally built as a part of infrastructure for RT-2 reprocessingplant. The construction of RT-2 has not been completed yet. The storagefacility can hold 6,000 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel and is currentlymore than 50% full. It needs repairs and upgrade, but there is nofunding to carry it out.
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2.
First Container For Used Nuclear Fuel Built In Zaporizhzhya
Interfax
August 13, 2002
(for personal use only)


The Zaporyzhzhya Nuclear Power Plant's Non-Standard Equipment andPipeline Plant has manufactured a test container for dry storage of usednuclear fuel, the plant reports on its site.

The plant is prepared to start manufacturing such containers on aregular basis and is clearing documentation with the researchinstitutions that support it. The plant is also cooperating with DukeEngineering and Service in the transfer of technology and obtaining alicense for manufacturing the containers. The plant intends to makeeleven containers before the end of the year. The plant wants to makecontainers first and foremost for the Zaporizhzhya station, and laterfor all Ukrainian nuclear power stations. Similar containers are notmade in Ukraine now.

The plant's production line for manufacturing the containers wascommissioned on May 19,2000. A container can store used fuel for 50 years, after which it mustbe processed or buried.
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3.
Bulgaria Signs Spent Nuclear Fuel Housecleaning Deal With Russia
Charles Digges
Bellona
August 13, 2002
(for personal use only)


A government agreement with Ukraine has paved the way for the firstround of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) imports to Russia from Bulgaria'sKozlodui nuclear power plant since a financial scandal about paymentsfor past shipments shut them down last year. The shipments, routedthrough Ukraine, are expected to resume by the end of this year,Bulgarian officials said Monday.

But the parameters of the plan, as outlined by one Bulgarian official,hint at a dubious motivation to clear that country of as muchradioactive waste as cheaply as possible before its prospectivemembership in the European Union (EU) takes effect - a membership thatcarries with it restrictions that ban sending toxic waste to countriesthat are not considered by EU authorities to be technologically capableof dealing with it.

The announcement of the deal is also bound to open a can ofenvironmental worms in Russia, especially following the publication of aletter written by Russia's nuclear regulatory body, Gosatomnadzor (GAN),to the Kremlin, which stated that Russia's nuclear infrastructure wasnot capable of handling reprocessing waste from abroad. It is alsolikely to cause friction for Bulgaria with the EU, where it is generallyheld that Russia's nuclear facilities are not even able to handle thesafe storage of their own waste, to say nothing of imports from abroad.

But in recent weeks - a year after the controversial passage oflegislation allowing the import of radioactive waste to Russia -Russia'snuclear ministry, Minatom, has been mounting a vociferous campaign toattract foreign customers for the SNF storage and reprocessing plansthat it says will net the government $20 billion over the next tenyears.

Among the pitches Nuclear Minister Alexander Rumyantsev has made topotential clients is that Russia's prices for accepting waste are athird to a half lower than those of its competitors, England and France.But the $620 per kilogram of SNF being paid by Bulgaria is a mark-downeven on Rumyantsev's proposed bargains of $1,000 per kilogram.

The governmental agreement on the Kozlodui shipments, signed betweenUkraine, Russia and Bulgaria at the end of last week, gives Russia theright to transport SNF from the Bulgarian plant across the territory ofUkraine for 10 years, a spokesman at the Bulgarian Embassy in Moscowtold Bellona Web Monday. Bulgarian government officials contacted inSofia Monday confirmed the agreement.

According to one government official in Sofia, who asked not to beidentified, the SNF exports from the plant - for which the Bulgariangovernment will be paying Russia $620 per kilogram to take forreprocessing - are, "in part," an effort to clear the Kozlodui plant ofas much SNF as it can before the country becomes an EU member state.According to one EU official, however, it is unclear when thatmembership will be granted to Bulgaria.

The Bulgarian government source said the first shipment, which heestimated to be approximately 40 tonnes with a price tag of $24.8million, is likely to leave Bulgaria for the Mayak Chemical Combinesometime before the end of the year.

"We have always returned fuel to Russia for reprocessing, but when webecome an EU member state, this option may no longer be open to usbecause of EU concerns about the state of Russia's reprocessinginfrastructure," the official said.

"Nonetheless, we now have and have always had confidence in Russia'sability to safely fulfil this undertaking."

The Kozlodui plant has four VVER-440 reactor blocs, whose waste Mayak isequipped to reprocess. It also has two VVER-1000 reactors, whose wasteis slated for reprocessing at Zheleznogorsk - if Zheleznogorsk everfinishes building its reprocessing facility. The SNF would meanwhilehave to be stored for what GAN estimates to be 20 years until thereprocessing facility is completed.

The EU's stance

Just what the EU Commission's position on exports of fissile materialsto Russia is has not been codified.

But Derek Taylor, head of the nuclear unit at the European Commission'sDirectorate-General for Energy and Transport, told Bellona Web in anemail interview that member states of the EU can export their waste toother countries as long as the receiving country has the legal,regulatory and technical capability to manage it safely, and has agreedto the import - a position known as EURATOM Directive 92/3. Under thisdirective, such imports have to be authorized by the EuropeanCommission.

To more carefully enforce these regulations, the European Commission andmembers of Russia's State Duma have established, on Bellona'sinitiative, a watchdog group to monitor contacts between Minatom andEuropean nuclear power plants regarding possible import contracts toRussia.

Although the European Commission has not yet adopted any formal positionon the export of spent nuclear fuel to the Russians, the line that isnow generally followed, according to officials, is that Russia is not ina currently in a position to guarantee the safety and security of anysuch imports as its facilities are thought to be inadequate for the safemanagement of spent fuel generated within the country.

GAN's recent letter to the Kremlin unequivocally endorses this line,suggesting that Bulgaria's efforts to ship its SNF to Russia representan inconsistency in Bulgaria's current policies and the behaviour itintends to exhibit for the EU in the future.

When asked if the import plan represented a hypocritical stance for hisstate, the official said: "We prefer to view it as practical." He addedhowever, that since the waste was slated for reprocessing, it might notconstitute waste under EURATOM Directive 92/3, which regulates storageof SNF. That being the case, the spent fuel would fall under thejurisdiction of a Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent FuelManagement and Radioactive Waste. This Convention has yet to takeeffect, but it will contain similar standards for destination countriesthat apply when SNF is shipped as waste for storage.

According to GAN Deputy Chairman Alexander Dmitriev, who co-authored theletter to the Kremlin criticizing Minatom's import plans, the MayakChemical Combine - which is the apparent destination for at least thefirst shipment of Bulgarian SNF - doesn't meet those standards.

"Forty tonnes [of SNF] to Mayak is theoretically possible because Mayakcan theoretically handle 400 tonnes [of reprocessing] a year," he toldBellona Web.

"But there are unfortunately a number of technical questions about howthey deal with waste at Mayak, and I'll just say that these methods caneasily be criticized."

Past Bulgarian shipments problematic

Despite several calls, responsible officials at Minatom could not bereached to comment on the Bulgarian deal, but it is consistent withrecent pronouncements by Rumyantsev that his ministry would be pursuingcontracts with former Soviet Bloc countries, especially Bulgaria, whereRussia has undisputed consent rights over spent fuel. The United Statescontrol the remaining 70 to 90 percent of the world's SNF.

Indeed, imports from Bulgaria are nothing new and have been coming evenprior to last year's package of legislation that opened the borders forradioactive waste from any country with rights to send it. But ashipment of waste from Kozlodui's two VVER-1000 reactors toZheleznogorsk at the end of 2001- the first Bulgarian shipments since1998 - resulted in scandal when it became known that the contract forthe load was a sham.

In the contract, a company by the name of Energy Invest and TradeCorporation, an offshore company based in Cyprus, was listed as thepayee for the shipment. As was later discovered, however, Energy Investand Trade had ceased to exist as early as the beginning of 2001.According to government and environmental sources, President VladimirPutin was enraged by the scam and called Minatom on the carpet over theapparent dupe. In the resulting fallout, Deputy Minister of AtomicEnergy Valentin Ivanov was fired.

But that was not all. The fuel assemblies in the SNF load, according toGAN's Dmitriev, arrived still packed with so-called absorption rods, instrict violation of GAN policies governing imports. Additionally,according to Vladimir Slivyak of the anti-nuclear group Ecodefence!, thetrain carrying the load only narrowly avoided a disastrous accident thatwould have led to it shedding its load.

The Bulgarian shipments have also been the target of fierceenvironmental protests in Moldova and Romania, both of which have deniedBulgaria more convenient shipping routes across their own territory.

Future of deal unclear

GAN's Dmitriev criticized the new tri-government agreement as "unclear"and "vague," and predicted - despite Bulgaria's assertion that the firstload would come before year's end - that "[SNF import plans] will all bediscussed at higher levels before that happens."

"President [Vladimir] Putin will apparently be returning to this issueand apparently there will be more discussions about it," he said.

Dmitriev asserted that the basic foundations of the import programmehave yet to be clarified and codified as law.

"At present, though [Bulgaria] says this SNF is for reprocessing, wenever know if we are taking a shipment for reprocessing or for storage,"he said, adding that any shipments to Zheleznogorsk, even if they arefor prospective reprocessing, amount to storage because of the 20-yearlag-time before reprocessing of Kozlodui's VVER-1000 fuel can beginthere.

"If they absolutely have to start importing now," said Dmitriev somewhatwryly, "then it should be done gradually, in small quantities, becausethe legislative basis has to be improved and the technical basis has tobe improved - and we need to know, finally, what we are supposed to dowith all this material and waste."
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4.
Russian Atomic Ministry To Launch New Reactor By 2012
Interfax
August 12, 2002
(for personal use only)


The Russian Atomic Ministry hopes to launch a new type of reactor -VVER-1500 - which will be more effective than other Russian reactors, by2012, Deputy Atomic Minister Andrei Malyshev said.

"The most promising location for the first such reactor isLeningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant 2," he said. According to the deputyminister, VVER-1500 reactors may also be built at Smolensk Nuclear PowerPlant-2 and, in the future, at a plant to be built in Bashkortostan.

Malyshev said that a final decision on the construction of the VVER-1500reactor would be reached based on the recommendations from the AtomicMinistry's scientific-technical council. He said that the cost of thenew reactor amounts to about $1.1 billion and that the payback period is20% shorter than for other reactors, for example the VVER-1000.

Malyshev noted that there is already a similar reactor in Europe - theEPR-1800, developed by Siemens and Framatom.
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5.
A Consignment Of Spent Nuclear Fuel Arrives From Ukraine At ChemicalProcessing Works Near Krasnoyarsk
Boris Ivanov
RIA Novosti
August 12, 2002
(for personal use only)


A train of seven armoured wagons-containers with spent nuclear fuel onMonday safely arrived from Ukraine at the chemical processing works nearKrasnoyarsk (Siberia).

As the head of the public relations service of the works, Pavel Morozov,reported, several days later, after appropriate procedures at the localcustoms, another consignment of containers with spent nuclear fuel willbe stored under a ten-metre layer of water.

On Monday the Krasnoyarsk works completed the placing into the storageof the containers which had arrived from the Kalinin nuclear power plant(centre of the European part of Russia). Yury Morozov said that in 2002the works had transferred more than 128 million roubles to the budget ofthe Krasnoyarsk Territory for the storage of spent nuclear fuel.
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6.
Ukraine And Russia Negotiate Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments
Bellona
August 7, 2002
(for personal use only)


New Russian legislation on shipments of foreign spent nuclear fuel (SNF)into the country approved in 2001 requires amendments in the procedureof SNF export from Ukraine to Russia. Negotiations to this extent arecurrently underway between Russia's Miniatry for Nuclear Energy, orMinatom, and Ukraine's nuclear energy utility Energoatom, UNIANreported.

Starting from November 2002, when all regulations required for the newSNF legislation are in place, shipments of Ukrainian SNF should be inconsent with them. One of the problem that should be addressed in thenear future is the shipment to Russia of the control rods (neutronabsorbers) which relate to nuclear waste but are a part of fuelcassettes. Russia's Nuclear Regulatory, GAN, protested against shipmentsof the control rods, but both for Ukraine and Russia the separation ofthe control rods from the fuel will lead to additional expenses.

The Ukrainian side is also concerned with the price increase for SNFshipments to Russia. According to new regulations, approved by theRussian government, all fuel related contracts go now through two statecompanies TVEL and Tekhsnabexport. Earlier practice built on directcontacts between Ukraine and Mayak plant in Chelyabinsk region and RT-2plant in Krasnoyarsk region.

Ukraine is currently seeking cheaper ways to manage SNF than sending itto Russia. At Ukrainian Zaporozhskaya NPP there is a project underway tostore SNF in casks.
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C. Russian Nuclear Power Industry

1.
Russia's Nuclear Energy Utility To Apply For Loan In Commercial Banks
Bellona
August 14, 2002
(for personal use only)


Rosenergoatom, state nuclear energy utility, is to apply for $300m loanin commercial banks, given the state grants guarantee, to complete twonuclear reactors, ABN reported. The documents to this extent have beenfiled by Rosenergoatom to the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry ofEconomical Development. The loan will be spent to complete reactor unitno. 3 at Kalinin NPP and reactor unit no. 5 at Kursk NPP. Those twounits are scheduled to enter operation in 2003 2004. At the same timeRosenergoatom has to pay $30m to a private company ERKO which managed inearlier 1990s to buy nuclear units machinery and rent it out to Kalinin,Balakovo and Smolensk NPPs. The twist with Rosenergoatom/Minatom hasbeen dragging for years and been eventually resolved in favour of ERKOwhen the former director of this company became an executive manager ofRosenergoatom.
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2.
Russia Plans Building Of Floating Nuke Reactor
Associated Press
August 13, 2002
(for personal use only)


Russia has completed development work on creating a floating nuclearpower plant, and is now studying how to construct such a facility, thestate nuclear energy company said Tuesday.

Rosenergoatom said that it has received all necessary permits to moveforward with the unprecedented project.

But a spokesman for the state agency said it was too early to say wherethe small-capacity power plant would be located. The Atomic EnergyMinistry said earlier this year that it was considering the White Sea.

Earlier proposals also called for a floating nuclear power plant in theChukotka region, which faces Alaska across the Bering Strait, and offthe Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia's Far East.

Rosenergoatom said Russian experts were to travel to China on Wednesdayto consult with their Chinese counterparts about construction of theplant. The company said that discussions would focus on cooperation withChinese financial, energy and shipyard companies.

Russia has long been interested in using such plants to supplyelectricity to remote northern and eastern regions where severe weathermakes construction on land difficult and expensive. But despite frequentannouncements that the project had the green light, construction has notyet begun.

Environmentalists have criticized the plans as too risky, and questionedRussia's ability to safeguard such a facility from terrorists. Criticshave also expressed concern about Russia's ability to safely build andmanage a floating nuclear power plant.

Russia's nuclear reactors were designed in the Soviet era and many arein need of repair, prompting frequent minor malfunctions. The SovietUnion was the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, in 1986, atChernobyl, Ukraine.
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D. Russia-Iran
1.
Atomic Energy Ministry Prepares Documents On Returning Spent NuclearFuel To Russia From Iran
Interfax
August 13, 2002
(for personal use only)


The Atomic Energy Ministry is drawing up documents on the return ofspent Russian nuclear fuel from the Bushehr nuclear power plant toRussia, which will be signed with Iran, First Atomic Energy Minister LevRyabev told journalists.

He said Russia attaches importance to the issue and intends to controlthe materials to be returned by Iran.Ryabev believes this control will prevent any possibility "to use spentfuel for any other purposes."

Commenting on Russia-Iran nuclear cooperation in general, he noted thattoday, Russia is building only one reactor in Iran. "We plan to startputting it in operation in 2003 or in 2004," he stressed.

"As for plans for further programs, no concrete agreements have beenachieved. Moreover, no contracts have been signed," he noted.

"I would not like to say that we will build only one reactor. But I alsowould not like to say that we will certainly build six or any othernumber of reactors, since any such statements would be premature,"Ryabev said.

He said "the most realistic follow-up of the cooperation would be tocomplete the second power generating unit of the Bushehr plant. But, sofar, there are no corresponding agreements or documents."

The first deputy minister stressed that Russia and Iran "still have alot to do regarding the first unit."

"This involves a storage facility for fresh fuel, as well as deliveriesof fresh fuel for the first power generating unit of the Bushehr nuclearpower plant. There issues need to be resolved," Ryabev said.

He against confirmed that "there is no military cooperation betweenRussia and Iran in the nuclear area."

Ryabev recalled that at a meeting with top U.S. Energy Departmentofficials in April, he proposed setting up a joint Russia-U.S. expertgroup that would look into issues of Russia-Iran cooperation which theU.S. view as a matter of concern. "Unfortunately, no such steps havebeen taken. There is only criticism, and when you ask for documents toprove this concern, no such documents are made available. Only anemotional call to stop this cooperation follows," he said.
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E. Nuclear Smuggling/Terrorism

1.
Second Stage Of Program To Search For Radiation Sources In GeorgiaBegins
David Imedashvili
RIA Novosti
August 12, 2002
(for personal use only)


The second stage of the program of the search for radiation sources onGeorgian territory begins on Monday. The program is carried out jointlywith the IAEA and the Georgian government, reports Levan Gogua, head ofthe department for control of nuclear sources and radioactive means ofthe nuclear and radiation security service of the Ministry ofEnvironmental Protection and Natural Resources of Georgia.

According to Gogua, during the second stage of the program which willlast two weeks, specialists of the nuclear and radiation securityservice, the emergency situations and civil defence department ofGeorgia's Interior Ministry and IAEA experts, accompanied by guards andrescuers, will inspect districts in southern Georgia.

Levan Gogua said that it was initially envisaged to carry out aerophotosurveillance of the country's territory, but due to a lack of means theexperts will inspect areas in Georgia on cars or on foot.
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F. Announcements

1.
Russian Deputy Minister Of Foreign Affairs Yuri Fedotov Meets WithJayantha Dhanapala, The UN Under-Secretary-General For DisarmamentAffairs
Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
August 14, 2002


Yuri Fedotov, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the RussianFederation, on August 13 received the UN Under-Secretary-General forDisarmament Affairs, Jayantha Dhanapala.

In the course of the consultations held at the Russian MFA, a thoroughexchange on topical international security issues took place - inparticular, on the problems of nuclear disarmament, the nonproliferationof WMDs and missile technologies, the prevention of the placement ofweapons in outer space, and information security. The sides alsodiscussed the problems of regional security, the lowering of militaryspending levels and use of the funds thus released for developmentpurposes, and the reduction of conventional arms.

They noted the key importance for strategic stability of strengtheningthe Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons regime andensuring the early coming into force of the Comprehensive Test BanTreaty. Jayantha Dhanapala highly assessed the Strategic OffensiveReductions Treaty, recently signed by Russia and the USA.
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2.
Under-Secretary-General To Visit Central Asia For Talks OnNuclear-Weapon-Free Zone
United Nations Department for Disarmament Affairs
August 12, 2002


Jayantha Dhanapala, Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs,will visit Central Asia from 14 to 26 August. Mr. Dhanapala will visitTajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan and willmeet with the political leadership of these countries and seniorofficials.

The visit will focus on the draft treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zonein Central Asia (CANWFZ) that is currently being negotiated among thefive countries.

During his visit, Mr. Dhanapala will also address issues of small armsand light weapons, transparency in armaments and the threat ofterrorism.

The idea of a CANWFZ was originally launched at the summit meeting ofthe Presidents of the Five Central Asian states held in Almaty,Kazakhstan, through the Almaty Declaration of 28 February 1997.

In support of this initiative, the United Nations General Assemblyadopted resolutions 52/38 S (9 December 1997), 53/77 A (4 December 1998)and 55/33 W (20 November 2000) which requested the Secretary-General toprovide assistance to the Central Asian States in the elaboration of anagreement on the establishment of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in CentralAsia.

In response to those resolutions, the Department for DisarmamentAffairs, through its Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asiaand the Pacific, has extended its assistance to the five States interalia by creating a United Nations-sponsored expert group and providingsubstantive and technical advice to the Central Asian countries.
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3.
Russian Minister Of Foreign Affairs Igor Ivanov Speaks To US SecretaryOf State Colin Powell By Telephone
Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
August 12, 2002


A telephone conversation took place on August 9 between Igor Ivanov andUS Secretary of State Colin Powell. The Russian Foreign Minister notedthat Moscow had positively responded to the decision of US PresidentGeorge Bush to continue financing for aid programs to Russia inliquidating nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.

In examining issues in Russian-US antiterrorist cooperation, the sidestouched upon the situation evolving on the Chechen section of theRussian-Georgian border. The latest developments in this area, Ivanovsaid, once again demonstrate that the practical actions of theleadership of Georgia are at variance with its statements about thecombating of terrorism.

The ministers agreed to continue their efforts for Palestinian-Israelisettlement, and in this context noted the importance of the meetingsheld in Washington with the representatives of the PNA.

During the conversation, they also touched upon some other questions onthe Russian-US bilateral and international agenda.
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G. Links of Interest

1.
Facts About "Dirty Bombs" For Industrial Hygienists
AIHA
August 2002
http://www.aiha.org/GovernmentAffairs-PR/html/pr-dirtybomb.htm


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2.
No SORT Of Verification
Nikolai Sokov
Trust and Verify
July/August 2002
http://www.vertic.org/tnv/julaug02/july_aug02.pdf


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3.
USEC Reports FY 2002 Financial Results
U.S. Enrichment Corporation
July 31, 2002
http://www.usec.com/v2001_02/Content/News/NewsFiles/FY2002-Earnings.pdf


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