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Nuclear News - 02/08/02
RANSAC Nuclear News, February 8, 2002
Compiled by David Smigielski


A. Cooperative Threat Reduction
    1. War Paths (excerpted), Peter Beinhart, The New Republic (02/07/02)
    2. Kazakhstan, USA Cooperating To Produce Uranium, Beryllium, Interfax (02/06/02)
B. Debt for Nonproliferation
    1. Russia To Pay Czech Debt With Goods, RFE/RL Newsline (02/07/02)
    2. Money In Exchange For Security, Varvara Aglamishyan, The Russian Issues.com (02/06/02)
C. Russia-U.S.
    1. Nunn Warns Of Iran Pitfall To Russia - U.S. Relations, Reuters (02/08/02)
    2. Russia Gets Help On Weapons Control (excerpted), Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press (02/08/01)
    3. U.S. Now Seeking Binding Deal With Russia On Nuclear Arms, Peter Slevin and Walter Pincus, Washington Post (02/06/02)
D. Russia-Iran
    1. Iran: Russian Nuclear Institute Aids Weapon Scientists, Global Security Newswire (02/06/02)
E. Russia-India
    1. Moscow, Delhi Agree To Speed Up Construction Of Indian Nuclear Power Station, ITAR-TASS (02/08/02)
    2. India Contests For Sea Lane Control, Builds Toward Nuclear Triad (Excerpted) Stratfor.com (02/05/02)
F. Russia-Burma
    1. Myanmar Junta Makes Deal For Reactor, Strengthens Military (Excerpted), Anthony C. LoBaido, WorldNetDaily.com (02/08/02)
G. Russian Nuclear Forces
    1. Russia To Give Priority In Nuclear Weapons Building To The Navy - Top Negotiator, Interfax (02/06/02)
H. Russian Nuclear Waste
    1. Georgia Warns Of Other Nuclear Devices In Country, Reuters (02/05/02)
I. Announcements
    1. Press Release In Connection With Statements By US Administration Officials On Russian American Relations, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (02/07/02)
    2. Regarding The Publication In The USA Of A CIA Report On The Issues Of Nonproliferation Of Weapons Of Mass Destruction, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (02/07/02)
J. Links Of Interest
    1. Statement By Ambassador Eric M. Javits, United States Representative To The Conference On Disarmament (02/07/02)
    2. Testimony Of Director Of Central Intelligence George J. Tenet Before The Senate Select Committee On Intelligence (02/06/02)
    3. A Positive Agenda For U.S.-Russian Strategic Relations, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (02/06/01)
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A. Cooperative Threat Reduction

1.
War Paths (excerpted)
Peter Beinhart
The New Republic
February 7, 2001
(for personal use only)


[.]

If the Bush administration is serious, it needs to go after supply.Since the cold war's end, the Russian defense ministry has reported 175attempts to steal nuclear materials from its poorly guarded storehouses.In 1998 an employee at a Russian nuclear lab in Arzamas was arrested fortrying to sell nuclear weapons designs to representatives of thegovernments of Afghanistan and Iraq. And yet last year the Bushadministration tried to cut the Department of Energy's budget fornuclear security in the former ussr (DOE handles the bulk of suchefforts) by 32 percent. Congress restored the funding, but when it gavethe administration $20 billion in discretionary spending forantiterrorism efforts after September 11, the Bushies didn't spend adime on Russian nuclear safety. The administration's just-releasedbudget is better, but it still leaves funding for the highly respectedNunn-Lugar program--which secures Russian uranium and bomb-gradeplutonium against theft--essentially flat.

Installing security cameras in Russian warehouses and paying thesalaries of Russian scientists sounds a lot like foreign aid, which isprobably why the Bush administration hasn't made it a priority. But it'sthe vital corollary to the president's bellicose rhetoric. In fact, ifthe Bushies really want to keep uranium, long-range missiles, and poisongas from Saddam Hussein and Ayatollah Khamenei, they need todramatically expand America's nuclear safeguard efforts to includePakistan, whose nuclear materials and know-how are, if anything, evenmore vulnerable than Russia's. Unless the Bush administration beginstaking this unglamorous preventative work seriously, all itshigh-pitched rhetoric won't impress anyone; in fact, it will start tograte.

[.]
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2.
Kazakhstan, USA Cooperating To Produce Uranium, Beryllium
Interfax
February 6, 2002
(for personal use only)


The United States will allocate funds to Kazatomprom, Kazakhstan'snational nuclear corporation, to improve the technology for recoveringuranium powder at the Ulba Metals Plant in East Kazakhstan, as perunderstandings reached three years ago, Kazatomprom told Interfax.

As reported, the US National Nuclear Security Administration has issueda grant of 1.2m dollars over three years as part of the nuclearnonproliferation effort to help the Ulba plant to improve the extractionof uranium dioxide from scrap. Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF) and RWE NukemCorp. are also making financial contributions.

Last year, the Ulba works started to reduce materials containing uraniumto a ceramic dioxide powder form for GNF. This was the first steptowards the provision of services to western companies that involveprocessing scrap and other uranium-containing materials in an effort tostreamline the production of nuclear fuel, making fuel safer andreducing waste.

Kazatomprom says it has already signed contracts to process scrap withGeneral Electric of the United States and BNFL of Britain.

The powders to produce nuclear fuel pellets are being certified for thewestern market. They have already been certified by GE and ought to becertified for Western Europe and Southeast Asia within a year or two.

The Ulba works already has a contract with Brush Wellman, the USA'sbiggest beryllium marketing company, to sell beryllium on the worldmarket. The ten-year deal to 2009 states that Ulba will also supplyproducts containing beryllium to Brush Wellman for sale in the UnitedStates.

The Ulba works is the largest producer of nuclear fuel in the CIS and isthe only company in Eurasia to produce the full range of berylliumproducts - from rough ingots to finished goods. Raw materials aresupplied from Kazatomprom uranium deposits - the Stepnoy and Centralmines and Mine No 6.

Kazatomprom has, in line with targets, increased uranium mine outputfrom 794 tonnes in 1998 to more than 2,000 tonnes in 2001.
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B. Debt for Nonproliferation

1.
Russia To Pay Czech Debt With Goods
RFE/RL Newsline
February 7, 2002
(for personal use only)


Russia will pay part of its debt to the Czech Republic by supplyingproducts worth $210 million, ITAR-TASS reported on 6 February. Anagreement on the partial debt settlement was signed in Prague by RussianDeputy Finance Minister Sergei Kolotukhin and his Czech counterpartLadislav Zelinka. Under the agreement, Russia will supply fuel for Czechnuclear power stations, equipment for nuclear power engineering researchand for energy carriers.
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2.
Money In Exchange For Security
Varvara Aglamishyan
The Russian Issues.com
February 6, 2002
(for personal use only)


It looks like the U.S. authorities are beginning to think about whatmakes people associate Russia with world terrorism. "There are manysources for weapons and it takes years to get or build them. But there'sa shortcut, a place that has it all. It's "the candy store.' Otherpeople call it "Russia,'" said Joseph R. Biden, Chairman of the U.S.Senate Foreign Relations Committee. To distract us from this kind ofbusiness, the U.S. is likely to help us by providing funds.

The senator called for reducing "Russia's Soviet-era debt" andincreasing the spending on securing Russian nuclear and chemicalweapons. In his view, increased spending for these purposes wouldprevent these weapons from appearing in Iran, Iraq or other countries.Biden believes that poor security in keeping weapons of mass destructionin Russia makes them easy prey for Iran or Iraq.

Last year the Bush administration ignored similar recommendations givenby the Foreign Relations Committee, although Russian nuclear andchemical arsenals presented a direct threat to U.S. national security atthat time. Now it looks like the U.S. is inclined to approach the matterin a different way.

Incidentally, the view that Russia, which in recent years has hadinsufficient funds for maintaining its military bases and arsenals, maybecome a supermarket for terrorists is shared also in the Middle East.Israeli Vice Prime Minister Natan Shcharansky said the other day thatRussia should revise its policy with regard to Iran. There is a closelink, he said, between the war against terrorism and the policy ofcountries like Iran and Iraq, which are trying to obtain weapons of massdestruction. "Iraq even is prepared to risk its own existence, but itwill not give up the idea of having these kind of weapons," the IsraeliVice Prime Minister said. According to Shcharansky, "there is anunderstanding [in Israel and Russia] of this danger and of the need totake actions against technology leaks," but Russia can do much more tothat end.

Expressed in figures, "much more" looks frightening. It has beenestimated by Senator Biden that $45 billion will have to be spent in thecoming decade on reducing Russia's nuclear arsenal, destroying itschemical weapons, creating a system of tracking down and securing itsmissing radioactive materials, and taking other actions to that end.However, Russia's debt to the U.S. exceeds $3 billion and other creditorcountries hold several times that much. Biden believes that debtreduction will help Russia secure its strategic materials andtechnologies and avoid the expected debt repayment crunch in 2003.

It turns out that Russia still benefits from what was produced in theSoviet era. Some time ago, Russia was granted loans for restructuringits economy and now its debts may be written off so that it could secureits arms. Unfortunately, Russia's political dividends come in only toprevent a disaster
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C. Russia-U.S.

1.
Nunn Warns Of Iran Pitfall To Russia - U.S. Relations
Reuters
February 8, 2002
(for personal use only)


Influential former U.S. senator Sam Nunn urged Moscow and Washington onFriday to quickly flesh out their new relationship or see better tiesstymied by disputes over Iran and Iraq.

After a four-month honeymoon born of Moscow's stalwart support for theU.S. war on terrorism, underlying strains are re-emerging - witnessRussian outrage at a new CIA report accusing Moscow of helping spreadweapons of mass destruction.

Late on Thursday, Russia's Foreign Ministry branded as "categoricallyunacceptable" a declassified agency report which said Russia was stillselling sensitive missile and nuclear know how that helped Tehran'snuclear weapons programme.

"If we do not have some meat on the bones in the next six months, nomatter what the personal relationship between our two leaders may be, Ithink these problems...as well as others, will start gnawing away at therelationship," Nunn told reporters.

Nunn was in Moscow to mark the office opening of the Nuclear ThreatInitiative, a private foundation funded by U.S. media magnate andCNN-founder Ted Turner. It aims to reduce the risk of weapons of massdestruction spreading.

He said tensions had been fuelled by last December's decision by U.S.President George W. Bush to withdraw from the 1972 ABM arms controltreaty, and the Pentagon's reluctance to destroy warheads to be removedunder a new nuclear arms deal.

"Those two features are not assets in forming a partnership. But thosetwo points (and) arms sales to the Iranians, disagreements overIraq...loom much larger if we don't have the strategic framework."

Despite all the bonhomie at last November's summit between Bush andRussian President Vladimir Putin, senior staffers were way behind theirleaders with concrete programmes that could "institutionalise therelationship," he said.

The CIA report laid bare latent Russia-U.S. strains. The CIA said givenMoscow's record, "monitoring Russian proliferation behaviour...willremain a very high priority."

Moscow continued to supply Iran, India, China and Libya with ballisticmissile goods and know-how, said the CIA, which said it would monitorRussian nuclear cooperation with Iran for evidence of it boostingTehran's nuclear weapons programme.

"The Russian government's commitment, willingness and ability to curbproliferation-related transfers remain uncertain," said the CIA report.

The report caused "not just extreme bewilderment but serious concern" inMoscow, the Foreign Ministry said.

The CIA report was doubly galling for Russia, which passed a law in 1999tightening export controls on dual-use and other sensitive technology.The Foreign Ministry said it would demand an explanation from U.S.officials at ongoing security talks.

Nunn said the Bush administration needed to confront Moscow - withhigh-level intelligence reports if necessary - about Russianproliferation. But Washington also had to take into account Russia'sreal financial difficulties - not just preach.

"With the Russians we have to have a little more understanding (of)their economic interests...(which) come first now, even in front ofsecurity.

"We have to...help the Russians to understand that it's in theireconomic best interests to restrict what they are doing with certaincountries in the interests of promoting economic activity with theWest."
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2.
Russia Gets Help On Weapons Control (excerpted)
Vladimir Isachenkov
Associated Press
February 8, 2002
(for personal use only)


A foundation led by Ted Turner and former Sen. Sam Nunn will spend $6million helping Russia reduce threats from nuclear, biological andchemical weapons.

The Nuclear Threat Initiative project should help secure and dismantleweapons of mass destruction, prevent their spread and bolstercooperation between scientists on anti-terrorism issues, Nunn saidFriday.

[.]

Nunn and Sen. Dick Lugar, R-Ind., wrote a 1991 law making $4.7 billionavailable to Russia to help destroy some of its weapons of massdestruction weapons while safeguarding the rest.

Friday's initiative takes further steps to prevent the spread of nuclearand biological weapons technology to terrorists or other countries.

For example, NTI will contribute $1 million to a Russian loan fundestablished to create permanent civilian jobs for workers of Sarov, atop Russian nuclear weapons design and production center that has beenreducing staff.

Another $1.3 million is earmarked for former biological weaponsscientists working on a brucellosis vaccine, while $250,000 will fund afeasibility study for a new hepatitis vaccine.
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3.
U.S. Now Seeking Binding Deal With Russia On Nuclear Arms
Peter Slevin and Walter Pincus
Washington Post
February 6, 2002
(for personal use only)


Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday that the United Statesis seeking a legally binding agreement with Russia to reduce nucleararsenals, a change from the Bush administration's earlier desire for aninformal understanding between the presidents of the two nations.

The administration has not resolved an internal debate about the form apact would take, but Powell, in testimony before the Senate ForeignRelations Committee, mentioned the possibility of a treaty or an"executive agreement" that Congress could debate and approve as a jointresolution. Such an arrangement would state the nations' intentions andverification procedures without being specific.

The drive to establish formal terms is a product of Russian PresidentVladimir Putin's insistence on a binding agreement and theadministration's desire to build what Powell yesterday termed a "newstrategic framework" with Moscow. Powell noted the personal chemistrybetween President Bush and Putin and said there had been a "mostdramatic change" in relations between the nations.

U.S. and Russian officials are working on a document for the presidentsto sign in May, when Bush visits Russia. At their summit in the UnitedStates last November, Bush pledged to reduce the number of deployed U.S.warheads from today's 6,000 to between 1,700 and 2,200 by 2012. Putinresponded with a vow to cut two-thirds of the Russian arsenal, to about1,500 warheads.

But Putin has said the reductions must be verifiable, irreversible andlegally binding, despite the opposition of some senior administrationofficials to strict, detailed international agreements. The Russianleader also wants a pledge that warheads taken from service will bedestroyed and not stored for future use, as the Bush administration hasproposed.

Powell presented a review of U.S. foreign policy to the Senate panel oneday after the White House submitted a $25.4 billion internationalaffairs budget to Congress. He sought money for 399 more diplomats,better embassy security, more sophisticated computers, increased U.S.broadcasts abroad and peacekeeping sponsored by the United Nations.

"As we have seen in Afghanistan, it is often best to use American GIsfor the heavy lifting of combat and leave the peacekeeping to others,"Powell said, reflecting the administration's decision to help train anAfghan army but commit no soldiers to peacekeeping duties.

Powell spoke positively about relations with Russia and China whilesaying that the administration repeatedly conveys its frustration abouthuman rights and weapons proliferation to the leaders of both countries.He also noted that a number of "new friends" in the fight against the alQaeda terrorist organization have poor human rights records. He namedUzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan.

The United States has based forces in Uzbekistan, as well as Kyrgyzstan,for the war in Afghanistan as part of an expanded presence in CentralAsia. Yesterday, the foreign minister of Kazakhstan, KassymzhomartTokaev, told Washington Post reporters and editors that talks areunderway about stationing U.S. forces at an air base in his country. Hesaid the troops would be available for humanitarian and militaryoperations.

Administration officials said last night that the United States andRussia have not resolved the terms of a nuclear weapons agreement, withthe Russians intent on a signed document containing detailedverification procedures. One reason for Russia's sensitivity is Bush'srecent decision to withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treatydespite Russian objections.

Powell testified that the United States understands the importance ofcodifying the missile agreement and has been examining "different waysin which this can happen." He explained "it can be an executiveagreement that both houses of Congress might wish to speak on, or itmight be a treaty."

The internal discussion has focused on three different levels ofagreements, according to arms control experts from previousadministrations who have been informed of the debate.

One approach would be an executive agreement, signed by Bush and Putin,in which both countries would separately state their targets to cuttheir offensive strategic forces.

A second possibility is a treaty that would formalize verification ofthe reductions both sides intend to undertake, the sources said.

A third option would be a presidential proclamation designed to reassureMoscow about U.S. intentions in the area of missile defense, accordingto the sources.
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D. Russia-Iran

1.
Iran: Russian Nuclear Institute Aids Weapon Scientists
Global Security Newswire
February 6, 2002
(for personal use only)


Russian sources have said Iranian scientists are acquiring nuclearweapons expertise in Russia to help accelerate Iran's nuclear weaponsprogram, the Australian reported today (see GSN, Jan. 31).

A handful of Iranian nuclear scientists were working last week at theNikiet nuclear research institute outside of Moscow, according to theAustralian (see GSN, Jan. 15). The institute focuses on the developmentof Chernobyl-type nuclear reactors (see GSN, Dec. 20, 2001).

"They are here unofficially and have been told to keep as low a profileas possible," a Russian intelligence source was quoted as saying. "Theyare being taught and are gaining experience they cannot get at home. Itis hardly a secret that the Iranians are in a race to develop nuclearweapons"
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E. Russia-India

1.
Moscow, Delhi Agree To Speed Up Construction Of Indian Nuclear PowerStation
ITAR-TASS
February 8, 2002
(for personal use only)


Russia and India have agreed to speed up preparations for theconstruction of the nuclear power station at Kudankulam in Tamil Nadustate and to move on to actual construction. Agreement on this wasreached during the plenary session of the Russian-Indianintergovernmental commission on trade, economic, scientific, technicaland cultural cooperation which ended on Thursday [8 February]. AnITAR-TASS correspondent learnt today from circles close to the jointworking party on energy matters, which forms part of the commission,that the co-chairmen of the commission, Russian Deputy Prime MinisterIlya Klebanov and Indian Finance Minister Yashwant Sinha, "have agreedto the working party's recommendation that construction be completed assoon as possible".

It is already about 13 years since the 2.6bn-dollar project wasinitiated. In 1998, after a lengthy interruption, it was decided toresume work on its implementation. In July 2001 the two sides drew uppricing parameters for the contract under which Russia would supply twolight-water reactors of 1,000 MW each and 90 per cent of the otherequipment. Drafting of the technical side of the project has beencompleted. Preparatory earthwork has already started at the site inKudankulam.

The original target date for commissioning of the station was 2007. TheIndians are also examining the possibility of enlarging the station infuture by installing additional reactors of the same type. Their targetis to increase the station's capacity to 40,000 MW by 2020.

The agreement on the Kudankulam station envisages that it will operateunder IAEA control.
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2.
India Contests For Sea Lane Control, Builds Toward Nuclear Triad(Excerpted)
Stratfor.com
February 5, 2002
(for personal use only)


Summary

India is working on a defense protocol with Russia, its traditionalweapons supplier, and eyeing arms deals with the United States. Theitems on New Delhi's shopping list show that India is focusing on itsnaval capabilities and is serious about becoming a nuclear power.Ultimately, it will be China -- not Pakistan -- that must confront newnaval challenges from India.

Analysis

India is capitalizing on growing U.S. interest in South Asia's securityenvironment to push for rapid expansion of its military capabilities.Reports from India suggest New Delhi is on the verge of signing majordefense contracts with its traditional supplier, Russia, as well as withthe United States.

However, India's acquisitions are not directed primarily at rivalPakistan, but rather at gaining control of sea lanes in the Indian Oceanand through the seas and straits of Southeast Asia. India's militarybuildup will threaten China, its main competitor for power in thisregion, especially as the purchases lay the groundwork for a strategicnuclear triad.

As always, New Delhi is looking first to Moscow to meet its armamentsneeds. Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov arrived in New Delhi on Feb.3 for talks with Indian Defense Minister George Fernandes. India andRussia are expected to sign a defense protocol next week that will pavethe way for a series of new weapons purchases and leases.

These deals reportedly include the long-sought lease of two Viktor IIIclass submarines. The nuclear-powered Viktor III is capable of extendedpatrols, and it can be armed with SS-N-15 anti-submarine missiles andSS-N-21 intermediate-range cruise missiles, both capable of mounting 200kT nuclear warheads. The leases would supposedly start in 2004 and lastfor five years while India continued to develop its own indigenousnuclear submarine program. Additionally, India would lease two RussianTu-22 Backfire bombers. These nuclear-capable intermediate-range bombersare also used for maritime reconnaissance. India reportedly may alsofinalize the deal for the purchase of the Russian Kiev class aircraftcarrier, the Admiral Gorshkov.

[.]

Though none of these sales have been finalized, India's shopping listmakes three things clear. First, India is focused on its maritimecapabilities. Second, by extension, its strategic planning is notconcentrated on the Pakistani threat. And third, India is serious aboutbecoming a nuclear power.

[.]

But India's military acquisitions, combined with its continued work onland-based ballistic missiles, emphasize New Delhi's commitment todeveloping a strategic nuclear triad capable of deterring any challengein South Asia and securing India's position as regional hegemon. This isa major goal of Indian defense planners. As recently as January, thecommander of the Indian navy, Madhvendra Singh, said, "Any country thatespouses a no-first-use policy must have. a triad of nuclear weapons,one of them at sea. The most powerful leg of the triad is the navalone."

A comprehensive nuclear strategy is ideally based on a triad of weaponssystems: land-based missiles, submarine-based missiles andnuclear-capable bombers. India has moved aggressively to developmissile-based nuclear systems. With the acquisition of nuclear-capablebombers and submarines, India is taking the first steps to completingthe triad.

[.]
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F. Russia-Burma

1.
Myanmar Junta Makes Deal For Reactor, Strengthens Military (Excerpted)
Anthony C. LoBaido
WorldNetDaily.com
February 8, 2002
(for personal use only)


Myanmar is hoping to buy a nuclear reactor from Russia, and Moscowappears more than ready to supply it to the junta. The InternationalAtomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, based in Vienna, Austria, is already busypumping Russia for details on the specifications of said reactor andinformation on the 200 technicians that Myanmar recently sent to Russiafor high-tech nuclear training.

[.]

Myanmar government officials have admitted openly that these techniciansare currently in Russia getting nuclear training.

Foreign Minister Aung Win told the international media that Burma is"committed to developing a nuclear research facility for medicalpurposes and possibly to generate nuclear power." He also said thatBurma was interested in studying the different uses of nuclear energy.

"After all, many other countries in the world are using nuclear power,"Aung Win told the international media last week. He also indicated thatthe junta has asked the IAEA for financial assistance in constructingthe reactor.

According to statements released by the junta, Myanmar fully expects thenuclear reactor to be online "within a few years." The junta has beenunwilling to say what it will do with the nuclearwaste generated by the proposed project. In the past, industrializednations like Taiwan have sought to "sell" their nuclear and other toxicwaste for dumping rights in nations like Cambodia and North Korea.Lawmakers in the U.S. have objected to such dumping agreements.

Myanmar's quest for a nuclear reactor, and the swift American responseto it, was virtually unreported in the U.S. media. Even so, the UnitedStates last week warned the junta that it must honor its obligationsunder the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

A spokesman for the U.S. State Department told Agence France-Presse, "Weexpect the government of Burma to live up to its obligations and to notpursue production of weapons-grade fissile material."

There are many questions being asked in the West about Burma's nuclearambitions and intentions. Are they peaceful? What will be done with thewaste from the reactor, which can be turned into a "dirty" orradioactive bomb? Who will safeguard the project from terrorists?

Ivan Putkin is a Russian military intelligence officer stationed inSoutheast Asia who agreed to an interview with WorldNetDaily.

"Burma has not graduated doctors and scientists from its universitiesfor almost 15 years. But let's be honest, once the Burmese junta hasnuclear power, building a bomb is possible, and then the West, the EU oreven ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations) will be unableto take away Burma's multi-billion dollar drug crops, routes andmercenary armies," Putkin said.

The foreign assistance the junta requires to go nuclear is coming fromRussia, which is also supplying the aforementioned MiGs.

Putkin told WND that Russia's involvement does not suprise him.

"It is well-known that Russia has given training to the Aum Shin Rikyocult in Japan and sold satellite photos of South Korea to North Korea.There is a fire sale going on in Russia these days - even nuclearreactors and technological assistance can be had," he said.
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G. Russian Nuclear Forces

1.
Russia To Give Priority In Nuclear Weapons Building To The Navy - TopNegotiator
Interfax
February 6, 2002
(for personal use only)


The first deputy chief of the General Staff [and Russia's chief armsnegotiator], Col-Gen Yuriy Baluyevskiy, has said that Russia will givepriority in the development of strategic nuclear forces to the nuclearfleet.

In an interview with Interfax-AVN [Military News Agency], Baluyevskiyannounced: "All our military construction plans give priority to thesecond, that is, the sea-based arm of our strategic nuclear forces."

The general added that "the state of our ground-based strategic nuclearforces will be entirely satisfactory for the next five to seven, ormaybe 10 years".

Baluyevskiy stressed that Russia will retain its nuclear triad ofground, sea and air forces, notwithstanding the plans for a radicalreduction in strategic offensive weapons to 1,500 nuclear warheads.

"The triad is the optimum structure for strategic nuclear forces, and wehave no intention of abandoning it," the deputy chief of the GeneralStaff said.

He considers that the US decision to create a missile defence system"will not pose any military threat to us in the next decade". He notedthat Russia will not go down the road of "asymmetrical action" inresponse to the USA withdrawing from the ABM Treaty.

"We could have taken a decision to increase the number of our deployedmissiles and the weapons they carry, but this would have taken usnowhere, to a new stage in the arms race. Russia does not need this atthe moment, and we will not be taking this path," the general stressed.
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H. Russian Nuclear Waste

1.
Georgia Warns Of Other Nuclear Devices In Country
Reuters
February 5, 2002
(for personal use only)


A Georgian minister, speaking after the recovery of two containersfilled with radioactive material, said on Tuesday that other radioactiveobjects existed in Georgia but they still had to be traced.

Environment Minister Nino Chkhobadze was speaking after an InternationalAtomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team recovered two titanium-based ceramiccontainers that had been found in western Georgia and moved them to safestorage.

The discovery in December of the containers near the border of Georgia'sbreakaway Abkhazia region renewed fears, following the September 11attacks on America, that nuclear material could fall into the hands ofpeople who would use it to make crude bombs.

"We have information that on the territory of Georgia there are sourcesof radiation, two of which have the same power as those which were takeout of western Georgia," Chkhobadze told a news conference.

"However, the exact whereabouts of these sources (of radiation) are notyet known," she added. She did not say what the basis of her informationwas.

Chkhobadze said, however, that efforts to trace them would initiallyfocus on former Soviet military sites -- and she left open thepossibility that they might even be stored on the two Russian bases inthe former Soviet state.

The Soviet Union, one of the world's five recognized nuclear powers,broke up in 1991 and nuclear materials once under its control haveturned up in many of its former republics.

The three Georgians who discovered the containers of radioactivestrontium-90 material in western Georgia suffered severe radiationsickness and one of them was still critically ill.
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I. Announcements

1.
Press Release In Connection With Statements By US AdministrationOfficials On Russian American Relations
Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
February 7, 2002
(for personal use only)


A number of public statements have been issued in the last few days byofficials of the US administration, in particular, Secretary of StateColin Powell and US Trade Representative Robert Zoellick, giving apositive assessment of the state of and prospects for Russian-Americanrelations, and stressing the intention of Washington to build further onits close coordination and cooperation with Russia in all fields so asto come with weighty results to the upcoming May summit in Moscow.

Significantly, constructive elements were contained even in thetestimony on February 6 by CIA Director George Tenet before the USSenate Committee on Intelligence. In particular, Tenet singled out theintensification of cooperation between our two countries as the "mostimpressive event of the year," and emphasized the great importance ofRussian-American coordination in the struggle against internationalterrorism and other global threats.

This mood of the US administration is fully consistent with ourapproaches to the development of relations with the USA. We believe thatthe next meeting between the Presidents of the two countries in Russiawill help to consolidate their mutual striving for reciprocallyadvantageous cooperation and to reach major joint accords, including alegally binding agreement on radical strategic offensive armsreductions.
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2.
Regarding The Publication In The USA Of A CIA Report On The Issues OfNonproliferation Of Weapons Of Mass Destruction
Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
February 7, 2002
(for personal use only)


A non-classified version of the CIA's report to Congress on the issuesof the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) waspublished in the United States a few days ago.

It is not for the first time that the US intelligence agency addressesthis theme, but the "revelations" about Russia contained in this reportcause not only extreme bewilderment but also serious concern.

Perhaps for the first time in the recent period, an official Americandocument makes an attempt to cast doubt on the "commitment, desire andability" of Russia's Government to prevent a "leak" of sensitive goodsand technologies abroad. Such a formulation of the question iscategorically unacceptable. It is absolutely contrary to the principledline and practical steps of Russia with regard to the nonproliferationof WMD and their delivery means.

Russia strictly abides by its international obligations in carrying outexport supplies of sensitive goods and technologies. Well known are theconsistent efforts being taken in our country to implement the 1999Federal Export Control Law. A major step in further strengthening thenational export control system was the Russian Federation SecurityCouncil meeting held in February 2001, of which the CIA report says nota single word. Yet the American side had been informed about all this inthe course of the continuing Russian-American expert dialogue onnonproliferation problems.

In view of the foregoing, the Russian side will insist on officialexplanations from the United States, including in the course of currentconsultations on international security issues.
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J. Links of Interest

1.
Statement By Ambassador Eric M. Javits, United States Representative ToThe Conference On Disarmament
February 7, 2002
http://lists.state.gov/SCRIPTS/WA-USIAINFO.EXE?A2=ind0202a&L=WF-EUROPE&P=R15441


2.
Testimony Of Director Of Central Intelligence George J. Tenet Before The
Senate Select Committee On Intelligence
February 6, 2002
http://lists.state.gov/SCRIPTS/WA-USIAINFO.EXE?A2=ind0202a&L=WFEUROPE&P=R4940


3.
A Positive Agenda For U.S.-Russian Strategic Relations
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
February 06, 2002
http://www.ceip.org/files/nonprolif/templates/events.asp?p=8&EventID=448


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